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September 2012
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

New Twitter Profile Tips for Writers - GalleyCat

Twitter's getting a facelift. Are you ready to fully utilize the new features?     

                                                  

31 Book Marketing Ideas You Can Use - Today! -Duolit

These are 31 tips and tricks that are simple, yet could prove to be invaluable.             

 

Film

 

6 Filmmaking Tips from Monty Python - Film School Rejects

And now for something completely different: the kings of oddball sketch comedy have a lot to teach young filmmakers.

 

Innovative Cloud Filmmaking with Tiffany Shlain - Innovation Excellence

Are you prepared for access to even greater resources via a filmmaking cloud? 

 

Music

 

How to Get Comfortable with Music Marketing - Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotions Blog

If sales isn't you're thing, Bob has a few words of wisdom for you.

 

How to Use Rhyme to Enhance Your Lyrics - Blogging Muses

You should make the time to read this article about finding your rhyme.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 21, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - September 14, 2012

947 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: author, author, self-publishing, self-publishing, blogging, blogging, promotions, promotions, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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I received an interesting email in response to one of my recent newsletters, in which I share news about my books and appearances, as well as writing and marketing tips for authors. A subscriber named Sara asked if I could address what she called "the fear of completing the project."


Talk about hitting the nail on the head, as I suffer from this condition myself. I recently finished the first draft of my fourth novel, and while many of my fans would be surprised to learn this, I experienced low-grade yet near constant anxiety throughout the entire writing process. Why? Because I was afraid of what the reaction to the finished work would be. What if people hated it? What would I do then?


Many authors share their work with trusted readers as they go, then tweak and adjust according to the feedback they get. I don't use this approach. I write in a vacuum for months, not sharing a page with anyone. When I'm done I turn the final product over to my mom - then hold my breath for her reaction. Yes, it's a bit terrifying, but it's the way I write best, so I force myself to trust my ability and power through the fear each day. And if I do that for enough days in a row, eventually I have a book. And then I can relax and let the fun begin, because it's much easier to revise a manuscript than to create one from scratch.


So Sara, if you're reading this, I guess that's my answer. While I recognize that it's easy to procrastinate out of fear, do your best not to. Just power through it, one day at a time. Believe me, you'll be happy you did. Eventually you'll have written an entire book, and that's a pretty amazing feeling, no matter what happens next.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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A Synopsis Can Be Quite Helpful

Save the Wordsmithing for Later

2,525 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, editing, writers, writing, story
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The Three Endings

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 26, 2012

In a lot of ways, I think ending a book is the hardest element of storytelling. A story begins at a very fine point and immediately sprouts countless tentacles that spread out and take the readers through a series of character arcs, plots, and sub-plots. The writer's job is to bring those tentacles back together and return them to a single fine point by the end. I probably spend more time thinking about the end of my novel over the course of writing than I do any other component of the story. If the ending is predetermined, I'm always checking myself to see if I've gone so far off track that I'll never reach that ending. If I don't know the ending, I'm always backtracking through what I've written to find a hidden drawstring to tie everything together after the story's major conflict is concluded.


There are three types of book endings at the storyteller's disposal:


  • Nice & Neat - Everything is concluded. You've either tied everything up with a nice little "happily ever after" bow or you've left things on a decidedly down note. The tone and message aren't the point. The point is that no reader is left wondering how things really ended.
  • Open Ending - You've come through your final conflict. The dust has settled. Those who you meant to be left standing are, and those who met defeat are appropriately defeated. But as the lights dim and you reach that final paragraph, you leave an unanswered question or two about what happens next.
  • The Bridge - You've come to the end of your story, but you realize there's so much more to say. So much so that you see room for a second book, or a third, or a fourth, etc. Your strategy here is to perhaps use a nice and neat ending with a twist. You resolve the conflict but leave a little hint about what's to come.


So, as you reach the end of your book, ask yourself which of the three appeals to you the most. As always, don't necessarily pick the one that you think will please the reader. Pick the one that you believe fits the story.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Importance of Endings

Supplementing Your Novel

1,495 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, book, author, writers, publishing, craft
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Today I have a big, bold, unconventional marketing idea for you. It's so outrageous you may think me mad. However, I got the idea from a recent news story about Star Trek fans reenacting episodes of the original series in a park. They started off as no-budget productions played for scant friends and family, but it has since grown into a low-budget affair sometimes performed in front of hundreds of people.

 

This same idea could be applied to your book. You could create a play based on your novel. Yes, this would take time, organization, and creativity, but going for bold pays off because bold gets noticed. The aim would be to get not just the people in attendance talking about a play based on your book, but the local media. This local media coverage can turn into simultaneous online coverage that can be shared far and wide.

 

Make no mistake about it: this would require lots of effort with no guarantee of payoff, but it has a multitude of marketing possibilities. First, you can document your efforts to put the production together on your blog and your social media networks. From the writing to the auditioning to the rehearsals to opening night, every stage of your triumphs and struggles could make this not just a marketing endeavor, but a compelling journey by independent artists to showcase their art.

 

Why not just do a video, you ask? Because videos have been done before. This idea is unique, and it takes your brand to a highly interactive level. But it is not for everybody; not every author would consider producing a play based on a novel. However, if you're looking for a bold idea, this is one to think about.

 

Now, over to you: what's your boldest marketing strategy?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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More Easy Book Marketing Tips

Build a Plus & Minus Brand Map

1,187 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, promotion, play
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Diary of a Literary Debutante - Salon

Yuko Mishima just signed a publishing deal and she's sharing her journey to publication with the readers of Salon.


Can Your Day Job Lead to Better Writing? -Writer's Digest

Like it or not, that job you hate may be just the thing you need to become a better writer.

 

Film

 

How to Light Your Video on a Budget: Weapons of Mass Production - Filmmaker IQ

Sometimes all it takes is incandescent and fluorescent bulbs to get the right lighting effect.

 

Twelve Ways to Make Your Characters Likeable - Hollywood Oracle

Why do we like some characters even when they're so very bad?

 

Music

 

How to Write A Song, Part 1 - Getting There

What comes first: the words or the melody?

 

Stance Secrets to Singing with Guitar - Judy Rodman

How you hold a guitar can affect your performance as a singer.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 14, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - September 7, 2012

 

904 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: book, book, film, film, author, author, writers, writers, promotions, promotions, craft, craft, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Hook vs. Gimmick

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 19, 2012

Does your book need a better hook or gimmick? Which one will engage your readers and keep them reading? Before you can decide which you should pursue, you should know the difference between the two. And, yes, in the world of books and publishing, there is a difference between a hook and a gimmick.

 

A hook is an element that draws the reader in. It does the seemingly impossible by conveying a simultaneous feeling of familiarity and uniqueness. It is a clever turn of a phrase or a simple yet intense sentence that practically slaps you in the face. It is bending language in such a way that sets the tone and tempo of your story in a single sentence. One of the best examples of a hook comes from Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind:

 

Scarlett O'Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm as the Tarleton twins were.

 

That is a sentence that is compelling enough to read on. That is a hook.

 

A gimmick isn't so much a writing tool as it is a marketing tool. It is an element that uses something other than your writing abilities to sell a book. One example of this is to coordinate online material to reinforce your book's story. A thriller about a serial killer may insert web addresses throughout the book that will allow readers to see crime scene photos, videos of key eye-witness testimony, mug shots of suspects, etc. These are devices that set your book apart from the traditional thriller. This is a gimmick.

 

So, ask yourself again: Do you need to spend more time perfecting your book's hook or creating a gimmick? Which one will help you sell more books?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Don't Insult Your Readers

What Is the Tone of Your Novel?

1,446 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, author, writing, craft, hook
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I was recently at a Manhattan bar with my lovely friend Amanda, and I noticed something comical happening across the room. I pointed it out to her and said something along the lines of "I could totally write a scene about that for my new book." Then I whipped out my phone and sent myself a text message so I wouldn't forget.


Amanda saw me do this and asked an interesting question: "You writers really do find inspiration everywhere. How do you do it?"


I explained that the trick is to pay attention. She'd witnessed the same humorous scene that I had, but it hadn't occurred to her to make a note of it. Then again, she's not writing a book, but if she wanted to, that moment presented an excellent way to begin.


Life is happening all around us all the time, and it's filled with experiences that could greatly enrich our writing. A walk through the neighborhood could trigger an idea that helps round out a storyline. A stroll through the market could unleash a smell that makes a description jump off the page. People-watching at the airport could help you come up with the perfect title you've been struggling to find.


Once you open your eyes, inspiration can be everywhere. You just have to pay attention. And of course, write it down.


I jot down everything, even the idea for this blog post. After that scene in the bar, I thought this topic would be interesting to my readers, so I sent myself another text. I have a good imagination, but not a very good memory.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Avoid Cliches in Your Dialogue

Save the Wordsmithing for Later

1,142 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, writers, writers, writing, writing
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The best way to build your personal brand and drive traffic to your online presence is through original content. This is content that originated on your blog, and it can come in different forms: written post, video, audio podcast, etc. The medium you choose to deliver the content isn't as important as where the content came from: your blog.


Here are three reasons why you should be putting more emphasis on original content to market your brand.


  1. Ground Zero and Social Sharing - We live in a "share"society. Thanks to the explosion of social media participation over the last few years, people are sharing information like never before. If people find a post interesting and compelling, there is a high probability they will share the link to the post with their social network. From that point, there's a chance the sharing will stretch across overlapping communities within social networks across the internet. That original post could become a multi-tethered source to new connections that will build your brand. In essence, original content is ground zero for the potential widespread recognition of your personal brand.
  2. Brand ID - Original content comes from, well, you. Since you are the source of the content, it can add definition to your brand. The content is your thoughts, in your words, using your own personal style. It is a building block to your brand identification.
  3. SEO - Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is a phrase thrown around a lot by online marketing gurus, and they often use it without providing context. Simply put, it means your blog or website is used in such a way that there is an increased likelihood your content will be discovered by a search engine such as Google or Bing. Many of today's search engines give preference to original, informative, content-rich articles, which means your blog or website has a better chance of a higher indexed ranking with search engines. The best SEO practice here is to provide quality original content that moves your blog link up the chain of search engine results.


Even if you are short on time, you can be sure that time spent on creating and posting original content to your blog is ultimately a course of action that will build your brand and help you sell books.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Build Your Brand with Original Content

Can You Choose an Author Brand?

1,996 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, author, writers, blogging, promotions, seo
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The 5 Key Personality Traits of Successful Indie Authors - duolit

In short, being an indie author takes a lot grit and determination.


11 Tips for Cleaning Up Dusty Social Media Profiles -Mequoda

Advice on staying on top of the rapidly changing nature of social media sites.

 

Film

 

Looking to Get Your Movie Made? Filmmaker Michelle Mower Has Some Advice (and She Has A Movie Coming Out, BTW) - Huston Press

To make a great film you have to be an unabashed fan of films.

 

David Cronenberg and Medium-budget Filmmaking - Den of Geek

A look at why it's hard to find financing for mid-budget films.

 

Music

 

Getting Sponsors for Your Music - Music Think Tank

What you should look for in a company that you want to sponsor your music.

 

Which Social Platforms Work Better for What Industry? - Social Bakers

Music falls under the FMCG (Fast-Moving Consumer Goods) category in this informative post.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 7, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - August 31, 2012

1,467 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: author, author, self-publishing, self-publishing, writers, writers, promotions, promotions, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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They sting. They hurt. They feel personal. They are bad reviews, and most of us have more experience with them than we care to acknowledge. They don't even have to be the dreaded one-star reviews to pack a wallop. Sometimes even a three-star review can seem overly critical.


I've been known to read bad reviews over and over and over again in search of the hidden rave within the harsh commentary. It's not that I think I'm above criticism; I've been alive far too long to think that. It's just that I have this artist living inside of me that sees everything I write as something akin to a child. I just hate to see it assaulted in any way. I become as protective as a parent.


But, I also have this practical voice in my head that immediately shouts, "Get over it!" It reminds me that I'm not the first author to get a bad review. The greats, the literary masters, the award winners, they too received bad reviews. No matter how implausible it may seem, not everyone is going to like what you write. The world would be a terribly boring place if we all had the same tastes.


So, here's what you should tell yourself the next time you get a bad review: bad reviews do not equal a bad book. If they did, Moby Dick would never have been called the Great American Novel, and William Faulkner never would have won two Pulitzer Prizes. It won't help alleviate the disappointment right away, but at least you can remember you're in great company.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Be Open to Constructive Criticism

Branding 101: Brand Sabotage

1,956 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, reviews, self-publishing, writers
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I see "who," "that," and "which" used incorrectly pretty much every day, so I thought it was worth a blog post to clear up the confusion. Here we go:


Who refers to people:


  • She is a person who cares about others.
  • You are an author who needs to understand the importance of good grammar.
  • We need to hire someone who can get the job done quickly.


That is used for animals and inanimate objects:


  • They have one of those little dogs that can jump high and catch Frisbees.
  • She works for a fun company that provides free lunch every day.
  • Math is a subject that always gave me a lot of trouble in high school.


Which is used for animals and inanimate objects only when it appears at the beginning of a dependent clause (set off by commas), OR when you've already used that in the same sentence, OR if it's preceded by a preposition.


  • I saw a documentary that featured a company which was about to go bankrupt.
  • His position, which I don't think is valid, is he was acting ethically when he fired her.
  • I'm sorry to be so blunt, but this job is one for which you're simply not qualified.


I know it looks like a lot to swallow, but the rules are pretty straightforward if you stick to them. In a future post, I'll address who vs. whom and whoever vs. whomever. I know those are also a mystery to many people.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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More Grammar Pet Peeves!

Why the Passive Voice Is Hated By Me

2,065 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, writers, writing, grammar, that, who, which
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It seems like for every task out there, you can find someone willing to do that task for a fee. Need your lawn mowed? There's probably a neighborhood kid who will do it at a reasonable rate. Need your car washed? You can pay someone to do it for you. This pretty much applies to any task you'd rather outsource than do yourself, whether for convenience, for someone's expertise, or to save time. But building your brand may be one area where it pays to do it yourself.

 

You could hire someone to represent you online on almost every plank of your branding platform. Some authors pay copywriters to post daily to their blogs, while others enlist help to interact with readers on social networks. But while it's a common practice by some, should you use surrogates to build your brand?

 

In the end, it's your call, but for indie authors, my advice in most cases is a resounding no. It is a shortcut that puts your most valuable asset as an author - your reputation - in the hands of someone else. These surrogates may follow guidelines and rules set forth by you, but the possibility for mistakes being made and misrepresenting your brand are much higher than if you do the branding work yourself. Plus, building a successful brand, especially online, is about authenticity and creating direct connections with readers. Would your fans rather interact with you directly or someone you hired?

 

Now, there may come a time when your brand is so expansive that hiring help to manage it makes sense. In fact, that would be a wonderful problem to have. If such a time arrives, select your brand surrogates with extreme caution. Hire an individual or firm with the same diligence you would use to hire someone to care for your child. And even if you use a brand surrogate, make sure people are only speaking on your behalf, and no one ever speaks for you as you. Transparency is the best way to preserve authenticity, and authenticity is the only way to make a real connection with your readers.

 

In my opinion, your personal brand as an indie author is too valuable to hand off to others. You should safeguard it just as you would safeguard the integrity of your writing. It's that important.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Branding 101: Brand Sabotage

Brand Audience vs. Book Audience

892 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, blogging, writing, promotions, branding
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Feel the Fear - Do It Anyway - Pub Rants

Agent Kristin dishes out some inspiration in this post about pursuing a dream even if it comes with costs.

 

The 7 Rules of Picking Names for Fictional Characters -Writer's Digest

Picking a name for a character isn't a random act. It is carefully thought out and relies on several different factors.


Film

 

Checking the Gate - Filmmaker Magazine

Filmmaker Terry Green talks about the importance of making films that matter.

 

How to Become a Director - Filmmaking Stuff

Jason Brubaker looks at 10 obstacles people encounter on the road to becoming a director.

 

Music

 

Writing Music? 10 Ways to Improve - Renegade Producer

The main thing holding you back could be resistance. Learn how to conquer it and other keys to writing great songs.

 

Kickstarter for the "DIY Musician" with Kat Parsons - Music Marketing Manifesto

Is crowdsourcing a viable option for relatively unknown musicians? Kat Parsons describes how she used it to raise $20,000 to record and market her latest offering.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - August 31, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - August 24, 2012

852 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, author, author, writers, writers, writing, writing, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
1

As a reader, I hate being spoon-fed story elements and character development. I like discovering those things on my own. When an author slaps me in the face by taking shortcuts and announcing outright what is happening with obvious details in a particular scene, I feel insulted. If a writer sets up the scene correctly, the details will find fertile ground in the reader's imagination on their own.


When I examine the great authors I enjoy reading - Steinbeck, Hemingway, McCarthy, Portis, Lee, to name a few - I am informed as much by what they don't include in their stories as what they do include.. They trust the reader. It's possible they don't even consider the reader when they write; they consider the story. A story weighted down with too many unnecessary details will surely sink. Great writers strip their stories of over-elucidation and simply open doorways to familiar emotions and experiences.


Those doorways are opened with details that are seemingly obscure, but in reality shed enough light on a situation to lead readers to draw their own conclusions about a scene. For example, if a husband becomes a widower after 50 years of marriage, don't tell me he's sad. Take me through his morning. Let me see him confronting the empty side of his bed when he first wakes up. Drinking his morning coffee in silence. Walking through his empty house. Noting the tick-tock of the grandfather clock. If you reveal these things to me, I'll not only come to the conclusion that he is sad and lonely, but I'll feel sad and lonely with him.


As a writer, you owe it to your readers to trust them. You do that by not informing them, but letting them inform themselves. Give those details that will lead them to discover what you didn't say.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Look Who's Talking

Use Emotion to Propel Your Story

3,216 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, self-publishing, self-publishing, writers, writers, readers, readers, writing, writing
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Earlier this year, I wrote a post on grassroots marketing tips, and given how much traffic it got, I thought I'd write another one. No matter who publishes your book, it's important that you stay active in the promotional efforts. Here are two things you should be doing on a regular basis:


1. Respond to reader emails.


I reply personally to every single reader email, and I'm always surprised at the reaction I get after doing so, which is usually something along the lines of "I can't believe you wrote me back!" I find this baffling. Why wouldn't I reply? I mean, unless you're getting hundreds of fan emails a day, responding to reader emails doesn't take much time at all. Plus, it's fun! Whether they are contacting you with a compliment or a question about writing/publishing (I get a lot of both), thank them for getting in touch, and don't hesitate to ask them to please tell their friends about your book.


2. Capture email addresses.


It's important to keep track or who your fans are. I recommend using a free newsletter program such as Mailchimp (this also allows people to subscribe on your website), but if that feels too daunting at this point, at least put their email addresses in a database somewhere. When you receive a note from a reader, ask if it's okay to add his or her name to your email list. (Note: don't automatically do so, because you risk annoying that person.) Then, when you have news to share - e.g. milestones in sales, an award won, or maybe even a new book in the works - you'll have a list of people who are happy to hear from you.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Guerrilla Book Marketing Tactic

Your Fans are Your Brand

2,643 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, selling, selling, selling, self-publishing, self-publishing, self-publishing, writers, writers, writers
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The toughest part about building an author brand is taking action. Let's face it, building a brand isn't that complicated. It doesn't require special training or years of intensive study. Building a brand is equivalent to building a relationship. If you make a connection with somebody new or deepen a connection with someone you already know, you've expanded your brand not by just one person, but potentially by all the people that person comes in contact with.


So, your goal is to take action to make those connections that spread your brand. The best way to take action is to log your brand-building activity. My suggestion is to do so in a way that makes you come face to face with your progress every day. Wherever you write, hang a corkboard to monitor your brand-building activity with 3x5 cards. Down the left side, tack up seven cards each with a day of the week written on it.


Now, to make tracking easy, we'll use a plus and minus grading system. When you earn a plus (more on that below), write it on a 3x5 card and tack it next to the day of the week. Same goes for minuses. Your objective is to have more pluses at the end of the week than minuses. And, to make this even easier, you'll have numerous ways to earn pluses (even double pluses) and only one way to earn a minus. At the end of each week, subtract the minuses from the pluses you've accumulated, and that is your score for the week. For example, one minus subtracted from seven pluses is a six plus week. Remove the plus and minus cards from the cork board, and write this score in a branding journal, where you can track your progress throughout the year. Try to beat your total plus count from month to month, quarter to quarter, year to year.


Here's how you earn pluses:

  • Post a link to an article, video, or blog post (that is not your own) on your social media sites and/or blog.
  • Like or retweet a wall post or tweet by a friend or follower.


Here's how you earn double pluses:

  • Write and post an original blog post.
  • Record and post an original video or podcast.
  • Engage a fan in conversation either through email, blog comment, or social network comment section.
  • Make a personal appearance.


Here's how you earn a minus:

  • Do absolutely none of these activities for one calendar day.


You can see that there are numerous ways to build your brand, but only one way to impede the progress on your brand recognition. The key to building your brand is that simple. It just requires you to actively build relationships. Good luck and feel free to share your own brand building activities or weekly score in the comments.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Reverse Journaling for Your Brand

Branding 101: Tools for Branding

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