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March 2014
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With change come those resistant to change. It's no secret that the publishing industry has changed dramatically in the past five years or so. Indie authors, once a rare breed of scribe, have now become the norm. But indie authors aren't just independent writers; they are independent promoters. Most of them do not have a paid publicity team to spread the word about their books. The initial promotion of a book and an author is left to...well, the author, and if all goes well, the readers chipping in when passion demands.

 

A few established authors who started their journey before the rise of the indies have a hard time grasping this notion of self-promotion. Publicizing one's own book seems a bit tacky and crass to them. Their stomachs turn when authors they count as colleagues take on the practice of promoting their own work on social networks and other venues. But with shrinking marketing dollars in the traditional publishing world, authors' self-promotion has become necessary.

 

I'll let you in on a secret. If I didn't have to do my own self-promotion, I wouldn't. Talking about myself in any forum isn't my favorite thing to do, and I imagine that's the case for 90 percent of the authors reading this. It's just an awkward position to be in. But that is the price of being an author, and it is a small price to pay when you consider I get to write and sell books as a result.

 

Self-promotion is not a dirty word. It shouldn't be looked down upon. It is the hallmark of the independent spirit. Can it be overdone? Absolutely. Striking the balance between drawing the right amount of attention and unnecessarily singing one's own praises is always tricky to find. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't do it. You should. Proudly. The more you do it, the more you'll know where to draw the line.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Promote Your Book with Goodreads

Book Marketing Tip: Make It Easy for Your Fans to Help You

3,419 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, self-promotion
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

 

Books/Publishing

 

5 Writing Lessons Inspired by Famous Writers - Writer's Digest

Did you know Jack London received over 600 rejection letters from publishers? He proves that persistence pays off.         

                                                    

Book Marketing: On Changing Book Covers - The Creative Penn

If a book isn't selling like you expected, a new cover might be the answer.    

 

Film

                                                        

How to Make a Video Using 7,000 Post-it Notes - Videomaker

Stop motion filmmaking isn't just cool. It's a great way to hone your pre-production skills.   

                                          

Do You Invest in Movies? - Filmmaking Stuff

To find investors, you have to know how an investor thinks.       

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Your Most Important Music Biz Relationship - Bob Baker's BuzzFactor.com

You've heard the expression "it's all about who you know." The "who" you should know are your fans.

 

 

How to Get Some Radio Play for Your Tuneage - Musicgoat.com

If you're having trouble getting radio play, don't worry - there are opportunities beyond the commercial market.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Weekly News Roundup- March 21, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- March 14, 2014

3,376 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: selling, self-publishing, indie, movies, writers, radio, videos, films, promotions, inspiration, cover_design, musicians, self_promotion, relatonships
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Write Non-linearly

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Mar 26, 2014

For writers, getting from point A to point B isn't always easy. In fact, it can be painful to get to point B. Writing takes a certain amount of attention to detail. You have to think for every character. You have to keep track of the past, present and future of your fictional world all at once. Simple things like trying to remember if your character already lit a cigarette in the scene you started six days ago will wreak havoc on your writer-mind as you piece your story together from beginning to end. At times, it can be so daunting a task the wheels in your head stop turning and you get stuck, unable to write another word.

 

Here's a tip if you find yourself in such a state of mind: Stop piecing it together from beginning to end. Give up the linear mentality and allow yourself to think non-linearly. If you're stuck on a scene, leave it and move onto another one. Rewrites are for nailing things together in their proper structure. Writing is for putting together the building materials you need to tell the story. 

 

There is no law that requires you to write a story chapter by chapter in the order in which it will be read. You are free to write the book out of order. Don't force yourself to muddle through a chapter just because you want to get to the next part of your book. Simply leave the chapter unfinished and move on to the next chapter. 

 

Writing in a non-linear fashion may be just the thing to finally cure your writer's block.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Can Visualization Help You Finish that Manuscript?

Tips for Finishing Your Manuscript

6,743 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, writers, writing, drafts, development, writing_process, character_development
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Book festivals don't offer the same networking opportunities as writers conferences, but they can still be a good learning experience. (Click here for my post on why it's a good idea to attend a writers conference.) Most book festivals are free, and many offer panel discussions with the same topics as those at writers conferences, so for that reason alone they are worth attending. For example, I've given my workshop called "I want to get published. Where do I begin?" at book festivals at no cost to anyone.

 

In addition to attending panel discussions and workshops, a great way to learn at a book festival is simply to wander up and down the aisles and strike up conversations with the people manning the booths. Most of them will be more than happy to chat about why they are there. Some will be selling books they wrote and published on their own. Others will be representing publishing houses and independent publishers. Still others will be promoting services that may be useful to you at some point, such as writing workshops, design expertise or book marketing help. If you keep asking questions, I guarantee you'll come away with some useful nuggets.

 

If anything, attending a book festival might give you the motivation and/or inspiration you need to finish the manuscript you've been working on - or perhaps to finally start it. Writing is a lonely craft, so taking the time to mix and mingle with those who share your passion is a good reminder that, while you may spend a lot of time alone at your laptop, you're not in it alone.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind and Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Covering the Convention Beat

BEA Part of It: Book Expo America Recap

3,341 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, book_festival
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Fume and Delete

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Mar 24, 2014

Grrrr. You all are going to have to pardon me as I get, as they say, "real" for a minute. There are some things that have been bothering me, and I just have to air them in a public forum so they will live forever in the digital world and eventually come back to haunt me.  My frustration has reached a point of no return. I have to get this out now! Here it goes!

 

And we're back. What? You didn't really expect me to write something inflammatory and potentially career-ending did you? I mean I did write it. You just never read it, and you never will. That's because I practice the "write and delete" method of exorcising my frustrations. 

 

Here's how it works: I come across a blog post, article or social media update that infuriates me. I walk away from the computer fuming. I come back, open Word, and write an incisive and clever response. Then I go about my author duties for the day. Finally, when my day is behind me, I read the Word document with my carefully crafted retort to whatever set me off in the first place. Then, I delete the document. 

 

Why? Because with distance comes perspective. I realize that I wouldn't be adding anything but fuel to the proverbial fire by actually posting what I have written. The need to initially insert myself into the discussion fades because there's literally no need or point. 

 

The next time you come across something that pushes you over the edge, I invite you to try my "fume and delete" method of ridding yourself of angst and frustration. I promise you'll feel better without all the messy regret that comes with actually going public with rabble-rousing remarks. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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When Your Words Offend

2014: The Year of Participation

3,142 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: author, self-publishing, blogging, writing, write_and_delete
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

5 Keep-It-Simple Marketing Tips for Indie Authors - Marketing Tips for Authors

Do you know what your "bumper niches" are?     

 

How to Create Your Marketing Funnel the Right Way - The Future of Ink

Funnels, circles, and books, oh my!    

 

Film

 

Questions for an Open Call Audition - A Moon Brothers Film Blog

Here's how a typical open audition works.   

 

Shoot Something Every Two Weeks: A Conversation with Phil Hughes and Jenn Daugherty - Making the Movie

A look at how a couple of filmmakers are trying to raise funds for an independent feature.     

                                    

Music

 

Two Key Mistakes Your Band Needs to Avoid - Music Makers

The music matters most.

 

How Flight Drummers Got 500,000 YouTube Views in 10 Months - Hypebot.com

A case study on the effective use of YouTube. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- March 14, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- March 7, 2014

3,550 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, filmmaking, promotion, films, bands, filmmakers, marketing_ideas, marketing_strategy
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Antagonists are fun to write because they challenge our personal beliefs. That is to say, bad guys have bad thoughts and do bad things because it is in their nature. But in most cases, those bad things are not in the writer's nature. Creating such a character requires writers to withhold judgment about what's right and wrong and simply observe without comment. It also requires a blind ambition to let the antagonist be as bad as he can be without pointing a figurative finger at him as if to say, "I don't like him either, but he has to be this bad for the story to work."

 

I'll let you in on a little secret: As a reader, I have liked something about every bad guy I have ever written. I dislike much more, but I have always managed to find something that draws me to them. As the writer, I make it a point to neither like nor dislike their behavior, but when I work through the final draft, I put my reader hat on and let the judgment fly. 

 

One strategy I use to create what I deem to be likable bad guys is the same philosophy a debate team uses in academia. I pick a topic, take the position I don't believe in and defend it in a paragraph or two as if I am the antagonist. This is something that will never see the light of day, and it's not always necessary for me to practice it, but it is a go-to when I'm having trouble writing without judgment.

 

In order to write bad guys, you don't have to be a bad guy, but you do have to understand what makes them tick and what they believe in. Putting yourself in the position to adopt opposite beliefs for a paragraph or two just might be the trick to get you in the right frame of mind to create the perfect antagonist.       

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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You Aren't Your Characters

Character Development Lessons from Breaking Bad

5,877 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: writing, characters, creativity, character_development, creating_characters
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I love reading. I read on the subway, before I go to sleep, while waiting for various appointments - all the time! I read both fiction and nonfiction in a variety of genres. I'm not the fastest reader, but I'm always reading something. Not only do I read for education and entertainment, but also because reading other people's work makes me a better writer.

 

Reading good writing is inspiring and educational. When I run across a clever turn of words, or a vivid description that makes me feel like I'm right there with the characters, it motivates me to create a similar effect in my own work. When an author does a great job of developing a protagonist, I want to do the same with mine.

 

I learn from other authors by experiencing the impact of their work firsthand, i.e. as the reader. For example, if you react strongly to a particular scene, ask yourself why. Is it because the author uses a lot of details? Or does the dialogue ring true? Are there a lot of colors? Smells? Actions? Emotions? All of the above? There's no exact formula for writing a great story, just a lot of potential ingredients that - if mixed together correctly - could result in something special.

 

Reading a book you don't like can also help you improve for the same reason, just flipped around. Why don't you like it? What does the author do that bothers you? Pay attention to the answers, and then ask yourself if you do the same things in your own writing.

 

Writing is hard work, and it takes a lot of time to complete an entire book. I recognize that for many authors the idea of spending more time with words on a page, especially ones that aren't your own, might be the last thing you want to do. But I promise it's worth it.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Being an Obsessive Reader

 

The Most Powerful Word

8,905 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, author, writing, reading
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In order to grow, you have to subject yourself to a little self-examination. In the corporate world, managers make their subordinates undergo the oft-dreaded employee reviews. While the process sometimes seems arbitrary, they do serve a purpose. They give employees an approximation of their professional growth. They can see where they've been and where they need to go in order to advance.

 

We all want to advance. As Matthew McConaughey put it at the Oscars, we all need someone to chase, even if that someone is ourselves. In the indie author world, advancing means growing as an artist and selling more books, and just like our corporate counterparts, we need to undergo our own brand of evaluation.

 

I say our own brand of self-examination because, as creative types, we should have a little fun with it. I suggest skipping the checklist of "meets or exceeds" expectations and letting the imagination take over. One of my favorite strategies is to pretend as if I've been asked to be the keynote speaker at a graduation. My job is to describe the life of a storyteller to the gallery of impressionable minds based on my experience. I lay it all out there for them: my philosophy on writing, my struggles, my triumphs, my regrets, my moments of joy, etc. I speak to them from the heart and give them the tools to make their way as indie authors.

 

By doing this exercise annually, you'll be able to track your growth as an indie author, and you'll have a little fun while doing so. Plus, bonus! You'll have a keynote address should you ever be asked to deliver one.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Keep a Private Journal

 

Your Gift to Yourself

3,137 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, self-examination
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Create Characters So Real You'll Be Tempted to Add Them to Your Christmas List - The Seekers

Author Lisa Carter explains how she approaches character building.    

         

8 Reasons Every Book Needs a Business Plan to Achieve Success - Writer's Digest

Indie authors don't need to create a book proposal, but they still need a business plan.    

 

Film

 

5 Tips for Recording Better Location Audio When Shooting As a One Man Band - Norm Kroll

A bad audio capture can ruin a good film.   

 

'3 Days to Kill' Director McG Shares Six Golden Rules of Filmmaking - nofilmschool

Besides having the coolest name in film, McG knows how to make a blockbuster.     

         

Music

 

How Are You Listening to Music? - Musician Makers

An infographic that shows the listening behavior of today's typical music lover.

 

Clever Way to Make Your Song Lyrics More Tweetable - Musicgoat.com

Given the character limitations of Twitter, lyrics seem to be tailor made for tweets.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- March 7, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- February 28, 2014

3,413 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: filmmaking, business, writing, lyrics, character_development, character_arc, music_production, film_location
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I've written about the long-standing "show it, don't say it" rule in fiction on this blog before. It's one of those writing guidelines that's hard to explain to beginning writers and sometimes even more to experienced writers. Often, there is an inclination to write everything you're thinking in relation to a scene or include unnecessary details and long passages of exposition in your story. Neither is good for storytelling.

 

I came across a meme on Facebook the other day that struck me as the perfect definition for this crucial rule of fiction. It was a comment about the role of a teacher, but it's relevant to writers as well. The quote, attributed as anonymous, read as follows:

 

"We can show them where to look, but we can't tell them what to see."

 

To me, that's the essence of storytelling in a nutshell. Not literally, of course. We still have to paint a picture with words. I get that. But showing the reader where to look is describing the location and characters using brief details. You may include out-of-place or striking elements, but do so cautiously. Don't point it out with great fanfare using over-the-top modifiers; simply show it to the reader.

 

For example, you can write a scene in which you draw the reader&'s attention to the crooked smile of a homeless man soliciting for food. There is no need to explain why the man is smiling. Allow readers to arrive at the reason for that smile on their own. The more readers participate in a story by filling in those details you leave out, the more they become part of the experience. 

 

When it comes down to it, we writers have to learn to trust readers to see the details we leave out. That's how you show your readers where to look without telling them what to see. 

 

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Keep Them Guessing to Keep Them Reading

Too Much Exposition

3,758 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, writers, writing, description, drafts, craft, show_vs_tell, writin_process
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If you read my blog with regularity, you know I'm a big advocate of creative approaches to book marketing. However, there's a difference between being creative and being inappropriate.

 

I recently received an e-mail that left me scratching my head. The sender (I'll call him Sam) was writing on behalf of an author I'd neither met nor heard of (I'll call her Sally). In his message, Sam said Sally had a new book coming out, and he asked if I wanted to participate in her "book tour." He included a blurb about the book, plus a link to her website. I had no idea what he meant by "book tour," so I politely e-mailed him back and asked him to clarify. In his response he said that he wanted me to talk up Sally's book on my website. He went on to say that this is "something authors do to support each other," and that Sally would "appreciate my help." He didn't offer to send me a copy of Sally's book to read - he just wanted me to promote it, sight unseen.

 

I wrote back again and asked if Sally had read any of my books or promoted them in any way. Sam did not reply. I'm still confused by all of this.

 

There's nothing wrong with reaching out to others about your book, but Sam is going about it the wrong way. If you're going to ask another author to endorse your book, common sense says you should probably read their book(s) first. You should also offer to send them a copy of your book to read. How would you feel if you found out you'd bought a book based on the recommendation of someone who hadn't even read it? Maybe I'm just old fashioned, but I would feel duped.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Supporting Indie Authors

Marketing Idea: Encourage Your Fans to Spread the Word

7,655 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, promotions
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Blurb with Caution

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Mar 10, 2014

At one time in my life, there was a particular author that I read religiously. As soon as I finished one of his books, I raced to buy his next book or find an old book of his that I had not yet read. I was crazy about this author. Quite simply, he was my favorite writer. On one occasion, when I had no more of his books to read, I picked up random titles in the same genre and flipped through the pages to find something that grabbed my attention. This went on for far too long. I just couldn't find something that pulled me in until I started reading some of the blurbs. Lo and behold, right there between two quotation marks was a glowing endorsement by my favorite author. If the book was good enough for him, it was good enough for me. I bought the book, took it home and cracked it open, ready to be whisked away on a magical fictional journey.

 

 

Two chapters in, I hated the book. It was nothing like my favorite author had promised it would be. I read other reviews online, and most agreed with me. I went in search of another book and found another one endorsed by my favorite author. I didn't like that one either. Turns out my favorite author didn't have a similar taste to mine...or he was being less than honest in his blurbs.

 

Fast forward to the release of his next book - I had no interest in reading it. His blurbs for less-than-deserving books somehow ruined my excitement for his own books. I can't explain it. I just felt like he had violated a sacred trust between reader and scribe. He used his brand to sell bad writing that wasn't even his.

 

 

Consider this a precautionary tale. While it is incredibly flattering to be asked for a blurb by a fellow author, make sure you are endorsing something you truly believe in, and the book is worthy of being associated with your brand. Anything less and you run the risk of tarnishing your own brand and losing readers.

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Sell Yourself as an Enthusiast

A Few Indie Book Review Media Sources

3,174 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, blurbs
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Quick Tips to Help You Tighten Up Your Writing - Catherine, Caffeinated

Author and writing coach C.S. Larkin shares six tips to improve your writing.           

                                                    

Behind the Microphone ? Internet Radio Is a Great Online Marketing Strategy - The Future of Ink

Build your brand and sell books by being a guest on internet radio shows.    

 

Film

                                                        

How to Sharpen Your Movie Hook (So You Get Noticed) - Filmmaking Stuff

How to make investors and moviegoers care about your movie.   

                                          

The Three Rules I Saw Broken at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival - Script Magazine

Technology has created an indie filmmaking revolution, and like any revolution, rules are being broken.     

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Vocal Tone: What It Is, Why We Change It -Judy Rodman

Your vocal tone is a key component of communication, even when it comes to singing.    

 

Music, Mind and Meaning - The Case for the Science of Music  - Hypebot.com

Why do we like music? 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- February 28, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- February 21, 2014

3,537 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, music, movies, writers, writing, drafts, film_festival, writing_process, musicians, fim_editing, vocal_tone
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I have a confession: for the most part, I don't write at a very fast pace. There are times when I can crank out a sizeable word count, but those times are rare. I tend to be deliberate and a tad overly analytical when it comes to writing a novel. I wish that wasn't the case; I'd love to be a much more prolific writer.

 

We live in an age where speed is the order of the day in publishing. Gone are the obstacles that prevented so many writers from getting their books to market. As quickly as you can type your final word, you can have a book uploaded and plugged into the publishing process. Hours or a few short days later the book is available for sale. 

 

I know so many authors who have taken full advantage of this new industry model by publishing seven, eight, nine, or more books in a year. They know the drill: the more they publish, the more books they'll sell overall. 

 

This strategy is not without its critics. The quality of books written so quickly does come into play, and it's a fair discussion to have. The question arises: can you publish too frequently?  Are hyper-productive authors stretching themselves too thin? 

I am of the opinion that publishing numerous books of high quality in a year can be done as long as the author is committed to the writing and not solely the publishing. When you pen a novel with the purpose of telling a story and not with the purpose of having a product to sell, you are writing with passion, and you're writing for the right reasons. The world needs those types of books. If that motivation drives you to publish 100 books in a year, do it. But, if you find yourself panicking because you haven't published in a couple of months, and that panic leads you to forcing a story that's written just for sake of publishing, don't do it.  Instead of helping you sell more books, it may have the opposite effect. 

 

Don't worry if you're not publishing enough, or if you're publishing too frequently. Take a deep breath and honor your nature as a writer. As long as you do that, the success will come.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Most Powerful Word

The Tragedy That Motivates

3,733 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, publishing, writing, drafts, publishing_timelines, author_tips
1

If your biggest fans aren't authors themselves, there's a good chance they have no idea how much you need their help to spread the word about your work. So why not tell them? I created a "buzz" page on my website. It lists easy ways to spread the word about my novels, and anytime I interact with fans on a personal level, I ask them to check out that page.

Here are some examples:

 

1)  My newsletter: Anytime someone signs up for my monthly newsletter, I reply with a personal note asking why they chose to do so. Many are aspiring authors looking for writing and marketing advice, but just as many say they signed up because they love my books. If they're fans, I tell them how important word-of-mouth is and how much I would appreciate their help. For example, I suggest they post something about my books on Facebook. It's important to make it as easy as possible for your fans to take action.

2)  Goodreads: When people begin to "follow" me on Goodreads I also send them a personal note and follow the same protocol as with the newsletter. Most people who follow me on Goodreads are voracious readers and love to share what they are reading with others. They also love hearing from authors!

3)  Twitter: If I see that I have a new follower, I repeat the same protocol mentioned above. My Twitter followers are mix of writers and readers, and they always appreciate a personal tweet.

 

You'd be surprised how happy your readers will be to hear from you - and how willing they are to help you if you tell them you need help. The key is to give them the tools they need, which is why a buzz page is great.

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

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How to Support an Indie Author

Three Easy Marketing Ideas

10,934 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, goodreads, twitter
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Back in my days of writing ad copy for print and electronic media (before the internet and social media), I learned a very valuable lesson about advertising and marketing. As a newbie to the ad world, I mistakenly thought that the ad was the only thing that really mattered. As long as you conveyed your message clearly and created an emotional attachment to the ad, you had done a bulk of the leg work, and you were going to strike gold. But then I saw what came next and realized that the real work had just begun.

 

What came next? The media buy. I knew nothing about the process. As far as I knew, you picked the most popular show you could afford and ran your commercial during that time slot. And as far as print goes, I assumed you picked a spot in the section of the Sunday paper that was most relevant to your product and placed the ad there. I could not have been more wrong. I was in for a real education. Ratings books were consulted. Reader and viewer demographics were pored over. Everything was crucial to the media buy: income, age, gender, occupation, and family status.

 

I learned the buyer wasn't just trying to find a way to reach the most people that fit the demographic; they were trying to find a location (on air or in print) where people in the desired demographic would see the ad over and over again. They wanted people to see the ad seven to ten times. The number of people wasn't as important as how many times the people would be exposed to the ad.

 

So, as you move forward and consider jumping into the world of advertising for your book, keep this little lesson I learned in mind. The key to your ad's success is how many times it's seen by the same people. Being viewed by a large number of people means nothing if they only see it one or two times. It's not about reaching the most people; it's about reaching the right people over and over and over and over again.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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