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January 2014
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Find the Time to Finish Writing Your Book - Self Publishing Advisor

As time marches on, it seemingly makes it hard to find.        

 

3 Simple Steps for Your Book Promotions Planning for 2014 - The BookBaby Blog

Time to make a book promotions bucket list.   

 

Film

 

Three Ways to Cut Your Movie Budget (and Increase Production Value) - Filmmaking Stuff

Any budget can be trimmed, but at what cost?   

 

Hollywood Producer Says It's Still about the Story in Digital Filmmaking - GCU Today

The platform you use doesn't change the heart of filmmaking.     

                                    

Music

 

Why Do Musicians Always Feel Disappointed about Their Career? - Artists House Music

Shaking off the doubts and getting back to work in the new year. 

 

Music Marketing Podcasts All Bands and Musicians Should Be Listening to - Musicgoat

Stay on top of your marketing efforts with these podcasts.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- January 24, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- January 17, 2014

2,608 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, filmmaking, budget, author, promotion, indie, writers, book_promotion, musicians, filmmakers, movie_budget, digital_filmmaking
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There is a belief among a large number of people that artists only create worthwhile material out of tragedy, that hardship is the engine that drives the creative process. As a youngster finding my way as a writer, I even latched on to this particular philosophy and forced myself into states of contrived depression in order to find my creative force. I wanted to fit the part, after all.

 

But as I've grown as a writer, I've come to realize that the tragedy doesn't have to be my tragedy. In fact, I've never been able to successfully express my feelings about my own personal struggles in a book. However, I can explore the tragedies that befall my characters. It's surprisingly easy for me to deconstruct and lay out on the page.

 

I reject the notion that the only worthwhile artist is the starving artist. I think we all have something to say. Happy, depressed, angry, sleepy, etc., everyone has something to say. That something doesn't necessarily have to belong to us. It can belong to our characters. I would even go so far as to suggest that it should belong to our characters. The writer should be as removed from the process as possible.

 

As you're writing, don't focus on yourself and your emotional state. Try to reach a point where you're nothing but an observer. Don't write what you feel. Write what you see. Give your characters room to be themselves. Your tragedy or triumphs shouldn't be apparent in the stories you write.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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What Do Your Characters Want?

Feeling Emotion for Characters

3,083 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, author, writers, writing, craft
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In a previous post, I recommended doing one thing per day, every day, to promote your book. If you took that advice to heart, you're probably currently in the process of building a "marketing checklist" and might also be wondering what to put on it. In addition to the items I suggested last week, here are three additional ideas to include:

 

  1. Set up a Twitter account. Even if you aren't ready to actually tweet anything, set up an account before you get too famous and someone uses your Twitter name for their account. (Optimism is a good thing!) Using your real name makes it easy for people to find you. My Twitter handle is @mariamurnane.
  2. Add a fun line about your book beneath in the "signature" of your personal e-mail account. If you have a website, include a link to that as well. The signature is typically found in the "settings" section of any e-mail account. Using a signature is a great way to tell people about your book without telling people about your book. My signature says "Best-selling author of the Waverly books, novels for anyone who has ever run into an ex while looking like crap. www.mariamurnane.com."
  3. If you don't have a website, register a domain. (GoDaddy is a good place to start.) I always recommend selecting www.yourname.com, or if that is taken, then www.yournameauthor.com or www.yournamebooks.com. Just like with your Twitter handle, you want to make it easy for your fans to find you. I don't recommend going with www.nameofyourbook.com because what happens when you write your second book? That may sound like crazy talk now, but it is quite possible that one day you will write a second book! (See my above note about optimism.)

 

I know marketing sounds scary for many authors, but remember what I said last week: If I've learned anything about book marketing over the years, it's that persistence pays off, and little things do add up. So take one thing at a time, and keep going!

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Tips for Engaging Your Readers Online

A Few Reasons to Have a Website

13,320 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, promotions
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Offline Branding

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 27, 2014

It's 2014. It feels like nearly everyone is focused on building a personal brand these days. The strategies used are the ones we devote a lot of virtual space to on this blog: establishing an active social media presence, incorporating personal videos and maintaining an author's blog. These are the staples of branding in this age of online marketing. But they aren't the only tools at your disposal. In fact, the online community isn't the only community you can market to. You can take your brand offline and reach people in the real world.

 

Yes, there is a real world out there full of people made of flesh and blood. They talk instead of tweet, and they actually laugh when the occasion calls for it instead of typing out LOL. This world full of actual people is underutilized by authors. It's a shame because it's full of so many brand building opportunities.

 

An offline strategy could include book signings and personal appearances. You could organize writing seminars at your local library. You could even create a fan appreciation night for your genre at a local hangout. You might even find a local theater that's willing to stage performances of works by local writers. The possibilities are endless.

 

Building your brand online is integral to your success as an author, but your local community is just as valuable to you. If you establish yourself in your hometown as a resident author involved in the local art scene, your neighbors will talk among themselves and to their friends online. Your reputation and brand will flourish as a result.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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How to Make a Personal Appearance a Success

Organizing a Public Reading

2,559 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, writing, promotions, branding
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Use Breaking News to Buzz Your Book - Eight Strategies -The Future of Ink

Your opinion counts on matters you devoted your book to, so why doesn't the media know how to contact you?

 

3 Book Marketing Projects to Tackle in 2014 - Duolit

Make the year ahead a productive and fruitful one with these three marketing projects. 

 

Film

 

How to Turn That Passion for Writing and Filmmaking into a Reality - FAST - Raindance

Passion to action. Action to achievement. Achievement to reality.   

 

How Do You Define "Independent Film" in 2014? - Indie Wire

Technology has democratized the film industry and blurred the lines between studio, independent and no-budget filmmaking.     

                                    

Music

 

12 Ways to Make More Money with Your Music - Hypebot.com

Twelve music industry insiders share their best advice on how to bring in the cash with your music. 

 

How to Make It in the Music Business - Judy Rodman

Before you can know if you've made it, you have to define what "making it" is.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - January 17, 2014

Weekly News Roundup - January 10, 2014

2,331 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, filmmaking, sales, writing, book_marketing, social_media, independent_film, music_business, music_production
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I have a book I've been writing for a number of years now. It's not my primary focus, and I only work on it when I've cleared other projects off my plate. This book is a passion project for me because it was something I started during the final year of my mother's life. She wasn't well, and she required care that my sister heroically provided. Mom always asked me what book I was working on ? even at her sickest. On one occasion, I told her about a gem of an idea I had at the time. She liked the idea so much I decided to start writing it. I sent her the pages as I did. My sister ended up having to read them to her because her eyesight was failing. She loved the book, so I kept writing. I wrote without a plan; I just wrote to entertain my mother. Unfortunately, she passed before I got 100 pages into the story, and I still haven't finished the book. 

 

 

It's well over 100,000 words at this point and far from complete. Beyond knowing the book will be broken up into three parts, I have no plan for the story. There are no notes to organize my thoughts. I don't know how the characters will fare or when it will even end. It's the most unorganized writing I have ever done and I probably shouldn't admit this, but I like it. It's fun writing without a really clear path and just discovering these characters as they face situations I have no idea they will face until I am at the keyboard tapping away.

 

 

So here's my question to you, my fellow indie authors: how do you approach a story? Do you know where you're going, or does your day of writing end in utter surprise? 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Keep a Private Journal

You Aren't Your Characters

2,815 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, author, writing, drafts, development, writing_process, craft, writing_ideas
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When I was writing my first novel, I was so excited to be WRITING A NOVEL that I ended up writing a lot of scenes that had nothing to do with the actual plot. But I didn't care because it was so fun to be WRITING A NOVEL! When I finished the first draft I was so thrilled to see my own words on the page that I didn't consider that readers might be confused by the superfluous scenes sprinkled throughout the manuscript. I found them entertaining enough to include simply because I'd written them. That was enough for me.

 

My agent, however, had other ideas. She had me cut out several scenes, gently explaining to me that, although mildly amusing, they had nothing to do with the plot. She also explained, again very gently, that it was important to keep pushing the story forward.

 

I am forever grateful to her for that sage advice.

 

If you're anything like I was when I was working on my first book, you're so excited to be creating an actual book that it's easy to go off on tangents here and there without realizing it. To avoid doing this, I suggest periodically asking yourself questions such as "Is this scene advancing the plot?" or "Is this going to tie back into the story at some point?" Checking in on occasion will keep you from veering too far off track. And bonus: It will also allow you to finish the first draft of your book much faster. In the time it took me to write (and rewrite, and rewrite, and rewrite) my first novel, I've written four more - not kidding.

 

I applaud anyone willing to put in the effort it takes to write an entire book, but while it's undeniably exciting to see your own words on the page, staying focused on the plot will make the process much smoother - and make for a better story.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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What Is a Character Arc?

 

Use Beats to Show, Not Tell

4,320 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, plot_development
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I wish you success. Every indie author who reads this should know that it is my sincere hope that your book is much beloved by a massive number of readers. I want them to be fanatical about your book. May they take to the social media universe and spread the word far and wide about how wonderful your book is. May they give your book as gifts to their family and friends because they are anxious to share its genius with the world. In short, I hope your book becomes a sensation and brings you wealth and recognition beyond your wildest dreams.

 

You should know my desire for you to succeed isn't altruistic. Here's the thing about books: A book rarely becomes a phenomenon without causing collateral success. What I mean is that when readers fall so in love with a book that they can't stop talking about it, they become hungry for more. They want to repeat that feeling. They'll search and search and search until they find it. To put it another way, they'll buy book after book until they fall in love again, and then repeat the cycle.

 

We indie authors are a community that benefits from one another's successes. We should support one another as such. Next time you see one of your contemporaries become a publishing sensation, don't wring your hands and wonder why it wasn't you. Smile and wish the author well, very well. Celebrate his or her success publicly. That author is paving a way for all indie authors. I'm not asking you to endorse a book falsely. If you read it and didn't care for it, so be it. That doesn't mean you can't be happy that they ignited the passion of a large number of readers. That passion will spread to other books, maybe even yours. So support your fellow indie authors - if not for them, for your own sake.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Bring Your Community Together through Writing

2014: The Year of Participation

18,795 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, promotions
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Dominate Your Niche with a Book Blog -The Future of Ink

Here are your three steps to genre domination.           

                                       

Konrath's Publishing Predictions 2014 -A Newbie's Guide to Publishing

Author Joe Konrath lets us peer into his crystal ball to see what he believes is on the horizon in the world of publishing in 2014. 

 

Film

                                                        

88 Cinematographers Share the Best Professional Advice They've Ever Received - The Black and Blue

Be careful. You may know it all after reading this article. 

 

Building A Cinema Camera for Under $1000 - Which Cameras Are Best & Which Accessories You Need - Norm Kroll

You can piece together an exceptional camera for under $1000 these days.     

                                    

Music

 

The Power of a Concert Memento - Hypebot.com

Do you have the merch to leave an impression with your fans? 

 

9 Things Every Musician Needs To Know About the Sound Guy -Digital Music News

Sure he does a killer mic check, but how is he at pulling off a killer sound?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - January 10, 2014

Weekly News Roundup - January 3, 2014

1,872 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, music, self-publishing, movies, writers, sound, publishing, films, musicians, filmmakers, cameras, merchandise, cinematography, niche_market
2

On Being Original

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 15, 2014

Today's post is a question to ponder as you explore and develop your creative writing chops. We all strive to write something different. Whether it's a new spin on an old concept or a character never before seen in a protagonist or antagonist role, we writers want to offer something not seen or imagined before. The question is: Can you be too original? 

 

New is difficult to appreciate. New is foreign, and as a result it's often misunderstood. Traditional publishers and movie studios rarely embrace material that is original for those very reasons. They are afraid they won't receive their return on investment if they try something never done before. It's impossible to know how the consumer will respond to something they've never experienced.

 

The rise of the indie artist has changed the tide dramatically in recent years. Innovative material is hitting the market like it never has before. A few of these books have gone on to find enormous success while still others have fizzled. The beauty of this DIY, inventory-free publishing model is that the artist can take risks with minimal financial investment. Yes, they invest time, but if nothing else, that investment isn't wasted because it goes toward honing the writer's craft. 

 

So as you move forward, remember you are an indie author. You have total control over the material you publish. Don't be afraid to stretch and take risks with the story. Give the reader something new not because they demand it, but because the world needs something new. The story style and structure is still evolving. The evolution of story relies on revolutionary authors who strive to write something original - even if some might call it too original.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Should You Capitalize on Writing Trends?

3 Reasons Original Content is King

19,211 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, writers, writing, drafts, writing_process, craft, indie_publishing, creative_writing, plot_development
2

In a previous post, I talked about character arcs. This week, I'd like to delve into the characters themselves. I like to give mine little quirks. Why? Because I think quirks are what make people real, and I want my readers to think my characters are like real people.

 

Here's an example: I've written four novels with the same protagonist, and once in a while she tells corny jokes. She thinks they're funny, but the truth is they're pretty stupid. (I get most of them from my sister, who gets them from her nine-year-old son.) The jokes are admittedly silly, but I've received many emails from readers telling me how much they love that my protagonist continues to tell them. Some readers have even sent me suggestions for corny jokes to use in future books.

 

Quirks can come in all shapes and sizes. Does your character have a pet phrase? (Think Vince Vaughn in Swingers and "Vegas, Baby") A phobia? (Think Indiana Jones and snakes) A favorite drink? (Think James Bond and "shaken, not stirred") A mild obsession? (Think Monica from Friends and cleanliness). These idiosyncrasies help the characters jump off the screen (or leap off the pages) into the real world. They bring the characters to life, which is exactly what you want. Cardboard people are boring, and cardboard characters are just as uninteresting.

 

One of my favorite characters in my novels is a witty guy who likes to wear T-shirts with equally witty slogans on them. Every time I wrote him into a scene I was excited to find out what his T-shirt was going to say. I wish I could be friends with this guy in real life, I found myself thinking. And I made him up!

 

As you work on developing your characters, think of how you can make them unique. In real life, no two people are exactly alike, but in the pages of your book it's up to you to show the reader why your characters are different. It can seem a bit overwhelming at first, but once you let your imagination get to work, it's not as hard as you might think. Just go with it, and have fun.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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What Is a Character Arc?

Give Your Characters Virtual Depth

2,685 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, character_arcs
1

Form an Author Co-op

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 13, 2014

I'm guessing a large number of people reading this are writers with friends and family who also write. You may even belong to a writers group. I'm also guessing that among your collective of writers there are those of you who have jumped into the world of indie publishing. In other words, you have numbers, and where there are numbers, there is strength.

 

Alone, you are one author trying to break through by finding the right branding formula that will lead to a boatload of book sales. It's a tall order when you're on your own to keep up with the latest and greatest marketing tools and techniques or what's on the horizon.

 

Consider this: Instead of being a one-author operation, why not team up with your fellow indie author friends and become a cooperative, a kind of authors group where you meet monthly and examine each other's marketing strategies? You can share insights on what's worked and what hasn't. You can guide each other through this maze. You can organize group signings, appearances and readings. The possibilities are endless.

 

If you decide to give this a try, my suggestion is to go the whole nine yards. Have officers, take minutes, follow a meeting agenda, etc. Make it a real organization that effectively serves the needs of the authors in your group. Remember, this isn't a group critiquing each other's work. You have writers groups for that. This is a group dedicated to the topic of marketing and branding for authors.

 

Imagine how much easier your journey as an indie author would be if you had a group of other indie authors helping you navigate the marketing world. Authors helping authors: that's how it should be!

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Covering the Convention Beat

It's Not Just a Hobby, It's a Marketing Opportunity

3,285 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, sales, writers
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Brain Function 'Boosted for Days after Reading a Novel' -The Independent

How powerful is reading? It can change your brain.      

         

Doctors Prescribe Books to Treat Depression -GalleyCat

Read two books and call me in the morning. 

 

Film

                                                        

Five Days of 'Her': How to Shoot the Future - Los Angeles Times

Futuristic films don't always have to look futuristic. 

                                          

Super 8 Bounces Back with a New Professional Level Super8 Camera! Analogue Filmmaking is Back! - RedShark

Will 2014 be the year of Super 8 film?   

                                    

Music

 

Best of 2013: Top 10 Ways to Unclutter Your Band Website - Hypebot.com

You can make your website better, neater, and more efficient. 

 

Small Band is Big Business -Musicgoat

Indie is in. Do you know how to capitalize on obscurity? 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - January 3, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - December 27, 2013

2,656 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: website, filmmaking, production, business, music_marketing, reading, bands, music_production
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As you examine the year ahead and formulate your marketing strategy, I have one suggestion for you: Have fun! Just because you take your career as an author seriously doesn't mean you shouldn't enjoy it. If you're mired in tasks that fill you with dread and consternation, don't do those tasks. 

 

Lest you think this is impractical advice and maybe even contrary to advice I've given you in the past, I would argue otherwise. The philosophy I've tried to impart to you over the years is that following a dream shouldn't be filled with wall-to-wall angst. The bottom line is that by writing and publishing a book, you have already succeeded. Doing such a thing takes commitment and discipline that many, many, many others have not demonstrated. You took the desire to write a book and turned it into a published book. That is huge.

 

The journey from here on out should feel like a reward for your efforts, not a list of must-dos to make you a publishing icon. Yes, marketing is the key to selling books, but instead of focusing on how to sell tens of thousands of books, focus your marketing efforts on treating the readers you do have like royalty. Study after study has shown that a majority of people buy books based on recommendations by friends and family. People are more likely to recommend books by indie authors they feel a personal connection to than indie authors with whom they've had no interaction.

 

So, narrow your focus on those who appreciate your work, and you will have fun. As they feel more and more connected to you, they will spread the word about you and your book. Fun will be had by all. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Recognize Your Readers

Book Marketing Tip: Stay Positive

12,171 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, writers, book_marketing, marketing_strategy
2

In my last post, I encouraged you to sit down and write at least 500 words a day. For those of you who already have a book in hand, now it's time to get marketing!

 

Before I was published, I attended a writers conference where the keynote speaker suggested that everyone in the audience do five things every day to promote our work. At the time I thought that was a bit much, and now that I have multiple books out there, I still think it's a bit much. However, if you think doing five things a day is unreasonable, doing one is not. So that's what I propose today for my readers: In 2014, do one thing each day to promote your book.

 

To nudge you along, I suggest putting a daily alarm on your phone that says DO SOMETHING FOR BOOK MARKETING! That may sound silly, but trust me, it helps. That little beep is hard to ignore after a while. Guilt is a powerful motivator.

 

Here are some suggestions to get you started:

 

Monday: Update your author bio.

Tuesday: Take snippets from your best reviews and create a "Praise for (title of your book)" document.

Wednesday: Create a compelling one-line description of your book.

Thursday: Create a compelling one-paragraph description of your book.

Friday: Contact your college alumni magazine about your book using the above materials.

Saturday: Make a list of 10 influential people you want to read your book.

Sunday: Research how to get your book into the hands of the above people.

 

These are just a few ideas that only scratch the surface of the myriad things you could do to promote your book. (There are many more suggestions on my blog if you'd like to have a look.) While the bigger list may seem daunting, the key is to think small, don't freak out, and go one day at a time. If you do just one thing a day to promote your work, soon you'll have done dozens of things, and eventually hundreds. You may not see results right away, but over time those seeds you sow can sprout into prolific fruits. If I've learned anything about book marketing over the years, it's that persistence pays off, and little things do add up. I'm living proof of that. Happy New Year!

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Can You Do More?

It's Too Much!

6,532 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotion
1

I watched a documentary not long ago called Mortified Nation. The title comes from a program held in bars and theaters across the globe where participants stand up and read journal entries from their childhood to a roomful of strangers. Since the entries were written when these people were teenagers, they are filled with heaping helpings of drama, and they reek of angst and longing. There are even a few poignant moments settled deep inside all the side-splitting passages.

 

I came away from the documentary with one definite opinion: Everyone who read from their journals seemed comfortable and confident with who they were and where they were as adults. They knew themselves wholly. Why? Because they had paid attention and explored their lives. In essence, they recorded their own "making of" moments, and they did so with embarrassing honesty. They had no intention of ever sharing these intimate words with anyone, so they actually wrote what they felt, no matter how terrible and unintentionally hilarious those feelings happened to be.

 

I'm of the belief that authors should keep such a journal as adults. I'm not talking about sharing your thoughts and feelings on a blog. Keeping a blog is smart marketing, yes, but keeping a private journal is smart, too. Write in it with the intention of never sharing it with anybody. Explore the frustrations, desires and triumphs of your publishing journey. My guess is that over time, you'll discover what kind of writer and author you are, and as a result, you'll find the path that works for you.

 

Sometimes it takes a little self-examination in life to succeed. A private journal is a perfect way to map where you've been so you can identify what you need to do to get where you want to go.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Storyteller vs. Writer

Should You Write Daily to Write Well?

2,501 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, journaling
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Book Marketing Predictions for 2014 -Huffington Post

Book marketing pro Penny C. Sansevieri shares her outlook for the year ahead.      

                                                    

What Works, What Doesn't in Book Marketing -BadRedhead Media

As with everything, results may vary. 

 

Film

                                                        

University Education: How to Get into Filmmaking - The Telegraph

Knowing who you are and what you want makes filmmaking a lot easier.

                                          

How to Meet Rich People So You Can Get Movie Money - Filmmaking Stuff

It's not just about who you know; it's about who you know with money.   

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Get Your ASK Out There! A Music Career Game Changer - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

Your fans and supporters don't know what to do unless you ask.

 

How to Spot Earning Potential for Your Music -Musicgoat

The key is to diversify.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - December 27, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - December 20, 2013

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I am fortunate to have a wife who enjoys reading my work at its earliest and ugliest stages, and she doesn't just read it to herself; she reads it out loud for me as I sit next to her and absorb the story from a completely different perspective. I've mentioned before that I've been known to record myself reading pages so I can listen back and actually hear my story. I find it to be a valuable tool for writing a better book, but in a lot of ways, listening to my wife read the material is even more valuable.

 

Why? Because she does more than read - she simulates the average reader's reaction to every twist and turn. She asks questions along the way. She challenges my use of a particular word or description and requires me to think about what I've written. At times, I feel very much like a graduate student defending my thesis, and I love it. It is a golden opportunity to consider aspects of my story I may have taken for granted as the author. Forging this type of relationship takes a heavy dose of patience and respect. You won't always see eye-to-eye on everything, but that's okay. You don't have to.

 

If you have someone in your life whom you trust implicitly, schedule some time with them to read some pages aloud. Test the waters. You may have to agree to the dishes or some other chore for a week, but it's worth it. You'll get a true taste of how your readers will see your story, and you'll likely get some invaluable feedback along the way.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Nix Unnecessary Words

How to Get Through the First Draft

3,807 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, book, editing, author, writing, manuscript, drafts

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