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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How Winning a Literary Prize Can Change Your Life - The Book Deal

This discussion includes the winner of a self-published book award.

                                                    

7 Secrets to Writing Persuasive Back Cover Sales Copy - The Book Designer

Casey Demchak shares his expertise on writing great back cover book descriptions.

 

Film

                                                        

5 Things Every Filmmaker Should Know Before They Step on Set -backstage

Filmmaker Matthew Perkins believes knowing what you can't do is as important as knowing what you can do.

                                          

16 Big Marketing Ideas for Filmmakers on a Small Budget - Raindance Film Festival

Raindance Film Festival founder Elliot Grove shares his top marketing tips for independent filmmakers.

                                    

Music

 

Infographic: When Is the Best Time To Post On Social Media? - That Eric Alper

According to this infographic, if it's 2 p.m., you have an hour before prime tweeting time ends.

 

Could Flickr Become the Next Big Social Network for Musicians? - Hypebot.com

Is the landscape of social media shifting just a bit?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - May 24, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - May 17, 2013

1,719 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, music, filmmaking, production, movies, writers, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers, social_media
2

As a person with a working knowledge of marketing, I know the importance of identifying your demographic. You have to know which consumers will be interested in your product so you can find them and market to them. That's an easy enough concept to understand. You can't find the group of people you're looking for if you don't know who they are. 

 

Equally as important in this checkers game we call marketing: you have to know your product. If you don't know how to identify your product, you won't be able to identify your demographic. In the world of publishing, we've embraced the genre model in order for an author's work to be categorized and easily identifiable. This genre system allows authors to find readers and readers to find books. 

 

The problem is that authors don't always want to be pigeonholed and restricted to one specific genre. In a weird way, some authors may feel they aren't taken seriously as writers if they are too identifiable with a certain type of genre. We are artists, after all. We don't always like to be reduced to denizens of what can be perceived as formulaic writing.

 

I am of the opinion that you can be associated with a genre and be considered an excellent writer as well. In fact, most bestsellers become bestsellers because they not only succeed with readers of their genre, but they also reach a large group of readers outside the genre. The term for this type of book is a "genre-bending novel."

 

I've read many a genre-bending novel, and they all have one thing in common: they have deep, rich characters that jump off the page. You feel as if you could pass these people on the street they are so real. On top of that, they are fallible and compelling. If you want to succeed in a genre and transcend it at the same time, hone your character development skills and write a genre-bending novel.  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

  

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Show vs. Tell: Do You Know the Difference?

Elements of a Page-turner

2,952 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, writers, genre, craft, branding, character_development, target_audience
1

We hear the word "grassroots" used quite a bit in the world of advertising and marketing. It's a particularly favorite word of political campaigns because it gives the appearance of a movement based on passion, grit, and determination. Money is not the key ingredient of a grassroots marketing campaign. The will of the audience is the primary driving force.

 

Imagine throwing a stone into the water and then watching as the waves ripple out around the point of entry of the stone. That is what a grassroots marketing strategy used to look like. It was something that was restricted to a single location and the waves of popularity rippled out from there.

 

In our highly connected world, grassroots marketing is no longer restricted to a single location; it has gone global. Now imagine taking a handful of stones and tossing them into the water. You're left with dozens of entry points with dozens of waves moving across the water in every direction, some of them even overlapping.

 

That is what a grassroots marketing strategy looks like today. It's your social networking outreach. It's your blog activity. It's your personal video. It's your personal appearance. And it's your consistent interactivity with your friends, fans, and followers wherever you have a presence online.

 

You live in a time where it is easier than ever to build a readership, a time where there are no barriers. The only thing you need to do is demonstrate the passion, grit, and determination that are at the heart of a grassroots marketing strategy.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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How Not to Market

Find Smaller Markets to Sell More Books

19,627 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, grassroots
4

In addition to writing my own novels, I help authors learn how to publish and market books, so I occasionally visit relevant LinkedIn groups to stay current on the industry. One particular group for indie authors was dominated by a self-published author who claimed to be an expert, so all the newbies deferred to him. This man was adamant that writers should not spend a single penny to self-publish. Not a penny.

 

I couldn't disagree more. After a few weeks of witnessing him dispense bad advice to a willing audience, I had to quit the group. It was just too frustrating to watch.

 

I looked up this man's books on Amazon, and the covers were unprofessional and amateur. By the covers alone I would never buy them. That may sound harsh, but it is true, and I know I'm not alone in thinking this way. Your potential readers are busy, and there are literally millions of other books competing for their attention. Case in point: I also looked up the man's rankings, and they were extremely low, so I assume he's not selling many books.

 

If you're going the indie route, hire professionals to help you. In addition to the cover, this goes for interior layout and copyediting. If your book has weird formatting in either the print or electronic version, you're going to turn readers off. And if the copy is riddled with typos and grammatical errors, your readers are going to notice.

 

Cover design. Interior layout. Copyediting. You get what you pay for with all three.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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How Not to Market

Why Print On-Demand?

8,365 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, writers, copyediting, promotions, cover_design, interior_layout
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Gut Check: How Bad Do You Want It? (Publishing Success, That Is!) - DuoLit

Succeeding as an indie author takes a lot of work and sacrifice.

                                                    

10 Things I Learned from Kickstarting My Book - Huffington Post

Author A.J. Walkley reveals how she raised $5,200 through crowdsourcing to launch her next book.

 

Film

                                                        

Very Independent Filmmaking - Supporting Your Habit - NoHo Art District

No financing? No worries. Your drive and creativity are your most important resources when it comes to making a film.

                                          

Zach Braff, Kickstarter, and Financing Your Film For Free - Filmmaking.net

If nothing else, Zach Braff proved that brand recognition is still king of the hill when it comes to raising funds for an independent film.

                                    

Music

 

5 Steps to Becoming a Music Producer - Musicgoat

No shortcuts here. Just sound advice on how to earn your stripes as a music producer the right way.

 

The Difference Between Mixing and Mastering - Musician Coaching

Industry insider Mark Christensen examines the art and business of music production.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - May 17, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - May 10, 2013

2,146 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, music, author, indie, movies, publishing, writing, promotions, music_marketing, musicians, music_production
1

Character and Action

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 22, 2013

I write novels for a living, so I know the process of writing a book is difficult. In fact, it's so difficult it can be maddening at times. But why is it so hard to complete a full-length novel? If you break down the essential parts of a novel, you'll see there are really just two key elements that are crucial to its success: character and action.

 

That's it. Everything else associated with a novel springs from the characters you write and the actions they take. Your plot does not exist without your characters, and plot is nothing without the action that reveals it. The dialogue you use has everything to do with the types of characters you've created, and it's even affected by their actions. Your novel's conflict? You guessed it. Its scope and efficacy has everything to do with character and action. Every time you sit down to write, you are focused on character and action. What are the people I?ve created going to do today?

 

Given that character and action set the stage for everything else in a novel, why is it that we authors sometimes get waylaid by the seemingly insurmountable task of completing a book? How can two components be so challenging to fit together and build a solid story?

 

Here's something to try next time you come face-to-face with writer's block: forget about what needs to be done to finish the story. Live in the moment your characters currently find themselves in and give them actions to take. That's it. Don't worry about where those actions will take you for now. You can sort that out during rewrites. All you need to do is commit yourself to creating the building blocks of your story: character and action. Everything else will follow.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Defining Characters through Action, Not Description

Creative Writing Exercises

2,929 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: writers, characters, fiction, craft, character_development
7

The title of this post may sound extremely obvious, but it's important. I keep meeting people who tell me they want to write a book and/or are working on a book. Most of the time, unfortunately, their talk never turns into an actual book.

 

These folks, who I'm sure truly do want to become authors, remind me of the people I see packing the classes every January at the yoga studio I frequent. They've clearly made New Year's resolutions to get in shape, so they sign up for yoga and jump in eagerly. But by February, they're gone. I imagine they have all sorts of reasons for why they stopped coming to class. Too busy with work/kids/family. Not enough time. Schedule conflicts. Etc. etc. etc.

 

These are all excuses. The simple truth is that yoga is HARD, and it takes a lot of discipline to go to class on a regular basis and get into good shape.

 

It's the same thing with writing. Even if you have a wonderful idea for a book, writing a book is HARD. In addition to the sheer creative effort, it's not like a regular job where you have to show up or you'll get fired. It's up to you to sit down today and tomorrow and the day after that and just write.

 

I once spoke on a panel with a woman who said she approached writing her book the same way she approached training for a marathon. I thought that was a great way to look at it. You can't just show up and run 26.2 miles without training, and a book isn't just going to appear on your computer screen because you really want to be an author.

 

While the "lifestyle of a writer" can sound idyllic because no one is looking over your shoulder, it also requires discipline and self-motivation. The more seriously you take your writing, the more likely you are to succeed.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Think You Can't Write a Book While Working a Full-time Job? Think Again.

More Tips for Completing Your Manuscript

8,117 Views 7 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, craft, discipline
3

How Not to Market

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 20, 2013

I spend quite a bit of time perusing websites and blogs that cater to indie authors. I'm always on the hunt for marketing ideas that will help catapult me into the upper stratosphere of book sales. Over the course of a few hours of searching, I usually find, at the very least, one or two strategies that are worth further investigation. I rarely come away bothered by a piece of advice, but I have to say this latest adventure into the world of marketing for indie authors left a bad taste in my mouth.

 

This marketing advice was not unethical. It won't sully an author's reputation should it be revealed he or she was using the strategy to sell books. It simply requires the author to abandon his or her style and preferred genre in order to capitalize on buying trends. The marketing expert in this case was recommending that authors examine a number of bestseller lists, find the types of books that appear there most often, and write a similar book.

 

What bothers me about that particular strategy? Call me naive or ultra-idealistic, but I believe writing should be done out of passion, not out of an effort to cash in on a trend. When authors write to chase the trend, they usually write without authenticity. Readers know when they're being pandered to, and those authors will probably leave them with an unfulfilling reading experience.

 

As in most areas of the entertainment culture, publishing trends are fleeting. By the time you finish your book that has the look and feel of the bestseller lists you checked weeks or months ago, there's a new trend on the horizon. You may have even wasted a lot of time on a type of book readers are now sick of seeing.

 

My advice? Write what moves you, not what you think moves readers. In the end, you'll have a book you'll be proud of and readers will enjoy.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Build Your Brand with Original Content

Catching the Vanishing Idea

4,651 Views 3 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, marketing, author, promotion, writers
0

CreateSpace and Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) are attending Book Expo America (BEA) May 30-June 1, 2013 and will host several presentations throughout the event. If you're attending the show, we hope to see you in Booth DZ1757!


Click HERE to download a printable version. Unless otherwise specified, all presentations take place in our booth (DZ1757).


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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

7 Ways to Overcome Writer's Block - Writer's Digest

Author Brian Moreland reveals his tips for kicking writer's block to the curb.

                                                    

Lessons Learned From Bestselling Indie Authors on Writing and Book Marketing -The Creative Penn

Advice from the authors who have been there and done that.            

 

Film

                                                        

The Next Steven Spielberg Uses a Smartphone - ReadWrite

There may come a day when the production equipment for your feature film will fit in your pocket.

                                          

Incentives Map - ease

Some states offer production incentives. Check out this interactive map to find out what your state is offering to filmmakers.

                                    

Music

 

5 Best Podcasting Tutorials - Promote Your Music with Your Own Podcast -Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

Need a little airtime? Make your own.

 

8 Ways Musicians Can Gain Media Coverage Indirectly - Hypebot.com

Making bold moves outside of your music career could get you some invaluable media coverage.                           

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - May 10, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - May 3, 2013

1,811 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, music, filmmaking, indie, movies, writers, writing, publicity, films, promotions, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, writer's_block, media_coverage
4

Authors often get bogged down when writing the first draft of a novel. They'll stop and analyze the story. Step back and make changes. Rearrange, rearrange and rearrange. That's all fine and good if it doesn't keep you from completing a novel. If, however, you find yourself unable to finish a first draft because you're constantly looking back, stop. Just close your eyes and keep moving forward.

 

Here's what you need to realize about first drafts of novels: they are supposed to be bad. They are the version of your book very few people will see. My wife is the only person who ever sees the first version of my books, and she's only allowed to see it to let me know if I'm crazy or not. 

 

So, if first drafts are supposed to be bad, why would you spend so much time trying to make it perfect? What's the point? Think of the first draft as a sketch that comes before you take the brush to canvas and give color to your masterpiece. You are working out the kinks by doing what you do best: writing. If you find that looking back only discourages you from finishing a novel, don't look back; look forward. 

 

If you just write with reckless abandon, you'll more than likely have to scrap lines, paragraphs, characters, even chapters, but you should be doing that anyway. Don't spend your time crafting a first draft that will save you from rewrites. Write a first draft that will force you to do rewrites. Rewrites are your do-overs, and they'll still be there for you after the first draft is behind you. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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After the First Draft

AAUGH! Rewrites!

4,452 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, novel, writers, writing, drafts, craft
4

"Show vs. tell" is a cardinal rule of writing, yet most first-time authors don't quite understand what it is. After years of trying to explain this concept, I believe I've finally come up with the perfect analogy: online dating!

 

Imagine this scenario, even if you're not on the market: You sign up for an online dating site, excited to (maybe) meet the person of your dreams - for this post, let's say that's a man. As you flip through profile after profile, you stumble across these two:

 

Profile A: "I'm an attractive, witty, adventurous man with a great sense of humor."

 

Hmmm...who says he's attractive? I'll be the judge of that when I see his photo. And why exactly is he witty? He hasn't said one witty thing. Adventurous? Why is he adventurous? Great sense of humor? Say what? Honey, I'm not laughing.

 

Profile A guy is telling me too much and showing me nothing. As a result I don't want to meet him, because unfortunately he sounds sort of full of himself.

 

Profile B: "For the record, if we hit it off, I'm totally willing to lie about how we met. Just throwing that out there. And speaking of throwing things out there, I recently jumped out of a plane for the first time. Holy frick."

 

Through his words, Profile B guy is showing me that he's witty, adventurous, and has a great sense of humor. And by showing me a photo, he's letting me decide whether or not he's attractive.

 

See the difference? That's what you want to do with your writing. Show the reader, don't tell the reader. Readers are smart and want to draw their own conclusions about your characters.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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The Greatest Example of "Show It. Don't Say It."

Defining Characters through Action, Not Description

9,625 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, craft, show_vs_tell
4

I've attended a few personal appearances both as an author and as a reader. I have observed one major element that separates a successful appearance from a bad appearance, and that difference didn't necessarily have anything to do with the name recognition of the author. It had more to do with the person who was helping the author with the signing that day.

 

I call that person a "reader wrangler." This is an individual who stands a few feet from the author's table and makes sure anyone who passes by knows about the author and his/her book. The more enthusiastic the reader wrangler, the more likely I am to get a book signed. It doesn't matter if I have even heard of the author before.

 

I've acted as a reader wrangler a few times before, and more times than not, I didn't know much about the author or book I was wrangling for. I was more or less a hired hand for the occasion. I got together with the author a few minutes before the signing and asked him/her for their pitch. The more straightforward the pitch, the more enthusiastic I was about wrangling readers for the signing because that told me the author was on the ball.

 

I'll let you in on a little secret: wrangling readers for a signing is actually fun. And for whatever reason, it's never more fun than when the author is unknown. The shoppers/conference attendees are genuinely curious in most cases.

 

So, if you have a personal appearance on the schedule, and you're planning a signing, do yourself a favor and invite/hire the most outgoing person in your life to be your reader wrangler. And please, do them a favor and come prepared with a clear and concise pitch. It will make their job much, much easier and they will be more enthusiastic because of it.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Relay Conflict in Your Quick Pitch

The In-Store Event

9,409 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, promotions, reader_wrangler, personal_appearance
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Use Foreshadowing - Word Play

How to prepare readers for what's to come without telling them what's to come.

                                                    

Feeling Stuck? End Book Marketing Paralysis in Just 5 Minutes -Duolit

Sometimes marketing can be so overwhelming, it's scary. It doesn't have to be.                      

 

Film

                                                        

Don't Blame Veronica Mars: How You May Be Sabotaging Your Film Through (Lack of) Marketing - No Film School

Now that crowdsourcing is being used by the well-knowns, is there room for the rest of us?

                                          

Five Key Tips for Guerilla Filmmakers - Film Directing Tips

Filmmaker Paul Thompson discusses how to make a film on a shoestring budget.    

                                    

Music

 

Independent Musician Gets 200+ Gigs Per Year, Here's How -Promote Your Music

It's all about selling yourself over and over and over again.

 

Cornell Students Using Physics to Predict Human Behavior, Save Lives at Rock Concerts - Live Fix

Science really does rock!

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - May 3, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - April 26, 2013

1,563 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: selling, music, filmmaking, promotion, indie, movies, writers, films, musicians, filmmakers, social_media
0

Let's face it: as novelists, we often have to do awful things. Even though the awful things we do are to imaginary characters in works of fiction, they still don't always come easily. Our jobs are to bend, break, and build characters.

 

I've said many times on this blog that you can't let yourself worry about the reader when you write. Uninteresting novels with flimsy characters are what happens when you write for the reader. You must remain committed to what's best for the story in order for it to be authentic and worthwhile. We all know that sometimes what's best for the story is to challenge characters in unthinkable ways.

 

And this applies no matter what category or genre you specialize in. Let's look at an example from a children's book: how many of us were devastated when E.B. White did not let Charlotte live in Charlotte's Web? Wilbur had to face the loss of his dear friend. He had to experience grief and anguish.

 

Try to think of what would have happened if Charlotte hadn't died. What if E.B. White couldn't bring himself to do that one awful thing and he spared the beloved spider? You'd end up with a story that lacks any kind of depth. In fact, I'm willing to bet the story would have been somewhat of a disappointment, and it likely wouldn't have gone on to influence generations of young readers.

 

Do those awful things, not because you're a bad person, but because it's the right thing to do for your story. Your characters will be richer, your plots will be better developed, and your readers will have a much more fulfilling reading experience for it.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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What Do Your Characters Want?

Peripeteia: Another Storytelling Tool Explained

1,332 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, writing, characters, craft, character_development, character_arc
1

Adverbs are words used to modify verbs or adjectives. For example:

 

  • He is highly paid.
  • She reacted negatively.
  • We cheered wildly.
  • She is extremely friendly.

 

(A trick to identifying adverbs is that they can't stand alone. You can say "She is friendly," but you can't say "She is extremely.")

 

Adverbs can add great color to your writing when they are sprinkled in here and there. But if used too often or in place of crisper descriptions, especially in dialogue, they can have the opposite effect and make your writing appear bland and lazy.

 

For example, which of the following sentences paints a better picture in your mind of what is happening?

 

Scenario A (adverbs are in bold):

 

  • When Susan heard the news, she reacted extremely negatively. "I won't stand for that!" she replied dramatically.

 

Scenario B: (no adverbs)

 

  • Susan stomped her foot twice upon hearing the news and shouted, "I won't stand for that!"

 

Or these:

 

Scenario A (again, adverbs are in bold):

 

  • Jack had been dying to see that movie. "What are you doing with that extra ticket?" he asked Jane hopefully.

 

Scenario B: (no adverbs)

 

  • Jack had been dying to see that movie, so with the best please invite me! look he could muster, he tapped Jane on the shoulder. "What are you doing with that extra ticket?"

 

Do you see my point? Using too many adverbs, especially in dialogue, violates the "show vs. tell" rule of writing, which I'll address in next week's post.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Grammar Tip: She and I, Not Her and I

More Word Mix-ups

11,099 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, writing, craft, adverbs
3

Many writers make the mistake of thinking that bigger is better when it comes to defining a book's target audience. Logically, it seems to make sense: they want to sell as many books as they can, so they want to find the biggest pool of people to market to. That line of thinking is all about the numbers; the bigger the number, the bigger the opportunity to succeed. So the author designs a generic strategy in order to appeal to as many people as possible. They believe that if a potential reader is simply made aware of their book, then surely they'll take a chance and buy it.

 

But by choosing this "big pond" approach, those authors are being overlooked, and they're missing the opportunity to stand out in a smaller pond. What authors should do instead is look for ways to make their target audience smaller.

 

Find an element of your book that will resonate with a specific group of people and reach out to them. What you're looking for is a niche market. Dictionary.com defines niche market as "specialized and profitable part of a commercial market; a narrowly targeted market." The key word in that definition is "profitable."

 

An example of a niche market is fly fishing enthusiasts. Let&rss assume that you've written a murder mystery that features a protagonist who is a master fly fisherman. You'd be well-served to pursue fly fishing blogs, magazines, websites, clubs, etc. Let them know about your book. Offer them review copies. Let them know you're available for an interview, personal appearance, or whatever else they need.

 

You'll have much better success being a big fish in a small pond than a small fish in a big pond.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Passive Marketing is Important Too

It's Not Just a Hobby, It's a Marketing Opportunity

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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Ten Ways Self-publishing Has Changed the Books World - The Guardian

With revolution comes change.

                                                    

From Spark to Story: How Books Get Started -The Book Deal

Finding that magic place where stories come from.              

 

Film

                                                        

Warning: Do Not Try To Make a Movie without Pre-Production - Film Courage

If at first you don't succeed, try, try again...as long as you learn from your mistakes.

                                          

Stay Indie: Develop a Unique Filmmaking Process - Fugitive

Indie isn't just a style, it's a philosophy.

                                    

Music

 

The Writing Voice: Punctuation Communicates! - Judy Rodman

The typo bug infects the music community.

 

The Times Are Changing for Artist Investors - Hypebot.com

Technology not only has changed how music is created and sold, it also has changed the way the industry tracks musicians.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - April 26, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - April 19, 2013

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The life of an indie author is sometimes challenging. I don't mean that in a negative way; life in general should be filled with various challenges. For the most part, challenges help us grow and learn, but some are more daunting than others.

 

The most seemingly insurmountable obstacle that indie authors face is time. It takes time to write a book. It takes time to edit a book. It takes time to market and sell a book. Sometimes, all that time requires a mixture of will power and faith to survive. The will power helps you endure the months ahead of you, and the faith gives you hope that there will be a payoff if you keep plowing ahead.

 

An easier path to take might be NOT to focus on the distance you have to travel to reach your destination. Instead, compartmentalize your journey and celebrate small victories. Write 1,000 words and celebrate. Edit 20 pages and celebrate. Sell your first book and celebrate. 

 

It may be cliché to say, but it's true: the journey is far more important than the destination. If you focus on what you haven't accomplished, you'll most likely miss opportunities to enjoy the milestones that get you closer to your destination. Those milestones are big deals, and they are worth celebrating. With each book you publish, you'll find other milestones to celebrate. 

 

Denying yourself the right to recognize your accomplishments along the way can turn you bitter and derail you altogether. You won't get to your destination because you will have given up long before reaching it. So, here's my advice: block out the distance you have to travel, and just enjoy the journey. 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The ?What If? Notebook

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