Skip navigation
1 2 3 Previous Next

Resources

33 Posts tagged with the brand tag
1

Auditing your brand

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 4, 2017

 

In a previous post, I discussed the importance of auditing in the business world. It's a practice conducted on a regular basis in order to gauge past performance and current levels of inventory. Essentially, it's used to get an accurate barometer of where a company stands financially. The results of the audit determine how the company will move forward in the most productive way possible.

 

 

 

As an author selling a product, you are a business, and you should be doing periodic audits just like companies with thousands of employees. Before, I encouraged you to audit your readers. Today, I'd like to explain the importance of auditing your brand. You want to take a deep, hard look at what brand practices have been hurting your business and what brand practices have been helping your business. It can be a comprehensive and difficult task, but here are few core metrics you will want to understand in order to build your brand.

 

 

 

1. Where: What platforms are you using to build your brand? Hopefully, you're using multiple platforms. If you aren't, consider changing your strategy and incorporate two or three to help grow your brand's community. If you are using multiple platforms, rank them. Determine which one results in the most engagement and make that your primary plank in your platform. Look into ways you can advertise on the site in a cost-effective way, and bring more people into your brand's community.

 

 

 

2. How: Are you sending a consistent message? Remember, an author brand shouldn't be all things to all people. It reflects your true self. The best way to stay on message is to do just that, be you. Don't try to be what the reader expects you to be.

 

 

 

3. How often: Are you active enough on social media? Are you posting a status update or tweeting only a couple of times a week or are you doing it multiple times a day? Like it or not, the more active you are, the better your opportunity to grow your brand and sell more books.

 

 

 

These are just three areas of your brand strategy you should examine first. The more you conduct these audits, the more nuanced they will get, but for now, set dates on your calendar to audit your brand four times a year to examine these three key elements of building your author brand.

 

 

 

 

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in?

 

Be Authentic to Build Your Brand

 

How to build a brand without even really trying

 

 

 

 

1,103 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, promotions, brand, branding, author_brand, author_advice
13

The emotional brand

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 20, 2017

You may be diligent about keeping your social media accounts active. You may be tweeting umpteen times a day. It's possible that you are updating your status consistently and frequently. Your fingers may even hurt from all the friend and follower engagement you're conducting from your laptop and/or smartphone. You may be putting in more than enough time to expect steady growth in your social media connections which will lead to the expansion of your brand, and ultimately, more book sales. But it's quite possible your activity isn't paying off either.


The question is why do some authors succeed at growing their brand through a rigorous social media strategy and others don't. The answer is usually those who succeed have discovered what truly sets an author brand apart from other brands. That one simple ingredient that so few authors use out of a fear of sharing too much or being too provocative. That one simple ingredient is emotion. An author brand is an emotional brand. It conveys a heart and soul that corporate brands normally steer clear of. You are an artist first and a commodity second.


If you are angry about something in the news or in your neighborhood, convey that anger. If you are embarrassed or happy or sad, share those emotions. You will connect with your community on a deeper level and that will lead to a growth of your brand. In short, give yourself the same kind of emotional depth that you give your characters in your book, and you will find that brand success if you've been looking for.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

Evaluating your author brand

The one thing



1,572 Views 13 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, social, brand, branding, social_media, author_marketing, author_brand
0

Elections can excite voters. They can enrage voters. They can disgust voters. They can inspire voters. Elections are orchestrated chaos that remind most of us that nobody really wins when we talk politics. That's why I don't want to do that here, but I would like to try to do the impossible. I would like to talk about the elections while avoiding the political nature of elections.


    You see, I think elections provide us mega-sized examples of concentrated brand-building efforts, and we, as authors, can learn from them--both from the successes and the failures within an election season. Here is a list of successful tactics by candidates that authors should keep in mind as they build their own brands:


  1. Consistent messaging wins the day. Forget the substance of what any politician says. A message that is repeated over and over again influences hearts and minds. It's an old advertising strategy. Seeing an ad once doesn't move a consumer to consume. Seeing the same ad/message over and over again moves a consumer toward consumption.
  2. The more you're seen, the more you're heard. Politicians who succeed are politicians who get the most coverage. They seize every opportunity they can to own the narrative of an issue.
  3. Frequent contact is essential. Politicians are not shy about reaching out to their followers for either financial support or help in spreading the word. Email lists, social media platforms, and good old fashioned real world glad-handing keep supporters enthused and engaged.
  4. Personal appearances are crucial. No politician sits in his or her basement making YouTube videos, forgoing the opportunity to be seen in public. They get out and speak to groups of people. They literally put a face, style, and voice on their brand. They encourage the dissemination of these appearances far and wide via the internet and mainstream media outlets. They make themselves a product, and focus on the most optimal placement of the product so it can be seen by as many voters as possible
  5. Speak to your demographics. Politicians know their typical supporters inside and out, and they spend a lot of time and energy making them happy and getting them fired up.


Not everything is a lesson worth learning from a politician building a brand, but there are a lot of proven strategies that authors should modify and adopt for their own brand-building efforts. You never want to lose yourself in building a brand. You just want to showcase yourself and your work. Whether you agree with them or not, that's exactly what successful politicians do.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in…

Repeat, repeat, repeat

Book marketing is a numbers game



1,218 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, author, publishing, brand, author_brand, marketing_strategy
0

Consistency is the key to success. Technically, it's also the key to failure. After all, simply doing something with consistency in and of itself isn't how people reach the pinnacle of success. It's doing the right things with consistency that allows people to reach the pinnacle of success. In the case of building and maintaining a brand, we've discussed the right things to do. We've talked about your Author Declaration. We've covered the need to prioritize your brand's platform, and we've touched on ways you can use the secondary planks in your platform to effectively support your primary plank.


In this post we are going to focus on the need for consistency in utilizing your brand-building tools. Note: Consistency does not equal constant activity. You are allowed to take breaks from your platform. In fact, you need to take breaks from your platform. Your brand is you, and if you're spending all your time building your brand, well, that doesn't make much for brand material.


Consistency means setting a schedule and building expectations that you meet by following that schedule. Let's say you commit to writing three posts a week for your blog, and you've picked Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday as the days in which you will post to your blog. Commit it to a brand-building calendar. If it's video you've decided to use as your primary plank, keep a calendar for production, post-production, and uploading. Make yourself accountable. Stick to the schedule. Your brand depends on it. Your book sales depend on it.


On those occasions when you will be taking breaks, work those into your calendar, too. On those times when you will be absent from your platform, consider giving the reins of your platform to a guest blogger or vlogger. Give them guidelines so they won't veer too far from your brand identity, and make sure they commit to maintaining your schedule, so your friends, followers, and readers will stay connected to your brand in your absence.


Doing the right things on schedule is the type of consistency that will help build your brand and give you a living platform.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Author Brand Success: Consistency without Stagnation

Be Authentic to Build Your Brand



1,498 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: promotion, brand, social_media, platform, author_brand, bloggin, vlogging
0

 

    I talked about prioritizing your platform in a previous post. By that, I mean give your platform three planks from which you operate. One of those planks will be used as your primary source for brand exposure. The other two planks will be used as support planks. In other words, they will be used in the following ways:


  1. You will use them as funnels to your primary plank. Let's say you've decided to make video your primary online plank. When you complete a new video and post it to your online channel, use your support planks to drive traffic to your video. Or if your blog is your primary plank, use your support planks to drive traffic to your latest post.
  2. Your support planks can be used to satisfy the need for immediacy. Let's say you've just sold the movie rights to your novel. Use your support planks to send out a headline-worthy announcement with the promise of more details to follow in your primary plank. Whenever you need to get out the word quickly, your secondary planks can come in handy.
  3. Your support planks can also be used to engage your readers in special Q & A chats. This is a strategy that can come in handy for your newest release. You more or less reverse your plank priority in this case. Use your primary to give a detailed account of the release and the time and date of the Q & A, then just make yourself available to respond to questions as they come in on your chosen secondary plank.

 


The structure should be fairly obvious. Your primary plank is for long-form content and your secondary planks are for short-form communications. The point is to form a synergistic relationship between all the planks and give your brand room to grow.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in…

 

Growing and Cultivating Your Online Community

 

An Active Author Brand

 


 


1,514 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, brand, branding, social_media, author_marketing, author_brand
1

This is the time of year that makes us most aware of our calendars. There are so many holidays on the horizon that it can be a little daunting, especially if you haven't been preparing for the days ahead and the obligations they bring. Outside of this cluster of holidays, the year is full of others more evenly dispersed from month to month.

 

From a marketing standpoint, you should be aware of them all. Holidays are opportunities for those of us with books to sell. Campaigns can be geared around each one to maximize sales. The trick is to plan. Don't check the calendar at the beginning of the month and decide to jump on the next holiday. Create a marketing calendar in January and map out where you're going to focus your marketing efforts throughout the year. Commit to developing a strategy to make sure you get as much out of the opportunity as you can. Be painstakingly specific about what you'll be doing to prepare starting weeks ahead of the holiday. Do not let anything sneak up on you.

 

Preparation is the key to success in marketing. Having all your ducks in a row also makes it less stressful once the campaign gets underway. This is the entrepreneurial part of being an indie author. It requires you not only to think outside the box, but also to make every day count. Whether that day is committed to reviewing marketing plans, developing marketing plans, or launching a campaign, depends on your marketing calendar. Plan your days and be prepared to take advantage of the unique opportunities holidays provide.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

Setting Goals for Your Brand

Build a Plus & Minus Brand Map

1,662 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, selling, writers, promotions, brand, branding, social_media, author_brand, marketing_advice, marekting
1

Brand Modeling

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 10, 2015

We are all about the author brands in 2015. Your brand, as I've stated in the past, should be based on a foundation of high quality writing. That is the foundation, the most important element of your author brand, yes, but it's not the only element. So what else is there? What are the other components to building an author brand?

 

The answer is that the list is endless. It would be easier to herd cats than it would be to tell you what you should focus on to make a successful author brand. It's important that I make a distinction here between brand and platform. Your platform is essentially your delivery system for your brand. It's how and where you get your message out. Your brand is your message, and that message must be customized to your style and personality.

 

What you can do is dissect and analyze successful author brands and use that knowledge to help you build your own brand. It's called modeling, and here are the three traits you should look for when you diagnose other authors' brands:

 

  1. Persona: Do they use humor as a part of their brand? Are they focused on inspiring their followers? Do they set out to educate their fans?

  2. Tone: Do they present themselves in a light, friendly manor or are they slightly brisk and cynical?

  3. Appearance: Is their attire and appearance laidback and fun, or do they dress to the nines?

 

Find four or five successful authors that you admire, and find out what makes their brands tick. Once you have the data in hand, you'll have a better handle on what's right for you, and you're well on your way to building your own successful author brand.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

 

You may also be interested in?

 

The Three Planks of Your Author Platform

The Foundation of Your Brand

2,077 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, self-publishing, promotions, brand, branding, social_media, author_marketing, author_brand, brand_identity, author_platform, brand_development
0

It's reminder time. We discuss author brands on this blog quite a bit and strategies on how to build that brand. There's a lot of focus on social media and creating a community. We talk about personal videos, book signings, fan interaction, etc. There are numerous ways to build brand awareness.

 

But perhaps what we don't talk about enough is what the foundation for your brand should be. True, there are numerous considerations to take into account when you look at building your brand: genre expectations, reader demographics, the core of your platform, etc. Those are all things that will help you shape the message on which your brand is built, but they aren't the foundation of your brand. There is one simple factor you must use as the foundation for your brand. This one element is indestructible. If you put your artistic heart and soul into this one component, everything else you do is window dressing that simply complements it.

 

What is the one thing? Good writing. If you commit to perfecting your craft each and every time you sit down to write, your brand will be as solid as Mount Everest. Good writing--or better yet, great writing--is the key to giving you the will to put all the other pieces of a brand into place over the course of your career. If you find your voice as an artist, you will find your voice as a brand, and you can only find that voice through committing to becoming a better writer each time you set out to write.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

Branding 101: The Keys to Successful Branding

Branding vs. Marketing for Authors

2,573 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, book, author, self-publishing, publishing, brand, branding, platform, author_brand, marketing_strategy, brand_awareness
2

I sense a coming disturbance in the Force, and that disturbance is of my own making. I'm going to discuss something brand-related today that is completely superficial. It's not something I take joy in, but it's something that we must talk about because it matters. Fair warning: Some of you may become agitated by what is said here today. Now, let's jump right into it before I lose my nerve.


 

Do you pay attention to your physical appearance? It's a weird question to ask someone who wants to write for a living. After all, it's a profession that requires a lot of alone time. Sitting in a room by yourself and living inside your head for huge stretches of time doesn't exactly require proper grooming or presentable attire.


 

But I'm not referring to your "writer look." I'm referring to your "author look." Before you snap a selfie or step in front of a video camera, do you take the time to make sure your image matches the brand you're trying to cultivate? Now, understand what I'm saying. From the beginning, I've encouraged you to present a brand that reflects the real you. Don't manufacture a persona that you think people expect you to be. Be you. That philosophy is still at play here, but with a slight caveat. Don't let your appearance reflect your mood of the moment; let it reflect your normal state of being. If you are a laid-back cowboy that writes about your experiences on the range, don't step in front of a camera wearing a three-piece suit because you want to look nice. The same goes for buttoned-down attorneys writing legal thrillers. If you show up at an appearance in a sleeveless T-shirt and bicycle shorts because you just didn't feel like dressing up, you may throw your fans for a loop.


 

When you are building your brand, appearance matters. But it doesn't matter that you dress to the nines. It only matters that you dress in a manner that accurately represents your brand.

 

 

-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

 

You may also be interested in...

An Active Author Brand

Productivity vs. Perfection

2,575 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, writing, brand, branding, author_brand, marketing_strategy, brand_identity, author_appearance, marketing_advice, marketing_tip
4

I self-published my first book in 2005. From the moment I had the trade paperback in my hand, I knew it wasn't going to sell itself. I scoured the Internet for information on how to sell books. The old world of publishing dominated the landscape at that time, so it was difficult parsing all the information to find strategies that fit an indie author. Slowly, I scratched and clawed my way through the gnarly marketing jungle and carved out a small, but growing niche for myself. I became known as an author who writes horror novels for young adults. It was a status that suited me just fine...at the time.

 

But I am an artist, and I like to experiment. I wanted to write something outside of the horror genre for an older audience. I tried doing just that under my name. It worked and it didn't. The book turned out as I envisioned, but most of the reader base I had built just wasn't that enamored with the work. Why should they have been? It was outside of their preferred genre, and it was written for a different demographic. I went back to my bread and butter and, as much as I enjoyed writing the other material, I decided I couldn't waste my creative time on it.

 

Then an idea came to me that I just couldn't shake. It wasn't young adult, and it wasn't horror by any stretch of the imagination. The characters, setting, and story were so clear in my mind that I couldn't help but write it. I decided early on that I would publish it, but not under my name. I would use a pen name.

 

I found it very liberating to write as someone else. If you're considering switching genres and trying something new, you might find it freeing as well. Using a pen name removes the expectations of the audience of readers you've established. Even if you choose to market to that same audience, they'll likely have a clearer understanding of the differences between your titles if you explain your choice of going with a nom de plume. You'll be able to experiment with style and language in a way you probably could not have under your established name.

 

So if you want to stretch your creative chops and untangle your imagination, I highly recommend publishing under another name. You may discover you've unwittingly been holding yourself back in certain areas. Once you exorcise those demons under a different name, you will satisfy the artist in you and become a better writer.    

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Should Authors Ever Reinvent Their Brands?

Brand Audience vs. Book Audience

8,570 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, selling, self-publishing, sales, writing, genre, brand, craft, marketing_strategy, brand_identity, demographic
1

In order to build an author brand, you have to know more than what you do well; you have to know what you don't do well. In other words, what are your weaknesses?

 

It's a fair assumption that, as authors, our strength lies in writing since that's what we do. Maintaining a blog? That may be easy for you since most of blogging relies on the written word. Participating in social media? Again, not a huge leap from our normal writing pursuits, though the style is different from platform to platform. It's a given that everyone will be better at some marketing activities over others.

 

But creating a brand goes beyond tactics and has more to do with who you are as a person. So what are your branding weaknesses? As you dive in and do a little soul-searching on the topic, look beyond the various media that make up your brand-building toolkit, and examine your personality traits as well. Are you a positive person who enjoys lifting people up? Then don't adopt a combative persona just because you think controversy sells. Are you the type of person who speaks your mind in a clear and entertaining manner? Then go for it. Don't avoid showcasing your true personality because you think it will conflict with the readers of your genre. To put it succinctly, don?t lead with your weakness just because you've seen that particular trait work for another author; lead with your strength.

 

It's absolutely essential that you know who you are in order to build a successful author brand. It's not a revelation that comes to you immediately; it's something you will discover as you build the foundation for your brand. You'll know what feels right and what doesn't each time you take an action toward building your brand. Those things that feel right, those are your strengths. Your weaknesses are those things that just don't feel quite right. Over time, you'll hit your stride and leave those weaknesses behind.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Is Your Brand Built for Controversy?

Branding 101: The Keys to Successful Branding

2,392 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, writing, promotions, brand, craft
3

The Internet is a "knock-around" place every once in a while. Here's an example: something is posted on a social media site that is ripe for a cutting and witty retort. In turn, that engenders an equally cutting and witty retort in response. Things escalate. Soon, the retorts grow less witty and more personal. Threats are made. Feelings are hurt. Your list of recipients for your holiday newsletter grows shorter. All because you thought a particular post could use your special brand of charm and flavor.

 

Chances are you've seen something like this happen online. The lesson here is that some things just don't need to be said. I learned that during the most recent U.S. election. In truth, I learned it several elections ago, but sometimes I just can't help posting about politics. Trust me, I'm getting much, much better at letting things go, and that's because I've adopted a "type and wait" policy. I type my response, but I don't post it. Instead, I move on to something else that occupies my time for 15 or 20 minutes, and then I come back to my response. I read it and then decide if I should post it or not. Nine times out of 10, I delete it and feel so much better for having done so. It truly did not need to be said.

 

We all know the topics that cause the most conflicts online (and in person, for that matter): religion, politics, tragedies, etc. People have strong emotional ties to these types of topics, and they should. But those emotions can lead to people feeling slighted or attacked if their position is challenged. Since you are an independent author trying to build a solid brand, you should be extra careful how you approach these situations to avoid tarnishing that brand. My advice is to let them have their say without feedback if you don't agree. If you absolutely can't let a post slide without comment, avoid argumentative language, especially - and I hope this goes without saying - profanity or name-calling.


I can tell you from my own personal experience, on that 10th time when I break down and post a reply, I rarely feel good about it. I fret and worry whether I've done the right thing. I can easily lose a night's sleep over it. It can easily be avoided by sometimes just leaving things unsaid.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...


Recognize Your Readers

Publicity Stunts

3,223 Views 3 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, promotions, brand
0

I recently had dinner with my friend Lauren Lyons Cole, a certified financial planner based here in New York City. She's gaining quite a following, as evidenced by this feature in the New York Times.

 

Lauren mentioned that she was planning to write a book, which didn't surprise me given how much knowledge she has to share. However, what did surprise me - in a good way - was how much she's already done for a book that hasn't yet been written. "I've wanted to write a book for two years now, but instead of diving headfirst into the manuscript, I first focused on building my brand and my network," she told me.

 

Lauren hasn't yet decided if she's going to pursue traditional or self-publishing, but no matter who ends up publishing her book, here are five things she's already done to help with marketing (in her words):

 

  1. Get quoted as an expert in the media. Make connections with journalists who cover your field. No need to pay for expensive PR; just be genuine and trustworthy and the journalists will be happy to use you as a source. It's mutually beneficial. Respond quickly to any requests they send you!
  2. Target respected publications. It's almost always more beneficial to be quoted in the NY Times than your local news. Send story ideas to journalists who write for a publication you'd like to be quoted in. Journalists are often looking for fresh ideas. Again, it's mutually beneficial. Just don't be annoying or waste their time.
  3. Carve out a niche for yourself and differentiate yourself from your peers. Don't necessarily write about what people would expect. That makes it easier to market your book. Gain real life experience in the angle you want to take. (For example: I focus on helping people make more money rather than frugal living tips.)
  4. Find a platform. Build relationships with groups that will help you promote your book. This could be speaking at conferences or writing guest posts for your favorite blogs. The more readers (or attendees) the better. The more people who see your book (and you), the more people will buy it.
  5. Audition for reality TV shows (I mainly think this is funny). Personally, I'm hoping to be on Amazing Race. I figure that's a great way to promote my book. And if not, at least I'll get to travel and compete for a million dollars.

 

Lauren wisely recognizes that when it comes to marketing non-fiction, having a solid author platform is critical. So take her advice: If you know you can write a great book, first spend time developing an audience that you think will buy it.

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

What Should You Blog About?

What Should Authors Tweet?

6,228 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, self-publishing, writers, promotions, brand
2

In today's marketing environment, the key to building an author brand is giving readers access to...well, you, the brand. Authors today rely heavily on social media to build their fan bases. That means in addition to promoting your books, you are now in the business of promoting your social media presence.


To keep it simple, I'll focus on promoting the Facebook page dedicated to your author brand. However, you'll find most of these strategies can be applied to promote your presence on other social networks as well. Here are five quick tips for promoting your Facebook page:


  1. Link your Facebook page's URL in your email signature. Email is arguably not as popular for marketing as it used to be, but you can still take advantage of its promotional possibilities. The email signature is the perfect place to link to your Facebook page because it gives people a chance to connect with you outside of the inbox.
  2. Link to your Facebook page on your blog. A separate page on my blog lists all the different ways people can contact me. I've received a number of Facebook friend requests and fans by making this information accessible on my blog. If people are already hanging around your website, chances are they're interested in seeing you on social networks as well.
  3. Include link information in your YouTube videos. You're doing videos, right? Of course you are, because we've talked a lot about how it can build your author brand! Your videos present golden opportunities to promote your Facebook page. Just include a graphic at the end of each video telling viewers where to go.
  4. Personalize your Facebook page's URL. Facebook gives you the option of creating a customized URL that can tout your brand and make it more attractive to search engines. The customized web address will look something like this: http://www.facebook.com/yourauthorname. A personalized URL is easier for fans to remember and pass along to their friends.
  5. Include your Facebook page URL in your author bio. If someone is interested enough to read your bio, you want to give them a place where they can learn more. What better place than a Facebook page to give readers direct, personal access to their new favorite author?


Building a brand sometimes feels like an around-the-clock task, but in this case, the hard part is putting the pieces in place. For instance, once you've included your Facebook page URL on your email, bio, and blog, you won't have to do it again. If you want your brand to grow, give your readers the access they expect from authors today and invite them to join your conversations in social channels. Just remember, when fans contact you, engage with them. The more you engage, the more they'll spread the word about your work.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Reverse Journaling for Your Brand

Setting Goals for Your Brand

7,760 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, self-publishing, self-publishing, self-publishing, self-publishing, facebook, facebook, facebook, facebook, brand, brand, brand, brand, social_media, social_media, social_media, social_media
0

Today it may seem like I'm dipping my toe into the waters of the metaphysical because I'm going to discuss a form of visualization that I think will help you achieve your goals. While on the surface it appears somewhat ethereal in nature, I do believe there is a practical interpretation as to why it works. This method can be used for anything in your life, but for our purposes, we're going to focus on branding.

 

This form of visualization is custom-built for writers because it involves the practice of journaling. Traditionally, we use a journal to document events in our lives. But we are not going to use our journal in that way. We are going to document what we want to happen as if it has happened. Picture yourself 40 years into the future. Every dream you've had for your writing career has come true. From this place of achievement, write down how you got there. Since we are focusing on branding, you're going to reveal how you built your successful author brand. How many social media followers and interactions did you accumulate over the years? How many total views did your personal videos collect? How popular was your blog? On which TV shows did you appear? Describe in as much detail as you can how your brand became so widely known.

 

Now, do I believe that because you've written it down in a journal that your brand will take off on its own? No, but I do believe that using this method will help you see what it truly takes to build an author brand and help you come up with a strategy that works for you. There may be something to the axiom, "If you believe it, you can achieve it." But I'm more inclined to believe it's easier to get somewhere if you know how to get there. Consider giving this form of reverse journaling for your brand a try, and see if it can show you how to achieve your goals.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Branding 101: Brand Sabotage

Be Authentic to Build Your Brand

3,221 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, author, author, author, journaling, journaling, journaling, brand, brand, brand, branding, branding, branding, visualization, visualization, visualization
1 2 3 Previous Next

Actions