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The Resolution Matrix

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger on Jun 8, 2015 5:16:26 AM

In our world as novelists, we create collections of events, plots, subplots, and conflicts. We lay out a complicated track of incidences that send the reader in many different directions simultaneously. If done right, it really is a magical journey. Think about it. Entire worlds exist in a gathering of words that you've created. There's no weight or material substance to your world of words, but it somehow exists, first in your mind and then in the readers' mind.

 

As creator of this inner-world, you have an unwritten obligation to give your readers what may be the most essential part of a story, resolution. Resolution is the aftermath of the main conflict of your story. What did the final "showdown" resolve? In my estimation, there are two types of resolution and two elements of your story that must be resolved.

 

The Two Types of Resolution:

  1. The Definitive Resolution: Before you type those two little words, "The End," you bring your story to a very definitive end. There are no unanswered questions. You know who did it, and you know why they did.

  2. The Open Ending: As a writer, you're less concerned about answering the unanswered and more concerned with giving the reader ownership of the story's resolution. Or maybe you're leaving the door open to a sequel. The conflict ends, but not all issues are settled.

 

The Two Elements to Resolve:

  1. The Main Plot: Your story has been driven in a certain direction by the plot. It's why your main characters did what they did and said what they said. Each chapter builds toward a conflict that essentially defines your plot and gives it depth. What comes after that conflict is your plot resolved.

  2. The Subplots: Throughout your story, you've sprinkled in subplots to give your characters depth and your story the appearance of real-life chaos. At various points, a number of those subplots will need to have some sort of resolution in order to give them more weight.

 

Resolving a story is one of the most difficult aspects of writing a novel, but when you get it right, there is no better feeling.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Jan 15, 2018 1:47 AM jiya123    says:

What is this resolution matrix all about? It is the first time I am hearing about this term. Is it necessary while publishing the book of your choice? You have mentioned different types of resolution. Try to update the details regarding its purpose. update my browser

Feb 16, 2018 3:49 AM hellenrose    says:

Your post helped me to get some idea about the resolution matrix.I got interested to know more about this resolution matrix. Could you please update it at the earliest? I am eagerly waiting for your updated post to get it. printer problems in windows