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3

I'm assuming you've stuck to your word count strategy, and you will have no problem completing your first draft within your self-imposed time frame. You are close to letting third-party readers enjoy the fruits of your creative endeavor. It is time to put out the call for beta readers.

 

Now, the number of beta readers you use is mostly up to you. I say mostly because how many you use depends on the readers themselves. You will find that some who commit to taking on the beta reader role won't follow through. Don't think too poorly of them. They simply don't realize the time commitment they're agreeing to. Their excitement to help causes them to overlook the amount of free time they have to donate to such a task. With that in mind, whatever the number of beta readers you decide you need, take that number and add another 20% to the figure. That will give you some room for dropouts.

 

Here are three quick things to keep in mind as you put together your group of beta readers:

 

  1. Pick the social media site where you are most active and use that as your command central. Connect via private messaging and keep in constant contact with each reader.

  2. Be patient, and don't demand your beta readers to hurry. Give them space.

  3. Create a questionnaire that your beta readers can answer anonymously. Such a tactic will help you get honest, useful feedback.

 

I've written about beta readers a few times on this blog. Here are two posts that go into more detail on how to organize and run a group of volunteer readers: My Beta Readers Experienceand Manage Your Beta Readers.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Stage Two of Writing a Book: Committing to a Word Count

Stage Three of Writing - The Daily Word Count Theories

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4

You've given away proofs. Now it's time to pick a release date. This is the target where you'll concentrate all your initial marketing hoopla. It will feature an explosion of fanfare and excitement.

 

Here are five items to keep in mind when planning your release date:

 

  1. "Release date" does not mean the day it is available for sale ? Much like a brick-and-mortar store does a soft-opening before a grand opening, I recommend doing a soft-release before your official release date. Make the official release date the focus of your marketing (advertising, interviews, press release, etc.), but keep the soft-release as inside information for your online community. When the book is available for sale, send out a breaking news announcement alerting them to buy, buy, buy before the official release date.

  2. Avoid the temptation to just get the book out there. Look for a date on your calendar that is relevant to you, to the book, or to the season. I know you're anxious to get reader feedback, but there may be an invaluable marketing hook that you're squandering in your desire to make the book available ASAP. Think as a marketer, not as an author.

  3. When the release date arrives, take to social media like an author possessed. Pin, tweet, update, blog, and vlog your heart out. Be excited. Be humble. Be grateful.

  4. Use your volunteer sales force (readers) to help get the word out. Find some way to reward them within your means. If that's simply a heartfelt public thank you, share it with the world. If you have deeper pockets, go as deep as you can. It is a gesture they are not likely to forget or let go unnoticed.

  5. Track your sales for the day for no other reason than to evaluate your marketing strategy for the release. If sales are good to great, you have a formula you can repeat for the next book. If sales didn't reach expectations, a new direction is in order. Pick your strategy apart and pinpoint what caused you to fall short.

 

We will get into more detail on item five next week when we examine your final marketing stage, the postmortem.

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

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Stage Two of Marketing a Book: Outreach

Stage Three of Marketing - Proof Giveaway

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17

After years of referring to herself as a "professional dater," a good friend of mine finally tied the knot last summer. She was, of course, joking about her title, but in a way it was true! She was determined to find the right match for herself, so she dated and dated and dated until she found him. To her, meeting the one was essentially a numbers game, and she was right. She played it until she got what she wanted.

 

Book marketing, like sales - and dating - is also a numbers game. If you go into it thinking you're going to strike gold right out of the gate, you're bound to be disappointed.

 

I once met an indie author who had targeted five key people who were in a position to help him spread the word about his book. He had contacted them all and had heard back from two or three of them but was distraught that since then, they hadn't been as responsive as he'd hoped. He was at a loss for what to do, believing his marketing had been a failure.

 

My advice to him (and to any author reading this post) was twofold:

 

1)  Contacting five people is not enough. You should be contacting hundreds of people.

2)  If someone expresses interest in your book and then disappears, you need to follow up! People are busy, and it's not their job to help you promote your book. It's your job to make it easy for them to help you. No one is going to fault you for being too organized.

 

Book marketing takes time and effort, and I know how demoralizing it can be when you feel like you're not making any progress. The key is to be persistent - and consistent. You have to cast a wide net if you want to catch a few fish, so don't give up!

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Connect with Your Volunteer Sales Force

The Power of a Personal Connection

8,154 Views 17 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotion, writers
3

In our last post about word count we discussed the importance of setting a goal early on in the process. For this blog, let's focus on how you're going to reach that goal. Theories abound on the best approach to amassing the words necessary to complete a book-length manuscript, and over the years, I've probably tried them all. Each philosophy has its merits, and there is no right way to reach a word count goal. Here are the three things to keep in mind as you move towards your goal:

 

  1. You don't have to take a daily word count approach. Let's face it: writing isn't just the act of typing. A lot of times it's the act of ruminating over an idea, scene, piece of dialogue, etc. You shouldn't beat yourself up if you let a day or two or three slip by without adding actual words to your story. They're building up in that gray matter of yours. If you're the type that likes to wait until a scene or chapter is fully realized in your mind, that's a legitimate approach. Don't let anyone tell you differently.
  2. The Stephen King approach is admirable but not for the faint of heart. The master of horror has stated that he commits to a daily word count of 2,000 words. That's a hearty pace, and it's not for everybody. During NaNoWriMo, I approached that kind of output, and I have to say I found it invigorating. In a way, it felt like I was in training for a marathon
  3. Commit to a single word a day. I'm not kidding. I love this approach, especially for beginning writers. It removes the pressure of being productive and takes away the anxiety of sitting down to write. The secret here is that once you convince yourself you only have to write a single word a day, you relax and far exceed your. The writer's mind is full of fun ideas, but it';s also easy to trick it into doing some actual work.

 

When mapping out how to reach a word count goal and deciding which strategy works best for you, there are two things you want to keep in mind: your personality type and your timeline. If you work best under pressure and you've set an ambitious release date for your book, obviously high volume output is for you. If the pressure to create makes you less productive and creative, and you're not in a hurry to get your book to market, take your time with a low volume approach.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

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Setting Goals for Your Brand

Got Writer's Block? Step Away from the Keyboard

3,872 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, indie, publishing, writing, craft, word_count, writing_tips, writing_advice
12

Yesterday I received a bulk email from an acquaintance about a book his son had recently self-published. The well-crafted, perfectly appropriate message explained that the son had asked his father to forward a note, written by the son, about the book. The father, conscious of spamming his friends, threw in a line about how any parent would do the same for his kid. He also said that his son was a lot funnier than he was.

 

Who could blame the man for helping out his son? I certainly couldn't. He also used blind copy in the email, a nice touch in my opinion.

 

The forwarded note from the son, however, raised the hair on the back of my neck. In it he explicitly asks people to post a review of his book on Amazon, regardless of whether or not they had or planned to read it.

 

I cringed when I read this. How would you feel if you bought a book because of its positive reviews, only to find out they had been written by friends of the author who hadn't even read it? If you liked the book, you might not care—but what if you didn't like the book? What then?

 

Here's my stance on Amazon reviews: If someone you know reads your book and proactively tells you that he/she loved it, then by all means, ask him/her to write a review. Otherwise, don't go there. It's not illegal to request reviews from friends and family, but to me it borders on unethical. Plus good or bad, you'll feel like a real author knowing your reviews are from legitimate readers. For what it's worth, I joke with my friends that when I got my first hate email, in a strange way I felt like I'd arrived.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Marketing Tip: Follow the 80/20 Rule in Social Media

 

Life Outside of Writing

4,552 Views 12 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions
8

You've documented your book-writing journey, and you've done outreach to other bloggers and reviewers to raise author brand awareness. By now you're reaching that pivotal moment when you upload your files and order a proof so you can get a look at your masterpiece in print before you make it available for sale.

 

When I get to the proof stage, I order the maximum amount and then announce a pre-release giveaway on my blog and Facebook page. Proofs are the perfect marketing tool. They are sneak peeks for lucky winners of your giveaway. They are the catalyst for you to take to your piece of internet real estate and talk about your book with vigor and verve, not just once, but daily during the giveaway period, a period that should last no more than six weeks and no fewer than two. If you have five proofs to give away, my suggestion would be to do one giveaway per week for five weeks.

 

This is a buzz-building exercise. It has to mean something to you in order for it to mean anything to your readers. Don't just talk about it. Talk it up. We authors tend to be introverted, and we can come off as reserved. There's nothing wrong with that, but it doesn't garner a lot of enthusiasm for a marketing event like a proof giveaway. Use as much fanfare as you can muster. Do everything short of throwing a parade when you announce the winners. Actually, if you can afford a parade, go for it. Think of the news coverage you'll get.

 

Next week, we'll enter stage four of marketing with a look at planning for a release date.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Stage One of Marketing a Book: Journaling Your journey

Writing Tip: Use Contractions in Dialogue

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1

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Make a Living with Your Writing - The Creative Penn

Joanna Penn reveals how she turned a passion for writing into a writing career.          

                           

Practice the Process - Retinart

To get good at what you do, you have to know how you do what you do.          

 

Film

                                                        

From the Archives: Famous Filmmakers - Huffington Post

Three filmmakers, known for taking risks, sit down with HuffPost Live to discuss the art and business of filmmaking.        

                                          

DIY or DIE: 10 No Budget Filmmaking Musts - Indiewire

Simple ideas that help you stay under the smallest budget. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Music Marketing with YouTube: Four Ways to Beef up Your Channel - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

The power of video has long been a marketing asset for musicians.  

 

The Many Hats of an Indie Musician - Day in the Life of a Commercial Musician

It's a juggling act, but you get to do what you love.   

 

-Richard

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Weekly News Roundup- May 8, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- May 1, 2015

2,673 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, music, author, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, writing, promotions, musician, music_marketing, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, practice
1

In our second stage of writing a book, we need to establish the miles you'll be logging on this journey. We've discussed word count on this blog before in a number of different ways. Today, we want to establish what your final word count will be, or if not establish, at the very least, estimate.

 

Wait, you say, I've only just begun. How can I possibly know how many total words my book will be? Establishing a word count goal can be tied to many different factors. Genres adhere to unofficial word count parameters. The type of book – novel, novella, or novelette – comes into play when deciding word count. Are you doing a novel and releasing it in a serialized format? That can impact your total word count on a per release basis. You are a factor in establishing a final word count. Are you on a timetable? Do you have an outline that maps out plot points precisely, and in order to keep to your vision, a certain word count works that breaks the unwritten genre rules?

 

Unfortunately, there's no formula for coming up with a definitive word count, but I will say that every time I've set a word count total, I have either reached that total or surpassed it by 10-15 percent. There's something about knowing how far you need to go that allows you to find your pacing.

 

If you want to make an educated estimate, you can search this blog or the internet for word counts based on genre. That is your best place to start before making your final decision.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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General Word Count Guidelines

Stage One of Writing a Book: Idea Exploration

3,749 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, editing, writing, craft, words, word_count, writing_tips, editing_process
9

I recently bought an indie book written by a very nice man I met at a conference a few years ago. He and I have stayed in touch since then, so I wanted to support him and his writing. I really hoped to enjoy his debut novel, but unfortunately I didn't get very far before I put it down for good.

 

The reason? The dialogue.

 

To be specific, no one used contractions, so everyone sounded like robots.

 

Well written dialogue draws you into the story and makes you feel like the people speaking are real. So to write good dialogue, use language that sounds the way people actually talk. And in English, that includes contractions. A lot of them.

 

Quick refresher: A contraction is when you use an apostrophe to shorten one or more words. For example:

 

Did not becomes didn't

Is not becomes isn't

Do not becomes don't

I am becomes I'm

He is becomes he's

 

Contractions aren't often used in formal writing, but they are for informal conversation, especially in the United States.

 

When I read dialogue with no contractions, to me everyone sounds like Arnold Schwarzenegger, and eventually I get so distracted by the unnatural-sounding cadence that I give up on the story. Perhaps read your own dialogue to see if it passes the robot test. I'm pretty sure that if the author of this novel had done so, he would have made a large number of edits before sending the book to print.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Writing Tip: Does Your Dialogue Sound Realistic?

Finished Your Manuscript? Check Your Dialogue

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1

In stage one of marketing a book, we covered sharing your journey and building your community through journaling. For stage two we'll focus on reaching readers outside of your community. This is something you should do before you've finished writing your book. In fact, this is something you should ideally do when your book is still just a spark of an idea. If you've already begun a book, it's not too late to jump on this strategy. Even if your book has been published, you can do an outreach and set the wheels in motion for your next book.

 

The good news is the outreach stage is not rocket science. It will take some research on your end, but the payoff is worth it. You need to be a voice in your genre. It's time to start reaching out to blogs, online magazines (e-zines), mainstream websites, etc. Be an active member in their online communities. Add value to the conversations they start. Better yet, contact the editors and volunteer to provide posts and articles to help bring traffic to their online presence. Be visible, and be vocal.

 

Remember, you're establishing a brand – your brand as an author. Present yourself in a compelling and clear manner that will establish your reputation as a good writer with something valuable to contribute to the community. Most of all be respectful of other members of the community. Allow for criticism and disagreement with your contribution without argument. Respectful counterpoints are fine, but terse, sarcastic responses to such feedback can be devastating.

 

Stage two of marketing a book: Outreach. Find those communities outside of your own that cater to your genre, and start participating as a community member.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Art of Commenting

Today's New Media

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0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The Path to Success - The Passive Voice

Indie superstar Joe Konrath shares his path to success.          

                           

This One Trick Can Revolutionize Your Writing - Enago Blog

A trick than can help any writer of any stripe.          

 

Film

                                                        

Watch: 90-Minute Masterclass with Legendary Director Werner Herzog - The Playlist

An in-depth Q&A with the legend of cinema.        

                                          

Notes to Screenwriters: Advancing Your Story, Screenplay and Career by Authors Barbara Nicolosi and Vicki Peterson - Film Courage

How to implement feedback and make your screenplay stronger. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Practice Logs and How to Include Ear Training in Your Daily Music Practice -Easy Ear Training

Tracking your learning-by-ear progress.  

 

Three Things I Disagree with Speech Level Singing about - How to Sing Better

Should singing be as natural as speaking?   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- May 1, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- April 24, 2015

2,239 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, selling, filmmaking, author, promotion, movies, writers, directors, writing, success, films, directing, musicians, social_media, singing, practice, writing_practice
2

Let's turn the strategy of compartmentalizing to the writing of a book from beginning to end. As I've stated before, reaching a goal is much easier when you break the journey to that goal down into manageable parts.

 

Writing a book begins with the idea. Stephen King calls this the "What if" moment. Essentially, an idea for a book comes to you when you start exploring the possible outcomes of that "What if" question. What if an elderly fisherman in a small boat in the middle of the ocean hooks a fish too big to bring in? I'm not saying Hemingway started with that premise, but that's one way to find the meat and bones of The Old Man and the Sea.

 

You are going to run into fits of inspiration and mountains of frustration as you develop your idea, and if you're like me, that's exactly what the beginning of your book is, an idea. My projects don't usually turn into books until I hit page 40. That's usually the point where the confidence kicks in and I feel like I know where the "What if' is going, and depending on the book, it may take me months to get to that benchmark.

 

The inspiration and the frustration have to be approached with caution. Both can burn you out if you don't control them. Hemingway himself suggested to stop your writing day when you know what's going to happen next. In other words, don't write until the inspiration is gone. And certainly don't stop writing because you feel frustrated. Write anything, even if it's horrible, to break through to the other side.

 

The first stage of writing a book is exploring an idea. Exploration means you will take wrong turns. You will make mistakes. You will doubt yourself. That's okay. You'll find your artistic groove if you keep exploring.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Embracing Inspiration from Real-Life Moments

The "What If" Notebook

4,670 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, idea_exploration, what_if
0

Last week I went out for a drink with a friend of mine who works in finance. His career is based on facts and figures, so he's fascinated that mine relies entirely on my imagination. How do you write an entire book? He wanted to know. How does it work?

 

I explained to him that often when I'm working on a manuscript I don't exactly know what I'm doing or where I'm going, but that I keep at it day after day, week after week, and eventually things begin to fall into place. Things rarely unfold the way I think they will at the onset, but I have to just go with it – and stick with it – and see what happens over time.

 

He nodded and made a simple yet profound statement: "So, you just commit to the process."

 

Yes, I commit to the process.

 

So much about writing a book is just sticking with it over time. Much like losing a significant amount of weight, crafting an entire novel isn't going to happen overnight, or in a few days, weeks, or even months. But if you want to be an author you can't give up, no matter how much you may want to. If you want to reach the end line, you have to stay committed to the process.

 

When my friend made his comment he was simply trying to wrap his head around what goes into writing a book, but I'm grateful to him for the clarity he brought to my profession. To write a book you have to just sit down and do it. You won't write the whole thing today, and on some days you won't write much at all, but if you keep at it, eventually you'll get there.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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A Resolution Writing Prompt

Discipline to Write

4,302 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, book, writing_tips
2

Today we start a series on the five stages of marketing a book. I've always been a fan of compartmentalizing a goal in order to make it less daunting. Cutting things down leads to better planning, which leads to greater success. Our first stage is a way to keep yourself on point and accountable, all under the watchful eye of your public.


 

Find a space in your online presence and commit it as your little plot of virtual real estate where you will keep detailed records of your progress. This is where you are going to say all those things aloud, in public, that you mumbled to yourself in front of your computer as you typed out your masterpiece. Call it an online journal or artist's confessional. Call it anything you want except unimportant.


 

Self-examination is vital to your growth as a writer. Most of us wait until the end of a project to reflect on how we reached our goal. By that time our reflections have turned into happy memories of accomplishment. Journaling while you write allows you to see all the impossible obstacles - before and after you triumphed over every one of them. It will inform you on just how resilient you truly are and how small the impossible really is.


 

It will also serve as a guide for other aspiring writers and help build a community of supporters around you. They will lend you encouragement and inspiration as you overcome the struggles. When the book is available for sale, they will more than likely want to see the results of the journey they were a part of and join you in a victory lap.


 

So, there we have it. Stage one to marketing a book: Keep a journal and start it now.


 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Keep a Brand Journal

Reverse Journaling for Your Brand

6,953 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotion, writing, jounaling
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Book Titles That Sell, Productivity for Authors and Marketing for Introverts with Tim Grahl - The Creative Penn

Book marketing expert Tim Grahl discusses strategy with Joanna Penn.         

                           

Measuring Social Media ROI by @nblackburn01 - BadRedhead Media

Tools to help calculate your social media return on investment.         

 

Film

                                                        

Lights, Camera, Athens: The Art of Filmmaking - The Red & Black

How a small town fostered a filmmaking community in its midst.       

                                          

Indie Filmmaking - Making Money vs Passion Projects -Flickering Myth

How working on both will help you keep your sanity and pay your rent.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

How to Engage a Live Music Audience - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

Advice on how to make your live performances audience-friendly.  

 

The Best Way to Learn Guitar - Guitar Coach Magazine

For beginners just learning and masters wishing to hone their skills.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- April 24, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- April 17, 2015

1,275 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, selling, music, filmmaking, film, author, writing, plan, guitar, films, musicians, social_media, audience, marketing_ideas, marketing_strategy

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