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How to Kick-Start Creativity

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger on Aug 26, 2015 5:31:33 AM

Do you feel the creative juices drying up? Has the stress of the day or the week or the “pick your period of time” got you struggling to put down a coherent passage on paper (computer screen)? Never fear because I have just the thing for you. Here are my five cures for those times when you lack the energy to be creative:

 

  1. Free thought time: Find a hobby centered on creativity outside of writing. Get out of the writer head-space, and redirect your creativity to another activity--something that involves a different way to create. Whether it’s photography, sketching, painting, knitting, etc., alternate creative endeavors can give your creativity more depth and distinctiom.

  2. A walk in the woods: Or on a greenway or in a park, walk wherever you connect with nature. Nature can do wonders to reboot your creativity. The crisp air, the smell of the greenery, the thrill of watching wildlife, there are countless ways in the wild to disconnect from hang-ups and kick-start your creativity.

  3. Work it out by hand: Step away from the computer and your normal writing space, grab a pen and notepad, and start writing without judgement. Just let it flow. You will most likely do some of the worst writing you’ve ever done using this method, but the quality of writing isn’t the point. The point here is to clear your mind of all that junk so you can make way for creative excellence.

  4. Meditate: I’m a student of Transcendental Meditation, and I can tell you from personal experience that meditation makes you feel more balanced and less stressed. Sitting in the dark with your eyes closed for 15-20 minutes focusing on nothing is an excellent way to make for a more fertile, creative mind.

  5. Set yourself up to be inspired: A great book, film or play often inspires me to start creating. I find inspiration in the author’s/creator’s talent, and I’m driven to improve as an artist.

 

These are five methods I’ve used to help get the creative juices flowing. What’s your strategy? How do you kick-start your creativity?

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

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Aug 28, 2015 8:16 AM Acallor    says:

I've definitely used most of these (except for meditation). #1 most often, like creating maps for the fantasy world I've created for my books. Fun stuff.

Sep 20, 2015 3:23 AM Jimlad    says in response to Acallor:

I agree about relaxing then starting again. There also seems always to be a sort of 'Je ne sais pas quoi'. The greeks thought it was one of the nine muses. However in our materialistic age we tend to think of the brain. But then the brain is a machine and we still get that idea that there is a 'me' who uses the machine and who needs inspiring.

On the other hand I suggest that Creativity can be taught, or if you will also inspired. Perhpas a bit of both. My father used to tell me stories when I sat with him on Sunday mornings before we got up. They were always adventure stories about medieval knights rescuing people. I was very pragmatic and asked why the knight did not use his sword rather than a knife to cut the ropes.

My mother also read to me and I tormented her to: "Read me! Read me!"

I think this early intitiation into the world of fantasy and of literature led me to write. We had a wonderful Welsh lady headteacher of my Junior School for seven to eleven year olds.Being Welsh she was highly creative herself and all her creativity went into inspiring us young barbarians and civilising us. She encouraged dancing, musice, drama and, of course, imaginative writing. The teachers really loved my stories. Our teacher brought Miss Davis, the head, in to read what I had written. I felt quite honoured but also considered it my due as I knew my stories were the best. I must have been an arrogant child but that came of being the only child of doting parents.

At Grammar school I lost the Muse. It should have been called a 'Crammer School'. Later on I joined the Navy and having Petty Officers shoulting at us on the parage ground did nothing for creativity. However I still read avidly.

Romance then intervened I met my wife and wrote her a poem on our anniversary. Then our children wanted bedtime stories and I obliged, wracking my brains for yet another story about the Three Froggies; which they demanded for nights on end.

I kept on writing. Everyone told me I was wasting my time. I did not believe them. I had an 'I'll show 'em' attitude and in the end I did. My first book was published in 2005, though I had written articles for Christian magazines before that. This was a breakthrough and I have gone on to publishe more, thanks to Amazon Kindle.