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June 2016
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The first wave

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 29, 2016

 

As you devise a marketing strategy for the release of your new book, what role will your first wave play? Do you have a first wave? No?

 

 

Your first wave is your most supportive fans. In the beginning, your first wave will consist of friends and family, but over the course of your career as an indie author, your first wave will grow to include people who know you strictly through your books. They will reach out to you and let you know how much they enjoyed your work. They will ask when your next book will be released. They will spread the word about your books to their friends and families.

 

 

Do not take their interest lightly. Reach out to them and thank them. Include their contact information on your list of first-wave fans. When you start developing your marketing plan for your next book, let your first wave know about your plans. Include them in your strategy. They are essentially the first tier of your volunteer sales force.

 

 

You may even give them an action item. Ask them to let their networks of friends and family know about the upcoming release. Make sure they have all the crucial information: the date of the release, the full title, the book description, the book launch details, etc. Give them the ammunition they need to help you sell books.

 

 

Find a way to reward them. If you're doing a print version of the book, you could send them a pre-release signed copy of the book, or you could gift them a digital copy of the book as soon as it's released.

 

 

Your first wave is your opportunity to supercharge your release. Instead of you acting alone, you will have a team helping you get the word out.

 

 

 

-Richard

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

 

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The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

 

Have Fun with Marketing

 

 

1,102 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, book_release, marketing_strategy, marketing_plan, grassroots, fan_base
1

 

Yesterday I received a rather desperate email newsletter from an indie author in which he essentially begged for people to review his book on Amazon. I empathized with him because I know firsthand how difficult and frustrating it can be to get reviews, especially for self-published books. But then the author did something that made my jaw drop, and not in a good way. In his plea he encouraged us to give his book a positive review--even if we hadn't read it!


I didn't respond to the email, and I won't be reading­, or reviewing­­­, the author's book. As both a fellow author and an avid reader, I'm disturbed--appalled, actually--by his lack of integrity. Reader reviews are supposed to mean something. If they're all just fakes to pump up a friend's book, what is the point? The review system is based on an honor code that should be respected. Maybe I'm old fashioned, but I don't care because I'm also right.


I began my career as a self-published author, and I worked my tail off to find people willing to read and review my first novel--legitimately. Not once did I ask someone who hadn't read the book to review it. The thought never even crossed my mind. I equate soliciting fake reviews to cheating, and I don't cheat.


If a stranger, or even a friend, proactively tells you that he or she enjoyed your book, then by all means, ask that person to write a review. In fact, I encourage you to do so! There's also nothing wrong with asking for reviews via an email newsletter. But there's a clear line between supporters and readers. If you cross that line and ask supporters who aren't readers to post fake reviews, you're sullying the author honor code.


-Maria


 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


 

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Watch for Errors in Marketing Materials

 

Get Reviews for Your Indie Book

 

2,823 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, promotion, writing, marketing_tip, marketing_mistake
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Wants

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 27, 2016

We all have wants. We wake up with them. We drift off into thought about them. We hope for them. We even talk about them with passion and enthusiasm. Our wants define us as much as anything in our lives. They say a great deal about who we are as people.


Do you know what your protagonist wants? I'm not just talking about within the context of your plot and story. I'm talking about the mundane wants that get her through the day. What does he hope for? What wants carry her from one moment to the next?


The same question can be asked about your antagonist. His wants are just as crucial to revealing his true character. Again, I'm not just referring to the wants that are tied to your story. I'm talking about the wants that weave in and out of her everyday life.


Knowing all your characters' wants can help you make a connection with them you wouldn't make otherwise. When you know something as intimate as their wants, you feel closer with them. I know that's an odd thing to say about imaginary people, but it's true. You feel their pain, joy, disappointments, triumphs, etc., on a deeper level, as if they are real people.


Spend some time when you're not working on your story making a list of your various characters' wants. The items don't have to be huge revelations. It could be as simple as what kind of coffee they want to drink in the morning or what kind of car they dream of owning. Just make a list of all their wants, and as you continue to write your story, you'll notice a closeness with your characters that wasn't there before.


-Richard


 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor


 

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Your Characters, Warts and All

 

Write an Obituary for Your Characters

 

1,079 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, writing, character_development
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In 1994, a new form of media began. It was ignored at first, reaching only a select few readers, but over the years that followed it grew and soon became an alternate source of information to the established media outlets. This new media was called blogging, and while it;s grown from sites that were nothing but basic text to sites that incorporate media-rich content, there is one constant that was true in 1994 and that is still true today: original content is king.

 

 

 

    If you want to build viewership for your blog and have it grow consistently over time, you must create original content for the blog on a regular basis. It is the surest way to build not just a following, but a loyal following, and that is the key to brand success. When you are a source of information, you grow your brand through blogging on several fronts.

 

  • You become the sharing point: Your friends and followers link to your site for their friends and followers.
  • You become the starting point: When you prove to be a consistent source of information, your blog will be the first stop and not an afterthought
  • You are the trusted point: With consistency and a growing following, your credibility grows, and your brand grows exponentially.

 

 

 

It is not enough to have a blog. It has to be an active blog that shows a commitment to well written and reliable posts that offer personal insight and useful information. It is today as it was in 1994. Original content is king.

 

 

 

-Richard

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

 

 

 

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3 Reasons Original Content is King

 

 

Build Your Brand with Original Content

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,673 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, blog, self-publishing, promotion, content, blogging, post, social_media, original_content
2

In last week's post I addressed how using too many exclamation marks in dialogue can (negatively) affect the reader's experience. To catch the issue, I suggested that authors read their dialogue out loud.


While that was a post was about an overuse issue, reading your work (not just dialogue) out loud can also help identify another common problem I see in books that haven't been professionally edited: underuse of pronouns.


Too often I encounter writing like the following, which is similar to the language in a book I recently read. Actually, that's not accurate. I gave up reading after about 50 pages because I couldn't take it anymore. I've changed enough words to protect the identity of the author.


In the following paragraph, Lucy is alone:


Lucy crossed her arms in front of her chest and sighed as she gazed out over the water, feeling sad and lonely. It wasn't the first time Lucy had felt this way, but that didn't make it any easier. There was just so much history there, and so much pain. Lucy knew she needed to move on with her life, but she just couldn't.


I find it hard––if not impossible––to believe that if the author of that passage were to read that paragraph out loud, she wouldn't immediately realize how jarring it sounds to hear the name Lucy over and over again. It's clear that the scene is about her, so it's not necessary to keep repeating her name. After the first reference, a simple "she" will do just fine.


If that's not making sense to you, think of it this way: When you tell a funny story about something your dad did when he was on a solo fishing trip, most likely you begin with "My dad was fishing by himself," and from then on you'll use "he" or "him." There's simply no reason to use "my dad" more than once because it's not necessary.


Just like listeners to anecdotes about your dad, readers of your novel are smart enough to "get" it, so respect them! If not, they might not make it past the first 50 pages.


-Maria


 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


 

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Listen to Someone Read Your Story

 

Writing Tip: Be Careful, Don't Overuse Uncommon Gestures and Actions

 

1,571 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: author, self-publishing, writing, pronouns, writing_tip
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A character stew

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 20, 2016

I wrote a play last year that is, I'm happy to say, going to be produced this coming January. I bring it up here because during one of the many public readings, I got the inevitable question about what inspired me to write the story. Specifically, they wanted to know if my characters were based on people I knew.


I cringed at this question even though I knew it was coming. The story is about three siblings: a sister and two brothers. My wife just happens to have two brothers. The story takes place at a vacation home on a lake. My wife's brothers, their wives, and the two of us just happened to have vacationed together on a rental property on a lake. One would think that based on this information you could draw a straight line between the characters in my play and my wife's family. One would think that, but one would be wrong.


The vacation and the family structure in the play were obviously inspired by real life, but the characters in the play and their backstories bear no resemblance to the source of inspiration. I took that week together, and I said what if it were six people stuck in a house together, all with secrets and all with conflicting personalities. That is something that could be interesting. If I chose to write about my wife's family, it would be a boring play full of people being supportive of one another, offering zero conflict to capture the audience's attention.


With this in mind, I answered the question thusly: I don't create characters based on anyone I know. I write characters based on everyone I know. That is the best way I can describe the character development process. I start with a germ of an idea of what a character is like, and then I let my subconscious beg and borrow from all the people I've met in my life, and I create a character stew.


 

-Richard


 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor


 

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A Kramer by Any Other Name

 

When Writing, Don't Outsmart Yourself

 

833 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, characters, character_development
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Brand Buddies

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 15, 2016

 

Do you know why the Wonder Twins were so powerful? Because there were two of them. Forget the fact that I just dated myself by referencing the Wonder Twins, and don't let it overshadow my point. A team is far more effective than a solo act when it comes to branding. Wherever there are two or more of you co-branding yourselves as authors, there are exponentially more friends and followers to whom you are exposing your brands.

 

 

Find a brand buddy (or three or four) and start creating a multi-stream of brand awareness. Interview one another. Actively engage one another on the other's social media platform. Highlight one another's triumphs. Find genre-specific topics to have a friendly debate about. Just create your own universe where both or all of your brands share the love.

 

 

 

A podcast is a perfect vehicle for this type of strategy. You and your brand buddy can co-host a regular show and talk about genre-specific topics. John and Hank Green have built co-brands by engaging in "conversations"; via video segments. John will devote a few minutes on camera talking directly to his unseen brother Hank, and Hank will release a video doing the same with John. They are really very entertaining, and each have used the strategy to succeed as entrepreneurs and, in John's case, as a bestselling author.

 

 

 

The brand buddy strategy is a far more rewarding way to build a brand. You reap the rewards of finding success and at the same time, you build a support organization that will help you stay focused when things get rough. Find your brand buddy and start co-branding today.

 

 

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

 

 

 

 

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Is podcasting right for you?

 

 

Form an author co-op

 

 

 

 

980 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: podcast, campaigns, branding, social_media, author_marketing, author_brand, author_collaboration, author_platform
3

 

I recently met a very nice indie author who was kind enough to give me a signed copy of her debut novel. I liked her a lot and really wanted to like her book too, as I'm always rooting for indie authors (and of course am always looking for a good read). Unfortunately, however, I didn't make it through the first chapter before giving up and moving on to the next book in the stack on my nightstand.

 

One of the main reasons I couldn't continue reading her novel was the dialogue! In nearly every conversation, more than half the sentences ended with exclamation points! Lots and lots of exclamation points! The effect was that everyone sounded like they were shouting at each other! So much shouting! Why were they shouting?! In real life, people don't shout at each other that much! Or at least that's my opinion.


Do you see how annoying all those exclamation points are? Certainly there is a time and place for them, but you don't want to use too many. Think of it like adding salt to your food; a tiny bit is good, but too much ruins the meal.


Granted, there were other issues with the novel in question that also sapped my interest, but all those exclamation points certainly didn't help.


One strategy for ensuring that your dialogue sounds realistic is to read it out loud. I'm pretty sure that if the author in this case had done so, she would have quickly noticed the over-salting situation she'd created. In fact, reading dialogue can also reveal other issues that might otherwise escape you, such as the lack of contractions. (In a previous blog post I talked about the robot effect that creates.)


You want readers to focus on your story, not your punctuation. So save the exclamation points for when they're really necessary.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Avoid word repetition

 

Writing tip: does your dialogue sound realistic?

 

 

 

 

1,148 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, punctuation, dialogue, grammar, character_development, grammar_tip, author_advice, grammar_advice
5

I have a love/hate relationship with rules when it comes to writing. I'm an artist. Rules, I once believed, were the destroyers of art. I know now that rules are the sparks that twist the creative mind into finding solutions to be artistic without breaking the rules. One must find the creative wherewithal to adhere to the rules while remaining true to one's artistic sensibilities. That is a neat trick when it's pulled off.


To that end, I would like to introduce you to my four rules for writing a novel. They are my own personal guidelines that help me be consistent while forcing myself to be more creative.


  1. A protagonist has to have a dark side: I just think heroes are more interesting when they aren't perfect. I don't like characters that don't have to face their own moral dilemma at some point in the story. It helps me dive deep into character development and paint a more realistic picture of the good guy (that's the gender neutral form of "guy").
  2. Warts are more interesting: I don't connect with beautiful people, mainly because I can't relate. My stories rely heavily on my characters' imperfections. Warts are far more fascinating to me than beauty marks.
  3. Conversations don't follow a straight line: In real life, when people talk to one another, they don't always listen to one another. The dialogue veers from alternate point to alternate point before the original point ever finds its footing. This is the type of dialogue I like to include in my novels. It's more realistic, and it gives the characters more depth.
  4. Know the ending before you start writing: While I have created outlines, I don't believe they are necessary in order to write a novel. I do think it behooves you, however, to know the ending of your story before you start writing, or at the very least, before you meander pointlessly until you finally figure out what your story's about. Knowing where you're going helps you build steps to the ending.


These are my rules for writing a novel. What are yours?


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor


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When do you know the ending?

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1,788 Views 5 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, craft, rules_for_writing
0

 

There is something about going to an event and being an active participant that makes it more special than if you're just a passive participant. When you take part in an event, you claim part ownership in that activity. You invest yourself.


As an author building a brand, you may want to keep this in mind when you're planning an event. Instead of doing a standard reading or signing, plan something that requires those who attend to participate. Gear the activity around elements of your book to create a natural tie-in of course, but break out of the standard mold and be bold.


Perhaps your book is a suspense novel about a cross-country runner being stalked in the woods. Why not get with a local charity and organize a fun run with you as the host and ads for your book on every scrap of paper and signage. Maybe a cat or a dog plays a major role in your novel. Why not organize a small un-adopted pet pageant with your local shelter to raise awareness for both them and you.


These are just random ideas, but you get the point. Find an activity and cause that have associations with your book, and create an environment where attendees have to participate. Such a strategy will create a buzz among those attending and their cadre of friends and followers online. It will give all an opportunity to share pictures and videos from the day's festivities, spreading word about your brand even wider.


Remember, people are having fun when participation is required.


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

 

 

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Preparing for a Personal Appearance

 

How to Make an Author Event Eventful

 

1,414 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, author, events, author_brand
0

If you're an aspiring author, get ready to hear the following question approximately 10 billion times:

 

"What's your book about?"

 

As you already know if you've already written a book, pretty much everyone and anyone in your life will ask you that question, from people you know well to people you just met in the waiting room at your dentist's office. So it's really important to be able to answer it quickly.


Short and sweet.


Make it count.


Pique their interest.


You get the point.


If you start describing your book as, "Well, it's kind of hard to explain, but...there's a good chance that you've already lost the interest of whoever is on the other side of the conversation. If your pitch grabs someone';s attention, however, he or she might whip out a smartphone right there and then to order your book on Amazon. That's happened to me many times, so I'm not just saying that in a "you never know" kind of way. Trust me; I know! Every interaction you have is a potential sale.

 

While it's critical to have a concise, compelling description of your book when it's available for purchase, having one as you're writing it is also important. Why? Because it ensures that you have an interesting plot. Trust me, I know this too, because I recently spent way too many months struggling to write a novel for which I never had a clear vision. I should have realized that I was in trouble early on because anytime someone asked me what I was working on, I found myself uttering the dreaded "Um...well it's hard to explain, but..."


You know what happened to that manuscript? Nothing! Once I (finally) realized I didn't have an interesting story, I pulled the plug on it. It was a painful lesson to learn, and I wish I'd read a blog post like this one to save me a lot of time and effort. So please, learn from my mistake!


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing Tip: Know When to Be Concise

How to Craft a Compelling Book Description

1,241 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, author, indie, pitch, descriptions, elevator_pitch
0

Bad writing habits

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 6, 2016

Before you can address a problem, you must first recognize what the problem is. Take ownership of your bad writing habits. Face them, and overcome them. It's not easy to either identify them or conquer them, but with persistence, it is possible.

 

To set an example and kick things off, I'm going to list my bad writing habits and my best solution for each. Some of you, I'm sure, will relate to my list.

 

  1. Procrastination: It is the writing demon I struggle with the most. The focus it takes to write is exhausting, and sometimes the thought of diving deep into a story tires me out before I even sit down at the computer. I have found the best way to overcome procrastination is to split my writing day into fours. I commit to writing a modest number of words--500 or so--each session, and then I walk away feeling good about reaching my goals.
  2. Lazy writing: I know grammar, and I know how to spell. Most of the time I avoid major mistakes, but every once in a while, I'll get lazy and let typos and bad grammar slip through, and it is embarrassing. It was really a problem in the early part of my career. I've learned to read and re-read and re-read everything I write now before I commit it to submission. And when I read, I do so aloud
  3. Doubt: Whether it's questioning my skill or my choices, doubt always seems to creep into my writing time. It creates the hardest bad habit to overcome: over-thinking. It's not something you defeat right out of the gate. It takes time for a writer to gain confidence enough to trust his or her instincts. The trick is to keep writing and hone your skill.

 

Bad writing habits are pesky little buggers, but with self-awareness and determination, you can overcome them.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

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2,611 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, writing, craft, writing_tips, authro_adivce
0

Social media is a fairly ubiquitous term these days. It encompasses a vast array of virtual space and includes hundreds of millions of people. An author can easily get lost in the clutter of brands trying to get noticed. What you need is a social media influencer to champion your brand! That is, you need someone with their own well established brand to make their followers aware of your author brand.


A social media influencer isn't just somebody who has a large following, and that's too bad because those individuals are easy to find if you just do the smallest amount of research. A true social media influencer has the right kind of following--that is to say, one that is relevant to your author brand. As an author of a genre, you are most likely a fan of that genre outside of your own work, which means you may already be participating in a group dynamic with one or more social media influencers, and you just didn't know it.


Social media influencers pride themselves on being innovators, early adapters, and trendsetters. They want to know the newest offerings in their world. You will be doing them a favor by contacting them and letting them know about your book(s). Don't be shy. Normally, indie holds a special place in social media influencers' hearts because it gives them a greater chance of being the source influencer, meaning the word starts with them and gives them more credibility. Think of social influencers as a news agency trying to get the scoop. You are the scoop.

 

Find social media influencers who are relevant to your author brand, and who have a large, loyal following, and give them the opportunity to discover your work.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

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Building an Author Brand: The Author Brands You Promote

 

Mingle Marketing

 

 

 

 

1,291 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, author, branding, social_media, platform, author_brand, author_platform, social_media_advice
0

That vs. which

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 1, 2016

On the heels of my post about when to use "who" vs. "that," today I thought I'd address an equally thorny differentiation: "that" vs. "which."

 

Mind you, somehow I managed to receive a degree in English without learning the difference between "that" and "which," so don't feel bad if you have no clue. It wasn't until I was in graduate school that my friend Debbie laid it out for me, clear as day.

 

Here's what she said: If it sounds like you could use either, use "that."

 

For example:

 

*Cooking is an activity that relaxes many people (CORRECT)

*Cooking is an activity which relaxes many people (INCORRECT)

 

In the above sentence, to the untrained ear it may sound like you could use either. So given Debbie's justification, "that" would be the correct choice. And guess what? It is!

 

Wanting a more formal explanation for what Debbie had told me, shortly after our conversation I did some research, and here's what I learned:

 

Essential clauses, which can't be removed from a sentence without changing its basic meaning, require "that":

 

*Cooking is something that I do all the time.

 

If you remove the essential clause above, you'll be left with:

 

*Cooking is something. (CHANGES BASIC MEANING OF SENTENCE)

 

Nonessential clauses, which can be removed without altering the basic meaning of the sentence, require "which." (Note: these type of clauses, such as the ones I've written above, are set apart with commas.)

 

*Cooking, which I love, is relaxing.

 

If you remove the nonessential clause above, you'll be left with:

 

*Cooking is relaxing. (DOESN'T CHANGE BASIC MEANING OF SENTENCE)

 

Got it? I know this is tricky, so if you're more confused than ever, see if the clause in question is set apart by commas. That should help you figure it out!


-Maria


 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


 

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Refer vs. Recommend

 

 

Is It "I" or "Me"? Use the Switcheroo Technique to Get It Right

1,043 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, self-publishing, writing, grammar, capitalization, author_advice, grammar_advice

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