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From Monroeville to Literary Legend

 

This year brings the 50th anniversary of the literary classic To Kill a Mockingbird. The book is an enduring coming-of-age story that set the bar for all coming-of-age stories that followed it. The author is as reclusive as the book is loved. Harper Lee, still living, has shied away from the limelight for decades, not even granting an interview to one of her biographers, Kerry Madden. Madden did the next best thing to interviewing Lee; she combed the streets of the author's hometown, Monroeville, Alabama, and talked to the people who know her as Nelle. She wrote about her visit to the small Southern town in the Los Angeles Times.

 

One story that didn't make it was how Lee chose to attend the University of Alabama Alumni Assn.'s first Capital Capstone Award ceremony in 1963 instead of the Cannes Film Festival for the screening of the film version of "To Kill a Mockingbird." The award was for "the graduate whose distinguished contributions to the national scene during 1962 have reflected the best traditions of this university." Legendary coach Bear Bryant was there, and Lee told a reporter: "Bear talked about literature and I talked about football... I was a rabid football fan long before I was a writer."


You can read the entire article on the Los Angeles Times' website: On the trail of Harper Lee

 

 

"Blue Velvet" Director Turns to the Web to Finance His Bio-Doc

 

The man who has made a career of making surreal films and television shows has decided to bypass Hollywood to make his next film. David Lynch is turning to his fans and the Internet to raise funds for a documentary about his career. It's known as crowd-funding and it used to be a tactic employed by unknown filmmakers. But the times they are a-changing. More and more high-profile filmmakers are joining the crowd.

 

Jon Nguyen, the producer for the film, Lynch Three, said he wanted to "give something back" to the fans who were being asked to donate money. "A film can take a long time to finance so we had this crowd-funding idea. We went to David Lynch for his seal of approval and he was up for it. He ended up making an abstract self-portrait and we're going to give an original print of it to anyone who chooses to donate $50 towards the film, or a T-shirt featuring the print. We hope to raise part of the money in this way," he said. The film will form the third documentary in a trilogy following Lynch's career and the making of his 2006 psychological thriller, "Inland Empire," starring Laura Dern and Jeremy Irons. As well as receiving the print, the online donators will have the chance to influence the content of the film, including the questions they would like documentary-makers to put to Lynch about his life and work.


You can read the entire article on The Independent's website: Too Hollyweird for Hollywood? David Lynch asks fans to help fund his movies

 

 

Why Make Music?


It's likely a question you've heard from a family member or friend at some point in time. The life of a musician is hard, and oftentimes there is very little reward. Your loved ones are dying to know why you put yourself through it. You struggle to find the perfect answer. So, why? What drives you to live the life of a creative type? John 'Scott' G of Golosio Music Publishing recently tried to answer the question.

 

Still, the query does kind of hover in the atmosphere like fumes from a high school science lab experiment, mocking and challenging composers and performers alike. "Why make music?" Well, okay, here's a way to approach it: You could just as easily ask: why make anything? Artists are compelled to create. They still need to eat, have a place to sleep, and get around the town from time to time, but let's face it: Writers write. Singers sing. Actors act. Sculptors sculpt. Dancers dance.


You can read the entire article on Music Industry Newswire: Is Music in Your DNA?

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - July 23, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - July 16, 2010

1,527 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, selling, book, music, film, self-publishing, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, musicians, filmmakers
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Your author blog is the most crucial cog (yes, I rhymed) in your personal branding efforts. In my mind, it's more important than even the social networking sites because it is your platform. It's your online home where you control the conversation and play host to your fans. I know it seems like the World Wide Web is overcrowded with blogs, and that's true to a certain extent. But most blogs fail, so that means there's plenty of room for quality blogs. Most people fail at blogging for one reason: they lose interest and let the blogs lie dormant for weeks or months at a time. You can't build a consistent following if you don't update your blog frequently. That means you should post on your blog once a week at the very least, and a couple of times a day for the most ideal results. Content is king. The more you have, the more traffic it will bring to your blog. Here are a few authors that I feel do it right:

 

Alexandra Sokoloff - Sokoloff has a bit of a niche. Her blog is centered on adapting novels to screenplays. She's a published author, and she has a background in the film industry. She offers some great information, and she's been pretty consistent about updating her blog since it was created in 2006.

 

J.A. Konrath - Konrath is the king of transparency. He's known for being a straight shooter and gives his readers detailed information on everything from writing to the exact number of books he's sold per title. He uses his blog as an educational tool for all those interested in writing and the publishing industry.

 

John Scalzi - Scalzi is as transparent as Konrath, but he has a greater range of topics he covers on his blog, which he has titled Whatever. The slogan for his blog is "Taunting the Tauntable since 1998," and never has there been a truer statement written. Scalzi is provocative, entertaining, and informative, and there is no one better at adding content to a blog.

 

These are just three authors that I think get it right when it comes to blogging. They all have one thing in common - consistency. The key to succeeding in blogging is consistently adding useful content week after week.

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Engage Your Community

Blogging - "Why would anyone care what I have to say?"

2,447 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, blog, promotion, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, craft, branding
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Do You Write Like a Literary Icon?

Ever been asked who your literary influences are and didn't know what to say? Maybe you have too many influences to choose from, or it could be that you write in a totally different genre than your favorite authors. Well, now you don't have to give an arbitrary answer, because now you can let science tell you who your literary influences are. The website I Write Like has developed an algorithm to tell you...well, who you write like.

 

The inner workings of I Write Like are invisible to the user, so it's impossible to know for sure whether the thing that makes you write like Charles Dickens are long, long, comma-connected sentences or use of 19th-century vocabulary. Check it out, and thanks for reading this Dan Brown-style post.


You can read the entire article on the Los Angeles Times' website: Who do you write like?

 

 

Break These Rules at Your Own Horrifying Peril

Audiences have come to expect certain events and stereotypes in their horror movies. It would take a brave filmmaker to break those rules. Or it could just take a smart filmmaker. What makes a scary moment scary is that it's unexpected. Your horror movie should catch people off guard. Here's an example of one rule to break.

 

Stay away from the local Sheriff. In a horror movie, the only character with a lower life expectancy rate than a teenager is a cop. Furthermore, if the lead characters try to tell the Sheriff about the gruesome goings on, most likely he 1) doesn't believe them; 2) is in on it; or 3) tries to help, but meets a gory death seconds later (Examples also too countless to mention).


You can read the entire article on Indie Film Chat: Top 10 Rules for Horror Movies

 

 

How Would the Beatles Fare In Web 2.0 World?

Sure the Beatles were talented musicians. And, yes they were incredible songwriters. And, it is true they were at the forefront of a revolution in rock music. In short, they are legends. But does that mean they could make it in today's music business?

 

Today, even the road doesn't look the same. Members of Led Zeppelin aren't riding through the halls of a Los Angeles hotel on motorcycles. Van Halen isn't insisting on a bowl of M&Ms in its dressing room with all of the brown ones removed. Today, the vast majority of artists don't have tour support from major record companies and have to go out-of-pocket in order to ply their trades beyond their home bases. They look to MySpace and other social networking outlets to get the word out about appearances, and about the actual music they make.


You can read the entire article on the Today Show's website: Would Beatles make it in today's music world?

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - July 16, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - July 9, 2010

1,359 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, selling, book, music, filmmaking, film, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, films, musicians
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

 

Books/Publishing

 

     The Top 5 Websites To Spark Your Creativity - makeuseof.com

Here are five writer's block-busting sites for your viewing pleasure. Inspiration abounds.

 

     Secrets To Successfully Marketing Fiction - Author Marketing Experts

PR expert and author Penny Sansevieri gives a brief history of her efforts to market her own books.

 

Film

 

     DIY Super Hero Mask Tutorial: Backyard FX - Indy Mogul

Whether you've suddenly developed superhero powers or you want to shoot a movie about one, here's a cool tutorial on how to make a latex mask.

 

     Video Shorts Are the Hottest Video Production Style Today - Film Making Seminar

Corporate shorts are a fast growing segment of the video production business. Use your filmmaking skills to create anything from training videos to branding videos.

 

Music

 

     Creative Rehab: How It Happens, When To Act On It - Hypebot

Can you run out of creativity, or is it a never-ending supply? Creativity comes from large and small inspirational moments.

 

     Musicians Don't Make As Much Money As You Think - BeatCrave

Ever wonder how much money a musician for a label makes? How does $23.40 for every $1000 in sales sound?

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup ? July 13, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup ? July 6, 2010 Edition

1,354 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, film, self-publishing, indie, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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If At First You Succeed, Watch Out for the Sophomore Slump!

The publishing industry is full of hardboiled business types with their noses to the grindstone, running business by the numbers; but unfortunately, the industry is not completely devoid of silly superstitions. There are some who believe that for those authors who have a successful debut novel, there is no way they can avoid the second book jinx. Publishing Perspectives studies the challenge of the follow-up novel.

 

Greer Hendricks, vice president and senior editor at Simon & Schuster, believes that the second book can often be the author's most difficult: "The first book is in an author's head for years. Often, it's been with them since they were a child. If the first book worked, there's pressure to match that success. If the first book didn't work, there's pressure, because an author can begin to second-guess herself. And from a business standpoint, we now have to overcome a writer's 'bad track record.'"


You can read the entire article on Publishing Perspectives: The Second Book Conundrum: Selling It, Writing It, Publishing It

 

You Can Fix It in Post as Long as You Planned to Fix It in Pre-Production

Flying by the seat of your pants in the world of filmmaking can be expensive, not to mention it's not that great for your pants. Planning for every eventuality before you hire your actors and pick up a camera can save you money and headaches. Even planning your post-production strategy is crucial to smooth sailing in the movie biz.

 

Before shooting a single frame or pixel, the first decision any independent moviemaker should make is to scout an indie-friendly, post-production facility. Achieving success cannot occur without tediously planning for the end of the production. It becomes increasingly pertinent when working with tighter time constraints and the budget of an independent film, where the margin for error can make the difference between an enormous success or a disgraceful failure.


You can read the entire article on MovieMaker's website: Post-Production Starts in Pre-Production for Indie Moviemakers

 

Do the Opposite of Marketing?

Bruce Warila of Music Think Tank argues that the key to achieving fame in the music business is to basically not seek it. He thinks you can't make yourself successful online because the internet has become so large and unwieldy that it's hard to control your brand and image. He believes that you should just let your fans do it for you.

 

Given these eight relatively recent social and technical phenomena, the only three things you have to get right now are: 1) incrementally improve your songs or a song, until it is, or they are, all over the Internet (via the efforts of fans); 2) incrementally improve your live show to the point where fans are asking you to turn up the volume; and 3) learn how to throw an ongoing party that keeps people coming back week after week, or month after month (to be covered in my next post). If you give fans great songs, a great show, and a great party... they can and will do everything else now. Everything.


You can read the entire article on Music Think Tank?s website: Eight Recent Social and Technical Phenomena That Are Making Your Music The Only Thing That Matters To Your Success.

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - July 9, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - July 2, 2010

1,337 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, film, self-publishing, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing


     Selling Shovels - Moriah Jovan

Author Moriah Jovan posts her random thoughts on publishing in a very entertaining and coherent manner.


     A List of Literary Agents on Twitter - Rachelle Gardner Agents

Literary agent Rachelle Gardner has put together a handy list her colleagues on Twitter.


Film


     10 Most Expensive Mistakes Filmmakers Make - Raindance

No social media plan and no sales strategy are just two of the mistakes Raindance Film Festival founder Elliot Grove thinks filmmakers should avoid.

 

     Write Faster with Sporadic Writing - Director Tom

Instead of trying to make a script fit together from beginning to end, maybe it would be more effective if you write scenes out of order and then piece your story together with your completed scenes.


Music

 

     Do You Use a Marketing Match or a Flamethrower? - Bob Baker's The Buzz Factor

Setting the town on fire with your music marketing strategy is a good short term solution, but what do you have in mind for the long term?

 

     Don't Forget to Breathe - eleetmusic

Bogged down in a long recording session? Cramming in too many gigs in a week? You need a little recharging, and that may just be a breath away.

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - July 6, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - June 29, 2010 Edition

1,418 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, films, promotions, filmmakers
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In Between Projects

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jul 8, 2010

We've all been there. You spend weeks, months, maybe even years working on a book and then suddenly you type those two words you've longed to type for so long, "The End." There's an immediate feeling of relief, followed by a sudden rush of exhilaration that usually leads to the need for a nap (okay, maybe the nap part is just me). The question is what do you do when you wake up from that nap and your next project demands to be written?

 

In a lot of ways, being a writer is like being an explorer (without that pesky risk of dying). You are living life in the extremes, albeit internally, but still research has shown that our brains don't know the difference between the real dangers we face or the imagined ones. We still have the same biochemical response. The same goes with the deep feelings of love we assign our characters or the grief we make them face or the unseemly things we make them do. That's why writing fiction can be draining. We authors are visualizing the story before it's committed to the page, and we're even reliving it while writing it, rewriting it, and rewriting it again.

 

So, my advice is to give yourself a brief respite between projects. Let your brain cool down, and celebrate the fact that you've "graduated" from your previous story. Do some reading. Write for a blog. Have some fun. I've found that it's usually during this period of unwinding where I come up with some of my best ideas for a future book project. Don't rush into the next book. Let it sit for a while. That way you can go into it with a clear head and renewed enthusiasm. 

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

You Have More Than One Book Inside of You

Trading One Kind of Stress for Another

522 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, selling, book, self-publishing, fun, writers, blogging, writing, craft, danger
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Selling Mark Twain

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jul 7, 2010

I found a fascinating item this week concerning Samuel Clemens' methodology for selling books written under his one and only pseudonym, Mark Twain. It seems his publishing company employed "subscription agents" that presold copies of his books door to door. These salesmen used a prewritten sales pitch and sample pages to make the sale. The policy was to sell 40,000 copies of the book before it was even published. What was the benefit of buying a Mark Twain novel before publication? The lucky reader got better binding than those poor souls who waited until the book was on the market.

 

I don't know why, but it never crossed my mind that one would need to market Mark Twain. After all, he's Mark Twain, and even in his day, he was considered a great writer. He was a legend during his time, but as great as he was, neither he nor his publishing company rested on his success. In short, they treated his books like any other manufactured good you would sell. Not only that, they used what we call "crowdsourcing" today. They pre-sold books and got the funding in place before they printed them. Bands and filmmakers have been doing this for a while now by creating Web sites where fans can donate money toward the completion of their next project.

 

You get the feeling that if Mr. Clemens were around today, he would be a master at blogging and social networking. You can almost imagine him Tweeting excerpts of his latest book or chatting with fans on his Facebook page. Better yet, he'd probably have a YouTube channel featuring his own style of personal videos. In short, he'd be doing everything that you should be doing to sell your personal brand.

 

If you'd like to find out more about Mark Twain's subscription agents you can click here: Canvass of Mark Twain

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Selling the Self-Published Author with Kinetic Marketing

My Top 5 Book Marketing Sites

1,471 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, book, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, craft, branding
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

     It's Never Too Late to Start Writing - There Are No Rules

What do you do with 35 years between you and your last writing assignment? You start writing again.


     #163 - Query Shark

Want to see an example of an almost perfect query letter? Look no further than example #163.


Film


     Guerrilla Filmmaking Tips for Micro-budget Filmmakers - Learn Film Online Blog

An abundance of passion for filmmaking can overcome a lack of cash. You just have to do what you do best: be creative.

 

     YouTube Play - YouTube

Want a chance to showcase your filmmaking skills at the Guggenheim Museum? Check out YouTube's Play competition.

 

Music

 

     Giving Music Consumers These 3 Choices Leads to More Revenue - Hypebot

Variety is not only the spice of life; it's also the key to selling more of your music to the public. Bob Baker explains.


     Top 10 Music-Based Facebook Apps - Indie Music Tech

Still trying to find the perfect music app for your Facebook profile? Look no further. Indie Music Tech is here with a list of the top 10 music apps.


Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

 

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - June 15, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - June 8, 2010 Edition

1,238 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, selling, book, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, promotion, movies, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, films, musicians, craft, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How Travel Renews Your Writing Life - There Are No Rules

Need a little spark to get those creative juices flowing? It might be time for a vacation to bombard the senses with some adventure and relaxation.


Writing Fiction: Can it be Done? - Living a Life of Writing

Freelance writer and blogger Rebecca E. steps out of the world of nonfiction and wonders if it?s possible for anyone to write fiction.


Film

 

Iron Man 2 Robot Repulsor Arm : How to : BFX - Backyard FX

It would take a lot of money to duplicate just some of the simplest effects in Iron Man 2, right? Not according to this nifty special effects tutorial put together by the BackyardFX team.

 

Tribeca Film Festival: Can Social Media Help 'Indie' Filmmakers Make It Big? - FilmSlate

The film industry is all about the buzz. The Internet has changed the way buzz is generated for films. A panel at the Tribeca Film Festival took on the topic of building buzz in a social media driven world.

Music

 

Auto-synchronization of Metronomes - Synthgear

Call it the great metronome experiment of 2010. Five metronomes started at different times remarkably begin to swing in unison.


Songwriter Voice vs Performance Voice... Do You Know The Difference? - Judy Rodman

According to Judy Rodman, the voice you use to write a song is different than the voice you use to perform a song.


Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

1,250 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, film, self-publishing, movies, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, musicians, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

     It's All Just A Game Away - Literary Rejections on Display

We all need a little levity to go with all that rejection. Why not play a little Rejection Bingo and have some fun?


     The Value of the Verbal Pitch - Rants and Ramblings

Are you prepared for that once in a lifetime chance meeting with a literary giant? How will you sell your book to the person that matters?


Film

 

     The Perception Filter - Projector Films

Should films take a cue from video games and start incorporating more Point of View shots in their productions? Screenwriter Tim Clague thinks it's an idea worth exploring.

 

     Jon Reiss on Proper Prior Planning Prevent Perplexing Problems - Truly Free Film

Jon Reiss encourages his fellow independent filmmakers to focus on finding an audience for their film not making a film for a specific audience.


Music


     Facebook Song - Rhett and Link

One has a beard without a mustache and the other has a mustache without a beard. Both have a special affinity for Facebook that can only be expressed in a song.


     The Evolution of PC Audio - Synthgear

There was a time when a computer that dinged every time you clicked on something made it state of the art. Now, computers and audio have revolutionized the music industry. 


Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

418 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, filmmaking, film, self-publishing, movies, writers, blogging, musicians, filmmakers
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Book marketing is as much about keeping up with trends and scouring the internet for the latest developments in all things marketing as it is about implementing your own marketing plan. It's important to know not just what's going on in publishing, but also what's going on in the world of marketing. To that end, a plethora of websites and blogs out there offer book marketing gems of varying worth. Here are five sites that I have found to have a lot of valuable tips and tricks for authors interested in selling more books.

 

John Kremer's Book Marketing Tip of the Week - John is an expert's expert in the field of marketing for books. He's a best-selling author who is probably best known for his book 1001 Ways to Market Your Books. He has all of his past marketing newsletters archived, where you will find a virtual catalogue of useful tips to boost your marketing efforts.

 

Author Marketing Experts - Penny Sansevieri has 15 years' experience in the field of book promotion. She works as a consultant and publicist for an impressive list of authors. The name of her site alone suggests she understands that it's more about marketing the author than the book.

 

The Creative Penn - Joanna Penn, a Brit in Australia, dishes out plenty of sound advice on her site for today's author. She covers the gamut when it comes to books, but she devotes a lot of her virtual space to examining the world of marketing books and authors.

 

Gary Vaynerchuk - If you like your marketing expert to be dull and timid, then Gary is not the guy for you. He is the epitome of high energy, and he funnels all that energy into videos about the world of internet marketing. You'll be entertained and informed just by spending a few minutes with Gary every week.

 

Social Media Examiner - Founded by Michael Stelzner, this online magazine is geared toward helping businesses master the art of using social media, but there are a lot of great tips for authors trying to build a personal brand, as well. You can keep up with strategies and new tools to help get you noticed on social media sites.

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

801 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, book, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, branding
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

     Fantastic Book Marketing: A Great Example - Publetariat

Author and blogger Joanna Penn examines the marketing efforts of author P.W. Singe after her husband was motivated to purchase his latest book.

 

     Three Steps to a Breakout Story - Plot to Punctuation

Want to write a compelling novel that will leave people in awe of your storytelling talent. According to editor Jason Black it's all in the goals you set for your story.


Film

 

     reddit.com Interviews Felicia Day - reddit

Television and Web series star Felicia Day answers questions from her fans and discusses her online strategies to succeeding the film industry.

 

     Negotiating Is a Producer's Life - All About Indie Filmmaking

Producer Jane Kelly Kosek sums up the key to developing your most crucial skill as a producer in one word, experience.

 

Music


     A Brief History of the Blues in Modern Music - 1960s Psychedelic Hippie Culture and Music

You need more that sweet lowdown lyrics to make a Blues song. You need that bluesy sound that only a guitar can make.

 

     Everybody is a Music Maker - Indie Music Tech

Digital Music guru Dave Haynes examines the history and future of music at a TEDxCardiff event.



Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

450 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, musicians, craft, filmmakers
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In recent weeks, I've sat on the online sidelines and watched an author acquaintance battle with readers over his political views, or perceived political views. It all stemmed from a negative review wherein the reviewer didn't like the book because of a throwaway comment made about a news organization's political bent. Aside from the fact that the reviewer didn't know that what is written in a work of fiction doesn't necessarily parrot the author's personal views, the thing that most surprised me was that the author chose to respond to the negative review.

 

The response in and of itself was not the problem. It was well thought out and non-combative. But what followed his response was a string of more combative responses from the author's devoted fans. That was not the author's intention, I'm sure. He thought he was merely clarifying the reviewer's misconceptions, but the reviewer saw it as a collaborative attack by the author and his fans. It turned into a flame war that made all parties look bad. And, in my view, the author got the worst of it because he's the one trying to build a personal brand and a career.

 

His personal brand took a bit of a hit because he chose to respond to a negative review. It wasn't his response that did the damage. It was the responses written by his fans coming to his defense. That is the lesson here. We all have a desire to right a wrong when it comes to our books. It's natural to want to go there, but no matter how perfectly worded and nice your response is, you have no control over what follows, and like it or not, you will be linked to those comments made by well-meaning fans trying to defend you if you've already publicly responded.

 

Next time you're faced with a negative review, take a deep breath and let it go. Don't risk your personal brand by defending yourself. Plenty of bestselling books have gotten bad reviews. You have great company.

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

1,777 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, book, self-publishing, writers, blogging, writing
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing


     How to Build an Audience Around Your Blog - Blogussion

An author blog doesn't just need traffic. It needs an audience. Here are 5 tips to create traffic and build an audience for your blog.

 

     The One Sentence, One Paragraph, and Two Paragraph Pitch - Nathan Bransford

Your job as an author isn't just writing books. As much as you may not like hearing it, you have to write summaries of you book, as well.


Film


     How to Make the Move to Hollywood - Joke and Biagio

Hollywood producer Biagio shares five tips on how to successfully make the transition from Main Street, USA to Tinseltown.

 

     Zach Braff Discusses Acting and Directing - Making Of

Actor and director Zach Braff discusses the difficulties he faced when making his movie Garden State. His key to pulling it off was to ignore the naysayers.

 

Music


     Woody Norris: Inventing the Next Amazing Thing - Ted Talks

This TED video features what might be the greatest invention in audio since the phonograph. Wood Norris has invented a device that doesn't use a speaker to project sound. It uses the air next to your ear.

 

     Science Friday on Perfect Pitch - How To Practice

Ever wonder how perfect pitch works? Are you the one in 10,000 that has perfect pitch? Here's an interesting piece on the science behind perfect pitch.

 

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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