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135 Posts tagged with the blogging tag
1

Even back when blogs were called "online journals" people used their own private little chunk of Internet real estate to showcase their fiction. "Flash fiction" found a forum in which it flourished, and with the advent of sites like Twitter, shorter forms of fiction called "micro-fiction" also took hold. Some writers simply seem to enjoy the challenge of writing an entire story in as few words as possible.

 

But blogs, both the micro and macro variety, also gave birth to an entirely new way for writers to build audiences for their long-form work. Writers, new and established, began to serialize novel-length fiction on their blogs and social networking sites. The premise for serializing is simple: you regularly post a segment of your book on your blog or wall or account until the entire book is posted. Those who have utilized the practice have found benefits besides just attracting readers. Many of the readers they've attracted have provided invaluable input and constructive criticism. These new readers have become the first leg in the word-of-mouth campaign for the print or e-book version of the novel. In short, readers of serialized novels online tend to take ownership of the story because they've been there since the beginning.

 

With that being said, serializing a novel on a blog or social network isn't for everyone. Some writers worry that giving books away for free in such a forum is a mistake that will deter book sales. They reason that readers will not buy a book when they can read it for free online. My own personal belief is that a reader is more valuable than a sale in the long run. Readers, no matter how they came to read the book, will spread the word for you. Over time, readers will help generate the sales you desire.

 

Here are few tips on how to serialize your long-form work on a blog or social network:

 

  • Keep your posts brief. I personally think 500 words is a good word count to shoot for. Any longer and you risk scaring the reader away before he or she starts reading.
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  • I recommend ending each post with a hook or cliffhanger. Give your online readers a reason to return for the next post.
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  • Give yourself a posting schedule for your story. At least once a week is ideal. The same day of the week each week works best. If you can post it at the same time of day, that would be even better.
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Serializing a novel takes a certain degree of patience from the author. You're not always likely to get feedback, or you may be deterred from posting a segment that you feel isn't as interesting as previous posts or upcoming posts. You have to proceed with an almost noble sense of faith that you're creating both a compelling story and a loyal following.

 

What are your thoughts on serializing work? Would you ever try it?

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Need to Blog, but Short on Time?

Authors' Four Structural Essentials for Blogs

3,234 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, blog, blog, blogging, blogging, branding, branding
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


Why Less Detail Makes More Believable Characters - Plot to Punctuation

Writing should be similar to that familiar refrain about a beer, less filling with great taste.


Colin Robinson & OR Books: Handselling Online - GalleyCat

Learn how one publishing company is taking a real life brick & mortar practice of selling books and making it internet friendly.


Film


Cost Effective Film Production For Shooting Commercials - iarticle.org

Shooting commercials is a great way to raise money for your indie film, and it's great training for running a film shoot.


The Process behind Filmmaking - Blog Dawn

Find your objectivity in a script you're passionate about so you can create a flawless film.


Music


Twitter Gets More Music Friendly, Embeds Radio - Hypebot

This post points out a few music services that have teamed up with Twitter to make their songs more accessible to the Twitterverse.


Obvious to you. Amazing to others. - Derek Sivers

Don't overlook those seemingly silly songs you've written. They may be deceptively brilliant.


-Richard
Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - December 7, 2010 Edition
Tuesday's Blog Roundup - November 30, 2010 Edition

1,530 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, filmmaking, filmmaking, promotion, promotion, writers, writers, blogging, blogging, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
0

Last week we talked about the benefits of Facebook and how authors can use it to network and build their personal brands. Second in our series of social networking site overviews is Twitter. Twitter quickly went from what some considered a "passing fad" to a legitimate communication tool for business and personal use. It is unique in that it only allows users to post messages - or "tweets" - of 140 characters or less, therefore it became known as a "micro-blogging" site. Here are a few vital Twitter stats:


  • Twitter currently has an estimated 89,800,000 unique monthly visitors
  • The most current numbers reveal that the age group with the biggest presence is 25-34
  • Women make up 55.8 percent of the users
  • 72 percent of Twitter users take action when exposed to advertising
  • The average user spends more than 17 minutes per day on Twitter
  • 18 percent of all Twitter users access the site several times a day


Given the character restrictions, creating a tweet that catches someone's attention can be a real challenge. Actually, I find it to be a great creative exercise. If you can hone your writing skills to convey a meaningful message in 140 characters, just think of what you can do when there are no such restrictions.


You are striving for the "retweet" as an author with a presence on Twitter. A retweet is the act of one member passing along another member's tweet to his or her own followers. In essence, this helps your tweet and your name go viral, increasing the chance that others will be influenced by the message and even join your network to follow your tweets directly. Tweeting famous quotes is an excellent strategy for generating retweets. I did this with a series of Shakespeare quotes, and I got a lot of retweet action. Sharing information - such as breaking news or interesting articles and blogs - with your Twitter followers is also an excellent strategy for building your brand on Twitter, especially if the content is relevant to one of your target audiences.


I also use Twitter to drive traffic to my blog. I've set it up so that every time I update my blog, an auto-tweet goes to my followers with a link back to my blog. I usually get a pretty good response from my Twitter followers with this tactic.


Unlike Facebook, most of my Twitter followers are people I met on Twitter. We didn't have a past relationship. I joined two years ago, and I still get at least one new follower a day. It really is a great place to meet new people to add to your word-of-mouth campaign. The key to making Twitter work for you is to use it frequently, as in a few tweets a day (enough to be active without risking annoying your followers). And don't be shy about replying to and retweeting others' updates - if others see you joining in the conversation, they are more likely to engage with you themselves.


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Social Networking Tour - Facebook

Social Networking Sells Your Brand

2,590 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, blogging, blogging, blogging, blogging, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, social_media, social_media, social_media, social_media
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Creating a blog is easy enough to pull off these days. All you need is an Internet connection and the ability to express yourself in relatively short posts. Maintaining the blog is a little more tricky because that requires finding the time to post on a frequent and regular basis. Occasionally, it's tough to squeeze in precious minutes between work schedules, meetings, family time, etc.

 

Luckily, there are some labor-light posts you can put together on those days you can't find the time to create an original post. In fact, you may even create a day of the week or month that you devote to these types of posts. Let's face it, we can't be creatively "on" all the time. These types of posts will give your brain a break and still allow you to put fresh content on your blog.

 

1. Video Posts - Thanks to sites like YouTube, Break, Brightcove, and others, you can find tons of video content to post on your blog. Whether you want to include something outrageously funny, intensely inspiring, or fundamentally educational, there's probably a video out there to match the overall theme of your blog. The videos you watch and enjoy enough to share says a lot about your personal brand.

 

2. Polls - Everyone loves to participate in polls. They're interactive, they're fun, and they give us a way to express our opinions. Thanks to sites like PollMonkey, addpoll, Mister Poll, etc., polls can also be free and easy to set up. The first time you create a poll may take a few minutes while you're learning the process, but after that it shouldn't take much time to create and incorporate a poll on your blog.

 

3. Lists - Create a quick list of things on your mind. A famous example of this type of blog post was done by science fiction author John Scalzi. He posted a list of things he had to do that day. Most of the items on the list were actual, mundane things you would see on any "to-do" list, but one was included as a joke: "Tape Bacon to My Cat." He even snapped a picture of his cat with bacon on it and included it in the post. That one post became one of the biggest draws to Scalzi's blog - it just resonated with people for whatever reason. He even got coverage in some mainstream media outlets because of it. Scalzi now gets over 40,000 visitors a day on his blog, and he credits that one simple post as the catalyst for its initial growth.

 

Having an active blog doesn't necessarily mean it has to be a huge time killer. If you pressure yourself to include blogging time in your day, you're likely to burn out quickly. Relax. You can rely on simple content that doesn't take a long time to create as long as the basic content is true to your personal brand.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Authors' Four Structural Essentials for Blogs

Blogging Requires Consistency

2,835 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, blogging, blogging, blogging, blogging, blogging, blogging, blogging, musicians, musicians, musicians, musicians, musicians, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, filmmakers, filmmakers, filmmakers, filmmakers, filmmakers, branding, branding, branding, branding, branding, branding, branding
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     In Defense of Telling - Laura Pauling

Author Laura Pauling argues that "Show it, don't tell it" is a bit misleading. Sometimes you need to tell.


     How to Get Started Doing Your Own PR - BNET

The advice is meant for small business owners but authors and artist of every discipline should pay close attention to this post.



Film


     Going Bionic: Distributing Independent Films Internationally - Film Threat

There are more regional film festivals than you can shake a stick at. So which ones should you put on your short list? Film Threat shares its advice on the matter.


     5 Tips To Remember While Making A Film - sedentarismointelectual.com

How to tell a story on film and keep a lot of people employed in the process.



Music


     Twitter Overtakes MySpace as #3 Social-Networking Site - Paste Magazine

Believe it or not there was a time when MySpace was THE social network, especially for musicians. Now it's fallen to fourth place and could fall even further.


     Copyright Protection Only Costs $35 - Artists House Music

Ever wonder what it takes to copyright a song? Vanessa Kaster uncovers the mystery.



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 28, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 21, 2010 Edition

1,628 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, music, film, self-publishing, movies, writers, blogging, writing, musicians, filmmakers
1

I am a big proponent of authors blogging. Participating in Twitter and Facebook is great for connecting with friends and fans who are already familiar with your work, but to be discovered by someone surfing the Web, you need a place of your own. A blog gives you a place where you can constantly build your personal brand and add your voice to the global conversation. Blog consistently enough and you will attract a following that will be your word-of-mouth campaign.


Before you jump into the main event of writing and updating your blog, here are a few structural features you're going to want to include on your blog from day one. If you already have a blog, and you're missing a few of these elements, don't worry - you can always add them at any time.


1. An About Page - Who are you and why should anyone read your blog? Go beyond your author bio here. Give the relevant information, but don't be afraid to get personal. Are you married? Do you have a family? If you're a loving parent, say so. If you love to bowl, include it. You never know what people are going to connect with.


2. A Contact Page - Some bloggers include this on their about page, but I'm a fan of creating a separate page for your contact information. It allows you to showcase your personal brand a little more, and gives people a "contact" URL they can share with their friends in e-mails and on their social networks. I set up a specific e-mail account for the blog, and I also include my Facebook and Twitter links on this page. I'd advise against posting information that's too personal, like your home address and phone number. Keep it to your virtual contact information.


3. Share Buttons - You can search the Web for "share" buttons and find dozens of free utilities for your blog that will allow you to put icons at the bottom of each blog post. These icons allow readers to click them and automatically post your blog entry as an update on their social networking sites. Voila! They "share" your blog post with their friends and followers with a click of a button.


4. A List of Your Favorite Links - Again, this gives people a little insight into your personal brand, and it also can help create a relationship with another blogger. If they see that your site is consistently funneling traffic to their site, they might return the favor and include your link on their site.


The important thing is to not over-think the blogging process. You don't need a professional designer or blogging expert to get you started. You just need a desire to create your personal brand and access to the internet. Include these four elements in your blog, and you'll be starting off on the right foot to build a following in no time.


What other elements do you think are key to a blog's layout? Tell us in the comments!


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Blogging Requires Consistency

Blogging - "Why would anyone care what I have to say?"

8,068 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self-publishing, promotion, blogging, friends, fans, branding
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     The Hunger Games: A Fantastic Series And Lessons For Writers - The Creative Penn

It's quite possibly the most underrated series in young adult fiction today. Joanna Penn looks between the covers to see what makes The Hunger Games books so great.


     Should I do my own marketing? - MacGregor Literary

A first-time author asks agent Chip MacGregor if he should market his own book. My answer? You better believe it.



Film


     The Lost Art of the Comedy Short - Forces of Geek

The Three Stooges wowed and continue to wow the adolescent minded among us with their version of the comedy short. The question is why doesn't the comedy short work into today's world of the short attention span?


     The Independent Movie Budget That Works - Screenwriting Basics

When it comes to making a low-budget film, the best strategy is to base your budget on resources you have, not resources you want.



Music


     The Future of Rock and Roll - Inside Music Media

It's only commercialism in rock and roll, and I like it...or do I? Can merchandising save rock and roll?


     Are Artists More Pressured to Conform? - Hypebot.com

Are today's musicians setting trends or trying to follow them? Is success just a matter of conforming, or is the way of the rebel still they way of the rock and roll warrior?



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 21, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 14, 2010 Edition

2,114 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self_publishing, books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, book, book, music, music, film, film, self-publishing, self-publishing, movies, movies, blogging, blogging, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     Killer Openings - Pub Rants

Most people don't keep reading a book with a weak opening to get to the good part. Agent Kristin explains what beginnings kill a book.


     Why self-imposed deadlines are the key to writing a book - Author Thought Leadership

Just because you're a self-published author doesn't mean you should throw away deadlines. Knowing when you need to end can be as useful as knowing where to end.



Film


     Filmmaker fluff puts pressure on 3D - Variety

So far 3D films have been vehicles for genre cinema. Is it too gimmicky for serious subjects?


     Guerrilla Filmmaking - No Such Thing As No Budget - Slice of Americana Films

Have you ever noticed that no-budget films usually cost money to make? Apparently no-budget doesn't always mean no-budget.



Music


     The Emotional Language of Chords - Music After 50

Ever wonder what harmonic function is? Wonder no more.


     3 Ways to Become a Music Marketing Ninja - Bob Baker's Buzz Factor

Want to become deadly effective marketing your music? Bob Baker can help you out.



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 14, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 7, 2010 Edition

2,277 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, blogging, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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I was running today, and I came to a hill...or bump...or slight incline (whatever you want to call it). It took a lot of effort to get my somewhat gelatinous frame over the hill, but it felt like I had accomplished something. I went on with my run, and while running home, I came back to the same spot. I sighed in relief as I realized I would be descending the hill because I was under the assumption that going downhill was easier. I took a few steps down the hill and discovered something. It seemed to take as much effort navigating the downgrade as it did navigating the incline. It was enough of a surprise to make me reevaluate all clichés.


Why do I bring this up? Because it made me think about writing and selling books, of course. When I was a first-time self-published author, I thought I had finished the hard part of the process when I completed the manuscript. I had gone uphill writing the book. I'd built and destroyed and rebuilt my story in order to get it to the point where it was coherent and, I felt, compelling. After all the work to perfect my book and get it on the market, I thought the hard part was over and I'd be able to just cruise downhill.


But what I found, just as I did when I was running, was that going downhill takes effort. You expend the same amount of energy as you do going uphill. Selling the book is as hard - in some cases, harder - than writing the book. I've talked to too many authors over the years who have elected to remain at the top of the hill because the effort to descend it was much more difficult than they anticipated.


For me, the hard part of selling books is learning entirely new skill sets. When I started, I didn't know anything about Web sites, social media, blogs, personal videos, etc. until I got serious about selling books. I studied the state of selling books, and it was clear the only way I was going to get down the hill was to put in the effort and teach myself the world of Web 2.0. What I found was that learning the virtual world isn't that hard. It's just a different form of what I already do: creating. Granted, finding enough time in the day sometimes has been really difficult, but devoting time to building my online presence is crucial enough that I have made some sacrifices and reprioritized my schedule. In other words, I'm devoting as much time and energy going down the hill as I am going up it these days, and I probably will for as long as I have books on the market.


What obstacles do you find most challenging when selling books, and how do you overcome them?


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Selling the Self-Published Author with Kinetic Marketing

Outside-The-Box Ideas

2,969 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, running, promotions
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You Can't Love All the Parts of Your Story Equally

Author Orson Scott Card has a string of bestselling books to his credit, and he's a fan favorite among lovers of science fiction. He's known as a master storyteller with a flair for building strong and enduring characters. Recently, Card wrote an article about story structure for Writer's Digest magazine. What his philosophy?


All stories contain four elements that can determine structure: milieu, idea, character and event. While each is present in every story, there is generally one that dominates the others. Which one dominates? The one that the author cares about most. This is why the process of discovering the structure of a story is usually a process of self-discovery. Which aspect of the story matters most to you? That is the aspect that determines your story's structure.


You can read the entire article here: The 4 Story Structures that Dominate Novels



"I Really Want to Direct."

It's a refrain heard over and over again in acting circles. Many actors want to direct. The question is, why? Why do they want to give up the glamour of being in front of the camera for the responsibility and grind of being behind the camera and the script and the crew, etc.? What drives actors to become directors? The Boston Globe recently asked that very question.


Tony Goldwyn, who directed the upcoming film "Conviction" (about a Massachusetts woman, Betty Anne Waters, who helped free her wrongly convicted brother), says he started directing because he wanted to have more influence over his career and the projects he was interested in developing, a common refrain among actors-turned-director. As a rising young actor, he had watched his career heat up fast in the early '90s with films like "Ghost," but then struggled to land good material.


You can read the entire article here: Acting on an urge to be the director



Are You Ready to Rock?

Explore the career paths of some legendary musicians in Davis Guggenheim's new film, "It Might Get Loud." The film features Jimmy Page, the Edge and Jack White chatting it up about their lives as guitarists in rock-and-roll bands. What makes them tick? Is there a common thread that propels them? According to the Edge there is.


I guess what the three of us all have in common, for different reasons, is a restlessness. We're all trying to get at this unattainable sound in our heads. You need tension, something at odds with itself, to make good music. Whenever it's easy or straightforward, it's boring. It's why playing in a band is such a great thing, because everyone is after something different, which often takes you somewhere unexpected, which is usually the most interesting place of all.


You can read the entire article on The Los Angeles Times' website: Wanna be a rock star? Career advice from Jimmy Page, the Edge and Jack White



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 10, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 3, 2010

1,665 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     The Difference between Mysteries, Suspense and Thrillers - Nathan Bransford

There are so many genres out there, so how can you tell one from the other? Nathan Bransford does his part to uncover the mystery.


     Can Writers Market Themselves Without Making Eyes Roll? - Jody Hedlund

There is a fine line between marketing yourself and bragging endlessly about yourself. The business of self-promotion requires a healthy dose of humility.

 

 

Film


     DIY Filmmaking: The Business Plan - Insane Ramblings of a Sane Madman

Filmmaker Devin Watson reminds us that filmmaking is a business - one that requires planning and professionalism to woo investors.


     The case against 3-D filmmaking - Move

Is 3-D a crutch to prop up poor storytelling? Why does Roger Ebert refer to the process as "suicidal" for the film industry?

 


Music


     17 Performance Tips I Learned the Hard Way - Judy Rodman

Did you know your voice needs your feet? Or, that a high protein meal can help your vocal performance?


     Elektra Records Founder on YouTube, Blogs and the Future of Music - Mashable

Mark Zuckerberg ruminates about the future of the music business and the importance of keeping experienced people in the mix to help the industry flourish.


 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 7, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 31, 2010 Edition

1,495 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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If Only Jonathan Franzen Had Gotten Some Advance Publicity for His New Novel!

It must be tough being Jonathan Franzen these days. His new novel Freedom became a literary topic of debate weeks before it even hit the bookstores. Time magazine and Newsweek both did stories on it. The Huffington Post has chimed in and The New York Times did two reviews of the book in seven days. What's the big hubbub? Could it be the anti-Oprah effect?


It's a noisy near-debut for a book that will come nearly nine years after Mr. Franzen's previous novel, "The Corrections," a blockbuster success that sold almost three million copies worldwide. "Freedom," like "The Corrections," is a microscopically close inspection of a loving but flawed Midwestern family. It was with the earlier book that Mr. Franzen first drew wrath from some in literary circles when he suggested that having the seal of the Oprah Winfrey book club on the cover of his novel might keep readers - especially men - away.


You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: A Novel Is All the Rage Even Before It Is Sold



A Classic Breakdown

Why are some movies destined to be classics? What elements turn a story told with actors, lights, cameras and crisp, clean dialogue into a timeless masterpiece? It's rare when everything comes together and delivers a film that audiences come back to over and over again. The Guardian picked a few films considered to be classics and defined what makes them great.


As screenwriter William Goldman famously said of film-making, "nobody knows anything." The art of cinema is, by definition, a cocktail of disciplines: writing, acting, shooting, scoring. But on top of that, there is that indefinable, intangible something that makes a movie special. It's not about budget, or James Cameron's Avatar would be everyone's favourite. It's about much more than that: a classic movie is quite simply a phenomenon, a lightning bolt trapped in a bottle, a colossus to be aped but never equaled, no matter how hard its rivals try. So how can we define a classic?


Find out how The Guardian defines a classic on its website: What makes a movie classic?



The Indie Spirit Rolls On

There are fewer slots for bands and artists at major labels these days. How are hopeful indie musicians adapting to the dwindling opportunities? They are embracing their indie status. With distribution less of a barrier these days, musicians are turning up their entrepreneurial spirit and taking their music directly to the people.


Flea, the bass player with the Red Hot Chili Peppers, one of the most successful L.A. bands ever, said the old daydreams of rock are outdated: "When I was young, it was about the magical record-label guy who tapped you on the shoulder and suddenly you're playing the Forum, riding around in a limo, getting that shiny tour bus. All of that doesn't exist anymore."


You can read the entire article on The Los Angeles Times' website: The path to success is no longer labeled



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 3, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - August 27, 2010

1,850 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, musicians, filmmakers
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You've probably heard me and other authors talking about the importance of social networking, personal videos, and blogging in order to build your personal brand. But what does living the Web 2.0 life really entail? It can be demanding trying to manage all three elements, and I don't want to suggest that you should abandon your off-line, real-world efforts to market your book. But I do think it's important for you to master the virtual world in order to sell books. The most effective use of your time online is to create a synergistic plan that incorporates all of your virtual real estate.


I can best illustrate this by using myself as an example. I belong to a group of like-minded individuals on Facebook. It has close to 7,000 members, and I contribute to the discussions quite a bit. I recently did a video that I thought the group would find interesting, so I wrote a blog post about the video and embedded it on my blog. I then logged in to Facebook and put a link to my blog post on the Facebook group's wall. What happened? I got a lot of traffic from the Facebook group that day. But not only from members of the group. Some of the members shared the link to my blog with some of their Facebook friends outside the group. This image is a screenshot of my blog statistics shortly after posting the link. It shows the Web sites referring traffic to my site.

Synergy_Referrer.jpg

As you can see, most of the traffic at the time was coming from Facebook. Now, the benefit for me is that they were all introduced to my books once they visited my blog because I have them prominently displayed. My job now is to get them to come back over and over again, which isn't too difficult because at least I know where to find them.


Web 2.0 is a great tool if you're actively involved in all three fronts, and you're relying on synergy to build your personal brand. What are some of your own tips for success in the Web 2.0 world?


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Future of E-mail & Marketing

Blogging Requires Consistency

781 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, self-publishing, writers, blogging, writing, facebook
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     5 Steps to Dazzling Minor Characters - Wordplay

Are they just background to fill in pages, or do secondary characters add to the story? If they don't, they are a waste of the reader's time.


     How to Write the Ending of Your Novel - The Creative Penn

The end - They might be the most difficult words to write in a novel. How do you find a resolution to a story that's covered tens of thousands of words?


Film


     Net Gain - Indian Express

Filmmakers in India are finding success with crowd-sourcing. Social networking has become a useful fundraising tool for independent filmmakers.


     GLOBAL JOURNALIST: The future of documentary filmmaking - The Missourian

Documentaries can do more than tell a story. They can change the world.


Music


    Using 'Vocal Licks' Correctly - Music After 50

Vocal embellishments can make a singer look really good or really bad. Judy Rodman tells you how to hit the right note when you want to break out the vocal licks.


     Band Rehearsal Lessons from Prince - Bob Baker

Sometimes even a jam session needs to be rehearsed in order to sound spontaneous.   



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 31, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 24, 2010 Edition

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Seth Godin Takes Total Control of His Brand

The man who puts the "gu" in marketing guru has decided to take his brand and go home. In essence, Seth Godin, bestselling author of close to a dozen books on marketing and social trends, has decided to cut out the middleman and self-publish his books. He's spent a number of years building his online platform and has developed a direct (albeit virtual) relationship with his readers. Godin's primary message in marketing is to react quickly to trends and technology, a philosophy that prompted this bold move.


Mr. Godin, a public speaker and proponent of nimbleness and the need for speed in marketing goods, has long delighted in shaking up traditional thinking. One of his many concerns about the current publishing market is that the process often takes 12 months or more to get a new title into the hands of his readers. Mr. Godin's most recent book, "Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?" has sold 50,000 copies to date since its release in January, according to Nielsen BookScan, which tracks about 75% of the retail book marketplace. Adrian Zackheim, publisher of Portfolio, said that "Linchpin" is Mr. Godin's fastest-selling book but declined to comment further.


You can read the entire article on The Wall Street Journal's website: Author to Bypass Publisher for Fans



The Good Old Days of 3-D Filmmaking

Once upon a time, the debate raged over the quality of analog filmmaking compared to digital filmmaking. Digital was long thought to be the inferior format, but digital technology caught up and the naysayers slowly started to appreciate the new medium. Now the debate has shifted to the 3-D world. There are some who believe the analog 3-D technology used in the 1950s is far superior to the digital 3-D methods used today.


An irresistible topic of discussion among film industry pundits these days is whether the current multiplex 3-D wave has crested since the release of "Avatar" in late 2009. Starting Friday, Film Forum will state a persuasive case for the notion that 3-D movies peaked in quality 50 years before this debate even began, with a two-week, 15-film survey of Hollywood's first detour into depth-manipulating filmmaking from 1953 to 1954.


You can read the entire article on The Wall Street Journal's website: Looking Back on Life in the Third Dimension



CSI Mozart

Trying to determine what caused the death of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart has almost become a cottage industry. There's an odd curiosity focused on the circumstances of his passing that started shortly after his death and still lingers today. Scholars, physicians and music lovers alike have dedicated a good deal of time and research to uncovering the mystery. Was the genius composer murdered or did he die of a mysterious ailment? Here's an excerpt from a New York Times article on the subject.


Scholars have also examined accounts of Mozart's ailments in letters written by family members, especially his father, Leopold, to uncover signposts regarding his final sickness. Speculation about an abnormality in the shape of his ear has even led some to suggest that kidney failure was likely, since urinary tract deformities are sometimes related to ear abnormalities. The indirect evidence itself rests on a quicksand of changing medical definitions, sometimes mistranslated phrases from original testimonies and leaps forward in the understanding of diseases and how the body works.


You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: After Mozart's Death, an Endless Coda



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - August 27, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - August 20, 2010

1,762 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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