Skip navigation
1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 Previous Next

Resources

131 Posts tagged with the blogging tag
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     In Defense of Telling - Laura Pauling

Author Laura Pauling argues that "Show it, don't tell it" is a bit misleading. Sometimes you need to tell.


     How to Get Started Doing Your Own PR - BNET

The advice is meant for small business owners but authors and artist of every discipline should pay close attention to this post.



Film


     Going Bionic: Distributing Independent Films Internationally - Film Threat

There are more regional film festivals than you can shake a stick at. So which ones should you put on your short list? Film Threat shares its advice on the matter.


     5 Tips To Remember While Making A Film - sedentarismointelectual.com

How to tell a story on film and keep a lot of people employed in the process.



Music


     Twitter Overtakes MySpace as #3 Social-Networking Site - Paste Magazine

Believe it or not there was a time when MySpace was THE social network, especially for musicians. Now it's fallen to fourth place and could fall even further.


     Copyright Protection Only Costs $35 - Artists House Music

Ever wonder what it takes to copyright a song? Vanessa Kaster uncovers the mystery.



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 28, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 21, 2010 Edition

1,536 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, music, film, self-publishing, movies, writers, blogging, writing, musicians, filmmakers
1

I am a big proponent of authors blogging. Participating in Twitter and Facebook is great for connecting with friends and fans who are already familiar with your work, but to be discovered by someone surfing the Web, you need a place of your own. A blog gives you a place where you can constantly build your personal brand and add your voice to the global conversation. Blog consistently enough and you will attract a following that will be your word-of-mouth campaign.


Before you jump into the main event of writing and updating your blog, here are a few structural features you're going to want to include on your blog from day one. If you already have a blog, and you're missing a few of these elements, don't worry - you can always add them at any time.


1. An About Page - Who are you and why should anyone read your blog? Go beyond your author bio here. Give the relevant information, but don't be afraid to get personal. Are you married? Do you have a family? If you're a loving parent, say so. If you love to bowl, include it. You never know what people are going to connect with.


2. A Contact Page - Some bloggers include this on their about page, but I'm a fan of creating a separate page for your contact information. It allows you to showcase your personal brand a little more, and gives people a "contact" URL they can share with their friends in e-mails and on their social networks. I set up a specific e-mail account for the blog, and I also include my Facebook and Twitter links on this page. I'd advise against posting information that's too personal, like your home address and phone number. Keep it to your virtual contact information.


3. Share Buttons - You can search the Web for "share" buttons and find dozens of free utilities for your blog that will allow you to put icons at the bottom of each blog post. These icons allow readers to click them and automatically post your blog entry as an update on their social networking sites. Voila! They "share" your blog post with their friends and followers with a click of a button.


4. A List of Your Favorite Links - Again, this gives people a little insight into your personal brand, and it also can help create a relationship with another blogger. If they see that your site is consistently funneling traffic to their site, they might return the favor and include your link on their site.


The important thing is to not over-think the blogging process. You don't need a professional designer or blogging expert to get you started. You just need a desire to create your personal brand and access to the internet. Include these four elements in your blog, and you'll be starting off on the right foot to build a following in no time.


What other elements do you think are key to a blog's layout? Tell us in the comments!


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Blogging Requires Consistency

Blogging - "Why would anyone care what I have to say?"

7,667 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self-publishing, promotion, blogging, friends, fans, branding
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     The Hunger Games: A Fantastic Series And Lessons For Writers - The Creative Penn

It's quite possibly the most underrated series in young adult fiction today. Joanna Penn looks between the covers to see what makes The Hunger Games books so great.


     Should I do my own marketing? - MacGregor Literary

A first-time author asks agent Chip MacGregor if he should market his own book. My answer? You better believe it.



Film


     The Lost Art of the Comedy Short - Forces of Geek

The Three Stooges wowed and continue to wow the adolescent minded among us with their version of the comedy short. The question is why doesn't the comedy short work into today's world of the short attention span?


     The Independent Movie Budget That Works - Screenwriting Basics

When it comes to making a low-budget film, the best strategy is to base your budget on resources you have, not resources you want.



Music


     The Future of Rock and Roll - Inside Music Media

It's only commercialism in rock and roll, and I like it...or do I? Can merchandising save rock and roll?


     Are Artists More Pressured to Conform? - Hypebot.com

Are today's musicians setting trends or trying to follow them? Is success just a matter of conforming, or is the way of the rebel still they way of the rock and roll warrior?



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 21, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 14, 2010 Edition

1,921 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self_publishing, books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, book, book, music, music, film, film, self-publishing, self-publishing, movies, movies, blogging, blogging, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     Killer Openings - Pub Rants

Most people don't keep reading a book with a weak opening to get to the good part. Agent Kristin explains what beginnings kill a book.


     Why self-imposed deadlines are the key to writing a book - Author Thought Leadership

Just because you're a self-published author doesn't mean you should throw away deadlines. Knowing when you need to end can be as useful as knowing where to end.



Film


     Filmmaker fluff puts pressure on 3D - Variety

So far 3D films have been vehicles for genre cinema. Is it too gimmicky for serious subjects?


     Guerrilla Filmmaking - No Such Thing As No Budget - Slice of Americana Films

Have you ever noticed that no-budget films usually cost money to make? Apparently no-budget doesn't always mean no-budget.



Music


     The Emotional Language of Chords - Music After 50

Ever wonder what harmonic function is? Wonder no more.


     3 Ways to Become a Music Marketing Ninja - Bob Baker's Buzz Factor

Want to become deadly effective marketing your music? Bob Baker can help you out.



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 14, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 7, 2010 Edition

2,145 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, blogging, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
0

I was running today, and I came to a hill...or bump...or slight incline (whatever you want to call it). It took a lot of effort to get my somewhat gelatinous frame over the hill, but it felt like I had accomplished something. I went on with my run, and while running home, I came back to the same spot. I sighed in relief as I realized I would be descending the hill because I was under the assumption that going downhill was easier. I took a few steps down the hill and discovered something. It seemed to take as much effort navigating the downgrade as it did navigating the incline. It was enough of a surprise to make me reevaluate all clichés.


Why do I bring this up? Because it made me think about writing and selling books, of course. When I was a first-time self-published author, I thought I had finished the hard part of the process when I completed the manuscript. I had gone uphill writing the book. I'd built and destroyed and rebuilt my story in order to get it to the point where it was coherent and, I felt, compelling. After all the work to perfect my book and get it on the market, I thought the hard part was over and I'd be able to just cruise downhill.


But what I found, just as I did when I was running, was that going downhill takes effort. You expend the same amount of energy as you do going uphill. Selling the book is as hard - in some cases, harder - than writing the book. I've talked to too many authors over the years who have elected to remain at the top of the hill because the effort to descend it was much more difficult than they anticipated.


For me, the hard part of selling books is learning entirely new skill sets. When I started, I didn't know anything about Web sites, social media, blogs, personal videos, etc. until I got serious about selling books. I studied the state of selling books, and it was clear the only way I was going to get down the hill was to put in the effort and teach myself the world of Web 2.0. What I found was that learning the virtual world isn't that hard. It's just a different form of what I already do: creating. Granted, finding enough time in the day sometimes has been really difficult, but devoting time to building my online presence is crucial enough that I have made some sacrifices and reprioritized my schedule. In other words, I'm devoting as much time and energy going down the hill as I am going up it these days, and I probably will for as long as I have books on the market.


What obstacles do you find most challenging when selling books, and how do you overcome them?


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Selling the Self-Published Author with Kinetic Marketing

Outside-The-Box Ideas

2,737 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, running, promotions
0

You Can't Love All the Parts of Your Story Equally

Author Orson Scott Card has a string of bestselling books to his credit, and he's a fan favorite among lovers of science fiction. He's known as a master storyteller with a flair for building strong and enduring characters. Recently, Card wrote an article about story structure for Writer's Digest magazine. What his philosophy?


All stories contain four elements that can determine structure: milieu, idea, character and event. While each is present in every story, there is generally one that dominates the others. Which one dominates? The one that the author cares about most. This is why the process of discovering the structure of a story is usually a process of self-discovery. Which aspect of the story matters most to you? That is the aspect that determines your story's structure.


You can read the entire article here: The 4 Story Structures that Dominate Novels



"I Really Want to Direct."

It's a refrain heard over and over again in acting circles. Many actors want to direct. The question is, why? Why do they want to give up the glamour of being in front of the camera for the responsibility and grind of being behind the camera and the script and the crew, etc.? What drives actors to become directors? The Boston Globe recently asked that very question.


Tony Goldwyn, who directed the upcoming film "Conviction" (about a Massachusetts woman, Betty Anne Waters, who helped free her wrongly convicted brother), says he started directing because he wanted to have more influence over his career and the projects he was interested in developing, a common refrain among actors-turned-director. As a rising young actor, he had watched his career heat up fast in the early '90s with films like "Ghost," but then struggled to land good material.


You can read the entire article here: Acting on an urge to be the director



Are You Ready to Rock?

Explore the career paths of some legendary musicians in Davis Guggenheim's new film, "It Might Get Loud." The film features Jimmy Page, the Edge and Jack White chatting it up about their lives as guitarists in rock-and-roll bands. What makes them tick? Is there a common thread that propels them? According to the Edge there is.


I guess what the three of us all have in common, for different reasons, is a restlessness. We're all trying to get at this unattainable sound in our heads. You need tension, something at odds with itself, to make good music. Whenever it's easy or straightforward, it's boring. It's why playing in a band is such a great thing, because everyone is after something different, which often takes you somewhere unexpected, which is usually the most interesting place of all.


You can read the entire article on The Los Angeles Times' website: Wanna be a rock star? Career advice from Jimmy Page, the Edge and Jack White



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 10, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 3, 2010

1,547 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     The Difference between Mysteries, Suspense and Thrillers - Nathan Bransford

There are so many genres out there, so how can you tell one from the other? Nathan Bransford does his part to uncover the mystery.


     Can Writers Market Themselves Without Making Eyes Roll? - Jody Hedlund

There is a fine line between marketing yourself and bragging endlessly about yourself. The business of self-promotion requires a healthy dose of humility.

 

 

Film


     DIY Filmmaking: The Business Plan - Insane Ramblings of a Sane Madman

Filmmaker Devin Watson reminds us that filmmaking is a business - one that requires planning and professionalism to woo investors.


     The case against 3-D filmmaking - Move

Is 3-D a crutch to prop up poor storytelling? Why does Roger Ebert refer to the process as "suicidal" for the film industry?

 


Music


     17 Performance Tips I Learned the Hard Way - Judy Rodman

Did you know your voice needs your feet? Or, that a high protein meal can help your vocal performance?


     Elektra Records Founder on YouTube, Blogs and the Future of Music - Mashable

Mark Zuckerberg ruminates about the future of the music business and the importance of keeping experienced people in the mix to help the industry flourish.


 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 7, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 31, 2010 Edition

1,426 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
0

If Only Jonathan Franzen Had Gotten Some Advance Publicity for His New Novel!

It must be tough being Jonathan Franzen these days. His new novel Freedom became a literary topic of debate weeks before it even hit the bookstores. Time magazine and Newsweek both did stories on it. The Huffington Post has chimed in and The New York Times did two reviews of the book in seven days. What's the big hubbub? Could it be the anti-Oprah effect?


It's a noisy near-debut for a book that will come nearly nine years after Mr. Franzen's previous novel, "The Corrections," a blockbuster success that sold almost three million copies worldwide. "Freedom," like "The Corrections," is a microscopically close inspection of a loving but flawed Midwestern family. It was with the earlier book that Mr. Franzen first drew wrath from some in literary circles when he suggested that having the seal of the Oprah Winfrey book club on the cover of his novel might keep readers - especially men - away.


You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: A Novel Is All the Rage Even Before It Is Sold



A Classic Breakdown

Why are some movies destined to be classics? What elements turn a story told with actors, lights, cameras and crisp, clean dialogue into a timeless masterpiece? It's rare when everything comes together and delivers a film that audiences come back to over and over again. The Guardian picked a few films considered to be classics and defined what makes them great.


As screenwriter William Goldman famously said of film-making, "nobody knows anything." The art of cinema is, by definition, a cocktail of disciplines: writing, acting, shooting, scoring. But on top of that, there is that indefinable, intangible something that makes a movie special. It's not about budget, or James Cameron's Avatar would be everyone's favourite. It's about much more than that: a classic movie is quite simply a phenomenon, a lightning bolt trapped in a bottle, a colossus to be aped but never equaled, no matter how hard its rivals try. So how can we define a classic?


Find out how The Guardian defines a classic on its website: What makes a movie classic?



The Indie Spirit Rolls On

There are fewer slots for bands and artists at major labels these days. How are hopeful indie musicians adapting to the dwindling opportunities? They are embracing their indie status. With distribution less of a barrier these days, musicians are turning up their entrepreneurial spirit and taking their music directly to the people.


Flea, the bass player with the Red Hot Chili Peppers, one of the most successful L.A. bands ever, said the old daydreams of rock are outdated: "When I was young, it was about the magical record-label guy who tapped you on the shoulder and suddenly you're playing the Forum, riding around in a limo, getting that shiny tour bus. All of that doesn't exist anymore."


You can read the entire article on The Los Angeles Times' website: The path to success is no longer labeled



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 3, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - August 27, 2010

1,727 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, musicians, filmmakers
0

You've probably heard me and other authors talking about the importance of social networking, personal videos, and blogging in order to build your personal brand. But what does living the Web 2.0 life really entail? It can be demanding trying to manage all three elements, and I don't want to suggest that you should abandon your off-line, real-world efforts to market your book. But I do think it's important for you to master the virtual world in order to sell books. The most effective use of your time online is to create a synergistic plan that incorporates all of your virtual real estate.


I can best illustrate this by using myself as an example. I belong to a group of like-minded individuals on Facebook. It has close to 7,000 members, and I contribute to the discussions quite a bit. I recently did a video that I thought the group would find interesting, so I wrote a blog post about the video and embedded it on my blog. I then logged in to Facebook and put a link to my blog post on the Facebook group's wall. What happened? I got a lot of traffic from the Facebook group that day. But not only from members of the group. Some of the members shared the link to my blog with some of their Facebook friends outside the group. This image is a screenshot of my blog statistics shortly after posting the link. It shows the Web sites referring traffic to my site.

Synergy_Referrer.jpg

As you can see, most of the traffic at the time was coming from Facebook. Now, the benefit for me is that they were all introduced to my books once they visited my blog because I have them prominently displayed. My job now is to get them to come back over and over again, which isn't too difficult because at least I know where to find them.


Web 2.0 is a great tool if you're actively involved in all three fronts, and you're relying on synergy to build your personal brand. What are some of your own tips for success in the Web 2.0 world?


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


The Future of E-mail & Marketing

Blogging Requires Consistency

702 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, self-publishing, writers, blogging, writing, facebook
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     5 Steps to Dazzling Minor Characters - Wordplay

Are they just background to fill in pages, or do secondary characters add to the story? If they don't, they are a waste of the reader's time.


     How to Write the Ending of Your Novel - The Creative Penn

The end - They might be the most difficult words to write in a novel. How do you find a resolution to a story that's covered tens of thousands of words?


Film


     Net Gain - Indian Express

Filmmakers in India are finding success with crowd-sourcing. Social networking has become a useful fundraising tool for independent filmmakers.


     GLOBAL JOURNALIST: The future of documentary filmmaking - The Missourian

Documentaries can do more than tell a story. They can change the world.


Music


    Using 'Vocal Licks' Correctly - Music After 50

Vocal embellishments can make a singer look really good or really bad. Judy Rodman tells you how to hit the right note when you want to break out the vocal licks.


     Band Rehearsal Lessons from Prince - Bob Baker

Sometimes even a jam session needs to be rehearsed in order to sound spontaneous.   



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 31, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 24, 2010 Edition

509 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, musicians, filmmakers
0

Seth Godin Takes Total Control of His Brand

The man who puts the "gu" in marketing guru has decided to take his brand and go home. In essence, Seth Godin, bestselling author of close to a dozen books on marketing and social trends, has decided to cut out the middleman and self-publish his books. He's spent a number of years building his online platform and has developed a direct (albeit virtual) relationship with his readers. Godin's primary message in marketing is to react quickly to trends and technology, a philosophy that prompted this bold move.


Mr. Godin, a public speaker and proponent of nimbleness and the need for speed in marketing goods, has long delighted in shaking up traditional thinking. One of his many concerns about the current publishing market is that the process often takes 12 months or more to get a new title into the hands of his readers. Mr. Godin's most recent book, "Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?" has sold 50,000 copies to date since its release in January, according to Nielsen BookScan, which tracks about 75% of the retail book marketplace. Adrian Zackheim, publisher of Portfolio, said that "Linchpin" is Mr. Godin's fastest-selling book but declined to comment further.


You can read the entire article on The Wall Street Journal's website: Author to Bypass Publisher for Fans



The Good Old Days of 3-D Filmmaking

Once upon a time, the debate raged over the quality of analog filmmaking compared to digital filmmaking. Digital was long thought to be the inferior format, but digital technology caught up and the naysayers slowly started to appreciate the new medium. Now the debate has shifted to the 3-D world. There are some who believe the analog 3-D technology used in the 1950s is far superior to the digital 3-D methods used today.


An irresistible topic of discussion among film industry pundits these days is whether the current multiplex 3-D wave has crested since the release of "Avatar" in late 2009. Starting Friday, Film Forum will state a persuasive case for the notion that 3-D movies peaked in quality 50 years before this debate even began, with a two-week, 15-film survey of Hollywood's first detour into depth-manipulating filmmaking from 1953 to 1954.


You can read the entire article on The Wall Street Journal's website: Looking Back on Life in the Third Dimension



CSI Mozart

Trying to determine what caused the death of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart has almost become a cottage industry. There's an odd curiosity focused on the circumstances of his passing that started shortly after his death and still lingers today. Scholars, physicians and music lovers alike have dedicated a good deal of time and research to uncovering the mystery. Was the genius composer murdered or did he die of a mysterious ailment? Here's an excerpt from a New York Times article on the subject.


Scholars have also examined accounts of Mozart's ailments in letters written by family members, especially his father, Leopold, to uncover signposts regarding his final sickness. Speculation about an abnormality in the shape of his ear has even led some to suggest that kidney failure was likely, since urinary tract deformities are sometimes related to ear abnormalities. The indirect evidence itself rests on a quicksand of changing medical definitions, sometimes mistranslated phrases from original testimonies and leaps forward in the understanding of diseases and how the body works.


You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: After Mozart's Death, an Endless Coda



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - August 27, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - August 20, 2010

1,677 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing


     Questions to Ask Yourself Before You Start a Revision - Elana Johnson

An editor from Viking gives you her best advice on how to approach the toughest part of writing, the revision.   


     Act First, Explain Later - The Blood-Red Pencil

Jodie Renner shares her twelve dos and don'ts for making the first page of your novel more compelling.

 


Film


     DSLR Film Making - Rebel Digital SLR

Could a camera designed for still photography be the future of cinema? They?re small, cheap and they pack as much image information as 35mm cameras.

 

     The Million Hit Man: An Interview with Sean Dunne - Film Threat

A young filmmaker uploads his short documentary to Vimeo and practically becomes an overnight sensation.   

 

 

Music

 

     How Popular Musicians Learn - How to Practice

Are you a formal learner or informal learner? Can you learn to play by ear? Mike Saville reviews a book by Lucy Green that examines the benefits of the different practicing styles. 


     A Great Relationship: You and Guitar - Music After 50

Chuck Anderson looks at the most popular instrument in the world and tries to uncover why everyone wants to play guitar.

 

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 17, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 10, 2010 Edition

1,427 Views 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self_publishing, books, books, authors, authors, book, book, music, music, film, film, self-publishing, self-publishing, promotion, promotion, sales, sales, writers, writers, blogging, blogging, publishing, publishing, writing, writing, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
0

A Book's Price

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Aug 23, 2010

I'm often asked by self-published authors just getting started what they should charge for their books. It's a tough question to answer because there are certain variables to take into account. Beyond trim size and page count, you have to know your market and demographic. Generally, a book with a narrow market will have a higher price than a book geared toward a broad market. Why? Because narrow-market titles usually have less competition. For example, not as many people write about proper diamond cutting techniques as they do about how to start and manage a small business. As a result, the two books may have significantly different prices, even if the binding, trim size, and page count are identical.

 

Now, I write for a broad market so my goal is to make my pricing as competitive as possible. When I was researching on what to charge for my books, the first thing I did was look at what other books in my genre were selling for by visiting various online retailers and local booksellers. Usually there was very little discrepancy in book pricing among titles in the same genre. Next, I consulted two other pricing resources.

 

  1. BookStatistics.com - This is a site created by Dan Poytner, a highly regarded authority on self-publishing. Dan has collected various statistics pertaining to publishing over the years, and his Web site is a kind of dumping ground for that data. He doesn't add comment or catalog it in any particular order, so it really is just raw data. It was on this site where I found a study done by the Book Industry Study Guide in 2001 that revealed some interesting answers to the question: How much do people like to pay? The interesting part was when you took mass market paperbacks out of the mix, there was no clear preference on pricing.
  2.  

  3. The School Library Journal - The SLJ does an annual report on average book pricing to help librarians create acquisitions budgets every year. It's a great tool because it gives you pricing according to binding type, category, and intended market. The report gives you an excellent sense of pricing within the entire publishing industry.

 

No one can tell you the best price for your book, but if you do a little research, you can come up with a price that should make you competitive without selling yourself short.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...


Creating an Effective Business Plan

The Great Chapter Debate

2,724 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, writing, promotions, craft, branding
0

Writers and Stage Fright

Few authors pursue a career in writing because they long to read their work on a public stage. In fact, many writers turn to writing to limit their need to appear and read their work in public. But in today's publishing world, the need to put a public face on books conflicts with many writers' lack of desire to be so public. What is such an author to do? Ben Myers of The Guardian has a few ideas.


So how does the performance-shy writer compensate? Well, fortunately it's the 21st century and there are many alternatives. Personally I've signed up to social network sites, built up mailing lists, and worked to maintain contacts with journalists and readers. With each inane tweet my dream of being a Salinger-esque enigma diminishes, yet it still feels a necessary evil. I've also schmoozed booksellers and chain stores' buyers, made audio recordings and printed up postcards that I leave in strategic places. It's shameless really.


You can read the entire article on The Guardian's website: The public role of the private writer



Star Power Doesn't Always Make Things Easy

So you usually make bank at the box office. You're the creator and executive producer of a popular HBO series. You have legions of fans all over the world. Getting a movie made should be no problem, right? Not so fast. Mark Wahlberg has a movie called "The Fighter" coming out in December for which he had to fight to get studio backing. Wahlberg spent four years trying to get backing.


Back in 2007 Paramount almost made "The Fighter" based on drafts by a pair of original writers, Eric Johnson and Paul Tamasy, with later script work by Lewis Colick, with Darren Aronofsky directing, and Matt Damon playing the half-brother, Dick Ecklund. But Mr. Damon moved instead to other projects, opening the door to a monthslong flirtation with Brad Pitt, and more writing at various points by Paul Attanasio and Scott Silver. Eventually Mr. Pitt dropped out, as did Mr. Aronofsky, who in the interim had made "The Wrestler"and decided against another trip to the ring. Mr. Bale then agreed to play Mr. Ecklund, a former boxer who helped train his younger half-brother, and whose addiction to crack cocaine was portrayed in the documentary "High on Crack Street: Lost Lives in Lowell." "It was always in danger of collapse," said David Hoberman, who with Todd Lieberman, his partner in Mandeville Films, originally took "The Fighter" to Paramount, and ultimately saw it through production on location in Massachusetts.


You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: For "Fighter," a Long Count Before Release



Marketing the Dead

The Grateful Dead that is. The Grateful Dead are known for being at the top of the counterculture, yet they had (and still have) mass commercial appeal. How does something like that happen? According to David Meerman Scott, it takes a lot of good old fashioned marketing that begins with making a connection with their fans.


The Grateful Dead was a touring band that happened to sell records too. Most other bands of the time toured to support record sales. Artists today need a true connection to fans. That might be by doing what the Dead did and create improvisational shows that were each unique and then tour a lot to build a rabid following.


You can read the entire article on Hypebot.com: Interview: David Meerman Scott, Author Of Marketing Lessons from the Grateful Dead


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - August 13, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - August 6, 2010

1,564 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     People Don't Buy Books Based On the Publisher - The Creative Penn

Never has a truer statement been said. I would take it one step further: people buy authors, not publishers.

  

     Writing vs. Storytelling - Nathan Bransford

What makes a bestseller? Is it the quality of the writing or the entertainment value of the story?


Film


     Filmmakers must deal with variety of obstacles - California Chronicles

Making a movie is so easy...wait, no it isn't. Sometimes it takes an almost inhuman amount of patience to get a movie made.


     Embracing the Unknown - Truth Seekers

Crisis is a universal element of any quality storyline. What makes that leap of faith interesting isn't necessarily the faith, but the leap itself.


Music


     51 Marketing Ideas for Film Music Composers - heather fenoughty

Think it's hard finding an audience for your CD? Try finding a filmmaker if your specialty is writing music for film.


     Your "One Thing" For Better Voice - Judy Rodman

When it comes to singing, you shouldn't be a jack of all trades. Be a master of one.


-Richard


Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 10, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 3, 2010 Edition

1,477 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, musicians, filmmakers
1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 Previous Next

Actions