Skip navigation
1 2 Previous Next

Resources

17 Posts tagged with the brand_identity tag
1

In my old life, I sold broadcast video equipment. One of the products we sold was a character generator for live broadcasts. I was tabbed as the trainer for the equipment and sent to Waterloo in Toronto, Canada, to spend a week at company headquarters to learn as much as I could about the product. With the exception of the airline losing my luggage, it was well worth the trip. My company liaison gave me a tour of the facility and our first stop was research and development. I was shocked to see their primary competitor's product sitting in pieces on one of the work tables. My tour guide chuckled at my confused look and said, "That's what you call reverse engineering. Don't worry. We paid for the machine."

 

Turns out this is a common practice in the corporate world. What better way to know how to beat your competition than to know how they construct their product? You can do the same, even though you really don't have competition as an author. Remember, my philosophy about books is that a well-written book by a fellow author only helps you sell more books because readers always want more. It's a healthy addiction.

 

But, that doesn't mean you can't look at successful authors in your genre and deconstruct their brand to help you understand how to build yours. How often do they post to social media? Do they use email newsletters? Do they do a lot of personal appearances? Do they utilize personal videos?

 

Knowledge is power. You can learn a lot just by reverse engineering another author's brand.

 

-Richard

 

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

You may also be interested in...

Reverse Journaling for Your Brand

Evaluating Your Author Brand

691 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: writing, branding, author_marketing, author_brand, brand_identity
1

 

We have established that an author brand is not a corporate brand and it isn't quite a personal brand. It's a hybrid. You are selling a product and that product is tied to your brand, but the public has certain expectations when it comes to author brands that they wouldn't accept in a corporate brand. They expect authors to be much more candid than corporations, one might even say they expect author brands to show more emotions than corporate brands. Don't get me wrong, corporate brands do have an emotional identity, but it's usually a safe emotional identity. Author brands are given more leeway to be more expressive.


Do you know your emotional identity, and does your emotional identity match your genre? Before you answer that question, remember that I constantly preach that your author brand should be nothing more than a reflection of who you really are. Don't manufacture an online persona to match what you think you readers expect from you. For example, if you write horror novels, don't feel pressured to post macabre thoughts and creepy poetry to convince your readers that you are your genre. Be yourself.


But, your emotional identity is tied to more than how you express yourself online. It's also tied to what you share. Horror book and movie reviews, horror-themed convention and book fair news, and Halloween events: these are all horror-themed shares that will help establish your emotional identity without having to fake a "haunting" persona. The same strategy can be used for any genre and subgenre. Yes, be expressive, much more so than a corporate brand, but don't fake it. Be true to yourself.


If you've never asked yourself if your brand's emotional identity matches your genre, it's time to do so. 

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in…

 

You are the brand not your book

 

Building your author brand

 

 

 

 

746 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: writers, genre, branding, brand_identity, author_advice
0

That one thing

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Mar 1, 2017

 

Why you? It's a question you need to ask. You are trying to build a brand--not just a brand, but an author brand. That means there are books tied to your name. The ultimate goal is to sell those books, and your sales will stem from how you answer this question: Why you?


There are millions of books to choose from on the market. More are added every day. Every hour of every day. Readers are flooded with choices. Why should they choose your book over the others? The answer--in most cases--is you. Your writing style, your public persona, your celebrity endorsements, whatever the reason, you are the one factor that sets your book apart. Yes, quality of writing, publishing track record, and scores of other reasons are factors too, but in today's brand-driven economy, who you are is a major factor in your success.


You need to sit down and do a close examination of your brand, determine what the unique component of your brand is, and build on that. Expand your community. Call it your special ingredient. Maybe it's your sense of humor or maybe it's your spiritual perspective on life. Perhaps you're not just a science fiction author, but an actual scientist who writes science fiction.


Once you find that one thing that makes you different from other author brands, you'll have a better understanding of where to find readers, and how to keep them invested in your brand. You'll increase your readership just by being you. Now, why you?

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in…

 

Evaluating Your Author Brand

 

An Active Author Brand

 

 

 

 

1,317 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: author, branding, social_media, author_marketing, author_brand, brand_identity
0

 

I'm not going to lie. It is hard living a life, writing a book, and building an author brand all at once. It takes almost superhuman abilities to pull off every part of being an author today without falling short somewhere along the way. Stuff happens, and suddenly you find yourself having to choose which area of your authorhood matters most to you. Invariably, the writing will always win, as it should.

 

 

Here's the fix for that. Keep this one fact in mind, and you will find the resources to do everything you need to do to build your author brand and sell books. OK, be prepared to have your mind blown. You are not alone, and there is one aspect of your brand-building strategy that is tailor-made for incorporating the kindness of friends. That is the world of blogging. You are essentially the editor-in-chief of your blog. Your network of friends in the arts community is your staff of writers. Give them space on your blog to discuss whatever they feel passionate about.

 

 

You are giving them a platform, and they are giving you content that will attract visitors. It is a mutually beneficial arrangement. Right now, you probably aren't in the position to pay them, but your future goal should probably move in that direction. That way you can have more editorial control over what they write. For now, you don't have that luxury. That's why you're going to want to choose very carefully to whom you give space on your blog. Make sure that they don't stray too far from your brand identity.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Your secret weapon

 

How to help the author in your life

 

 

1,259 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, blogging, outreach, brand_identity, marketing_platform, social_meida
1

No one wants their authors to be all business. If you take to your virtual space and constantly post about your books or about the world of publishing as a whole, you are going to chase potential readers away.


Your author brand has to be multidimensional. I know it sounds counterintuitive, but you can&'t focus all your energy on your role as an author when branding yourself as an author. You are a commodity. It sounds simplistic, but it&'s true. There are millions of books available to buy. What sets your book immediately apart is you, the author. Yes, the issue of style and the quality of your writing and storytelling are crucial, but there is no denying that the author is often the draw.


So, as you build your platform, plan on devoting a good chunk of your online time to discussing and participating in topics outside of your books. Reviewing books in your genre, discussing hobbies, sharing stories about your passion projects outside of writing, these are all things you can focus on. You can even go totally astray and publish fluff pieces about your pets, family, friends, etc. Your options are unlimited.


The point is that you are more than an author. You are a human being who dabbles in real life as much as any respectable human being. The more adventurous you are, the greater the material you'll have at your disposal. So, get out there and jump at the opportunity to do something interesting, if for no other reason than it will beef up your author brand.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in?

Building an Author Brand: You are What You Share

An Active Author Brand



1,243 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, writing, social_media, brand_identity, author_platform
0

 

You most likely started writing because you were inspired by your favorite author, and you have deeply rooted memories of a book written by that author that changed your life. That inspiration and those memories became part of your writing essence. You've probably even incorporated that author's style and evolved it into your own.

 

Recognizing that influence is important when you're building an author brand. There's a good chance that the book that stirred your writer's brain inspired others, maybe not to write, but to read more books by the author and more books in the genre. That means there's a ready-made fan base hungry for more material.

 

We've talked before about knowing your brand identity in order to be successful as an author. It would be easy to emulate the brand of the author that influenced you, but if you do that, you have a good chance of being overlooked. Instead, you want to focus on building your brand around those elements that set you apart. Your style is similar to that of your idols, but remember, it's an evolved version.

 

When you introduce yourself to this ready-made fan base you want to be something similar but original. Openly share your passion for your idol and the genre, but don't be shy about announcing that you offer something different. It may be a small difference, but it's a difference nonetheless.


Your goal as an indie author is to take risks. Adapting a known style with your own artistic spin is a great way to hook your idol's fan base and grow your readership.

 

 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

 

 

Elements of the Author Brand

 

An Active Author Brand

 

 

 

1,647 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, promotion, author_brand, brand_identity, brand_awareness, brand_development
0

Building an author brand isn't strictly an exercise in social media strategies. Some of the most fruitful things you can do to build your brand are to participate in offline events. Here are four offline strategies to help you strengthen and expand your author brand.


  1. Personal appearances: Whether it's book signings, public readings, speeches, presentations, etc., if you're offered a public appearance, and you trust that the venue will not tarnish your brand, accept it. Accept as many as you can. If you're not confident in your ability to address a crowd of people, take public-speaking classes or join an organization like Toastmasters to hone and develop your skills.
  2. Conferences and book fairs: Go where you're likely to find readers and fellow authors. Get some good old-fashioned networking in, face-to-face style. Make contacts that will continue in an online environment, and take extra care to interact with these particular friends whenever possible. Because of your real world meeting, these types of relationships can be more rewarding than those folks you've only met in an online environment.
  3. Writer's organizations: Find a group of writers that meet at least once a month and become an active member. Provide constructive criticism and share new works to be critiqued. The bonds between fellow writers can be extremely strong and go a long way in helping expand your author brand.
  4. The arts community: Find organizations that support the arts community as a whole in your area. Attend meetings regularly and offer to give the writer's perspective on the life of an author in your neck of the woods. Writers are severely underrepresented in these types of groups, so don't be shy about being the voice of authors during gatherings. It's your duty.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

 

Consider advertising your book locally

 

How to make a personal appearance a success

 


 


1,424 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self-publishing, social_media, author_marketing, author_brand, brand_identity, personal_appearance
0

Your value

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jul 27, 2016

If your author brand has no value, it won't succeed. That's really all it boils down to. You can examine various ways to market your brand. You can implement strategies to expose your brand to more potential readers. You can take to social media and follow the advice of the gurus and do what they've told you to do to build awareness for your brand. You can do all these things and perhaps achieve brief blips of success, but sustained brand success is tied directly to its value.


So, in the case of an author of fiction, what is this brand value? To simplify things let's divide it into two parts. First, it is a mastery of one's craft. The quality of the writing matters. The skill to tell a compelling story is the most crucial element of this value strategy. Your job as an author is to take every opportunity to improve your writing, word by word.


The other part of the value strategy is the art of persistence. With a few exceptions, author brands are built on books, not just one book. To give your brand even more value, you need to establish a publishing track record, and you shouldn't bring a book to market without adhering to the first part of the value strategy. Publishing a lot of books that are poorly written doesn't get you any closer to showing your brand has value.


If there's a third element to the value strategy, I would say it is time. Value isn't something that can be established quickly. It is the product of dedication. Dedicate your time to building value into your brand.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

You may also be interested in…

The Lasting Brand

Evaluating Your Author Brand



1,307 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, self-publishing, writers, branding, author_brand, brand_identity
1

Brand Modeling

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 10, 2015

We are all about the author brands in 2015. Your brand, as I've stated in the past, should be based on a foundation of high quality writing. That is the foundation, the most important element of your author brand, yes, but it's not the only element. So what else is there? What are the other components to building an author brand?

 

The answer is that the list is endless. It would be easier to herd cats than it would be to tell you what you should focus on to make a successful author brand. It's important that I make a distinction here between brand and platform. Your platform is essentially your delivery system for your brand. It's how and where you get your message out. Your brand is your message, and that message must be customized to your style and personality.

 

What you can do is dissect and analyze successful author brands and use that knowledge to help you build your own brand. It's called modeling, and here are the three traits you should look for when you diagnose other authors' brands:

 

  1. Persona: Do they use humor as a part of their brand? Are they focused on inspiring their followers? Do they set out to educate their fans?

  2. Tone: Do they present themselves in a light, friendly manor or are they slightly brisk and cynical?

  3. Appearance: Is their attire and appearance laidback and fun, or do they dress to the nines?

 

Find four or five successful authors that you admire, and find out what makes their brands tick. Once you have the data in hand, you'll have a better handle on what's right for you, and you're well on your way to building your own successful author brand.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

 

You may also be interested in?

 

The Three Planks of Your Author Platform

The Foundation of Your Brand

1,968 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, self-publishing, promotions, brand, branding, social_media, author_marketing, author_brand, brand_identity, author_platform, brand_development
0

Our march forward into the brand-building enigma has brought us to the brands with which you surround yourself. I'm not talking about the kind of soda or beer you drink or the kind of shoes you wear. I'm talking about the authors you endorse.

 

And by endorse, I mean read and pitch. When you allow room on your virtual stage for another author, you aren't just letting your friends, followers, and fans know about a fellow writer. You are linking your brand with said author's brand. It's unavoidable.

 

I'm not telling you this to discourage you from endorsing other authors. I'm telling you this to encourage you to endorse only those authors you feel passionately about. Make sure you're turning your community on to a writer whose work you admire. If you latch your brand to another author who is merely an acquaintance, and you've either never read their work or you had a tepid response to their material, you run the risk of tarnishing your brand.

 

Your brand is capital. Spend it wisely. If you misspend it, it could cost you impassioned readers. As I've relayed before, there is a well-known bestselling author who I no longer read. Why? Because I picked up a number of books the author had endorsed, and frankly, the books were poorly written. And it wasn't just my opinion. The books were panned by readers and critics alike. I felt cheated, like the bestselling author gave a loyal fan base no consideration whatsoever. Needless to say, I was very disappointed, and I don't see myself ever buying another one of the author's books again.

 

Your brand is your brand until you start turning your readers on to another author. Then it becomes a shared-brand. Be careful with whom you share your brand.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

 

Building an Author Brand: Identifying Your Core Values

Tips for Networking with Other Authors

3,174 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: promotion, readers, branding, author_brand, marketing_strategy, brand_identity, author_advice
2

I sense a coming disturbance in the Force, and that disturbance is of my own making. I'm going to discuss something brand-related today that is completely superficial. It's not something I take joy in, but it's something that we must talk about because it matters. Fair warning: Some of you may become agitated by what is said here today. Now, let's jump right into it before I lose my nerve.


 

Do you pay attention to your physical appearance? It's a weird question to ask someone who wants to write for a living. After all, it's a profession that requires a lot of alone time. Sitting in a room by yourself and living inside your head for huge stretches of time doesn't exactly require proper grooming or presentable attire.


 

But I'm not referring to your "writer look." I'm referring to your "author look." Before you snap a selfie or step in front of a video camera, do you take the time to make sure your image matches the brand you're trying to cultivate? Now, understand what I'm saying. From the beginning, I've encouraged you to present a brand that reflects the real you. Don't manufacture a persona that you think people expect you to be. Be you. That philosophy is still at play here, but with a slight caveat. Don't let your appearance reflect your mood of the moment; let it reflect your normal state of being. If you are a laid-back cowboy that writes about your experiences on the range, don't step in front of a camera wearing a three-piece suit because you want to look nice. The same goes for buttoned-down attorneys writing legal thrillers. If you show up at an appearance in a sleeveless T-shirt and bicycle shorts because you just didn't feel like dressing up, you may throw your fans for a loop.


 

When you are building your brand, appearance matters. But it doesn't matter that you dress to the nines. It only matters that you dress in a manner that accurately represents your brand.

 

 

-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

 

You may also be interested in...

An Active Author Brand

Productivity vs. Perfection

2,496 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, writing, brand, branding, author_brand, marketing_strategy, brand_identity, author_appearance, marketing_advice, marketing_tip
0

Confidence: it is a magnet for success. Athletes know it. Business moguls know it. Top entertainers know it. It's not necessarily a secret, but it can be an elusive state of being to achieve. Let's face it, if it were easy to feel confident, we'd all wave at each other from our own yachts. Earlier, I wrote about how to find your strength as a writer. This blog discusses why I think it matters.


Arrogance is often mislabeled as confidence. The two are similar in meaning, but while confidence attracts admirers, arrogance can repel them. Confidence means you are self-assured and comfortable with your ability to do well. Arrogance means you are overly-assertive in your insistence that you are the best. There are some cases where an arrogant attitude is fashionable. Athletes often insist they are the best at their sport, and they are forgiven because their prowess can be demonstrated on the field or on the court or in the ring.


 

Authors are less appreciated when labeled as arrogant. The key to building a successful author brand is to exude confidence without even trying. Here's how to tap into that Zen-like feeling: know your craft. Practice it every day. Understand the elements of story and constantly challenge yourself to be a subject matter expert when it comes to writing. Study your preferred genre. Know the intricacies of your chosen category. Never stop learning how to write better. And, as we discussed before, know your strengths.


 

If you are in a constant mode of growth as a writer, confidence is an inevitable side effect of that growth. If you want your author brand to succeed, never rest on your laurels. Live in a state of Zen by creating confidence through knowledge, both of your craft and yourself.


 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

Evaluating Your Author Brand
Be Authentic to Build Your Brand

2,624 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, author, promotion, writers, writing, branding, author_brand, brand_identity, author_advice
2

For all the mystery that surrounds the reason why one brand hits and others don't, there are basic building blocks to establishing a solid brand. When I say basic, I mean they are so simple a child can implement them. I call them the three C's of brand-building, and they are as follows:

 

  1. Communicate - In order to establish a brand in today's social-media-driven world, you have to communicate with your customers. Since we're looking at this from an author's perspective, that means we have to engage with our readers whenever we can. If someone comments on your personal blog, respond to the comment. If someone comments on your Facebook status, at the very least "Like" the comment (if it's appropriate to do so). The point is to not let your communication with a reader be one-sided.
  2. Consistency - A brand is not built in one day or one tweet or one status update. A brand is built over time using the same tone and style over and over again. In our globally connected world, things are generally compartmentalized into niche groups. Your brand fits into one of those groups. If you're consistent with your messaging, it's highly likely other members of that group will discover you and help you grow your brand influence.
  3. Commitment - You have to be committed to building a brand. It's not something you establish on a whim. You have to contribute to your brand message frequently. It doesn't matter if it comes in the form of a blog post or social media update or personal video. You have to commit to contributing original content to your brand on a regular basis. The more you do, the greater the likelihood your brand will hit.

 

Building a brand is not rocket science. Follow the three C's, and you'll be well on your way.

 

-Richard

 

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

 

 

You may also be interested in...

 

 

Feature Reader Testimonials

Say Yes!

6,786 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: blogging, facebook, branding, social_media, author_brand, brand_identity
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How Much Attention Should You Pay to Book Design? - The Book Designer

Designing your book inside and out is a crucial component in the indie author's journey.

                           

Becoming an Author - How Do You Spell Success? - The Future of Ink

In today's publishing world, the author doesn't just have control over their ability to succeed; they also have control over how to define success.     

 

Film

                                                        

The Long Take & the Tracking Shot - In Layman's Terms...

A look at how technology and evolving filmmaking techniques have changed the long take in movie making.    

                                          

Writing from Theme - Screenwriting from Iowa

Why summing your story up in one sentence can help you write more effectively.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

5 Mistakes Artists Make in Promoting Their Music - Intern Like a Rockstar

Do you know how to sell yourself and your music?

 

How to Create a Brand Identity Statement as an Artist - Bob Bakers TheBuzzFactor.com

Do you know how to tell fans and potential investors what kind of music you play? 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- June 27, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- June 20, 2014

2,367 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: filmmaking, formatting, book_design, movies, sales, musicians, screenwriting, filmmakers, book_sales, brand_identity, music_production, music_branding, film_production
1

The Honesty Brand

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 29, 2014

It's time for me to drop a reminder that building an author brand isn't really that difficult. I think that some indie authors get so bogged down by brand-building strategies that they forget what it is they're trying to build. Before you read any further, it might be helpful if you take a few minutes to look at yourself in the mirror.

 

I'm going to assume that you did as suggested and simply say that the person who was looking back at you just now is your brand. You are your brand. There's no manufactured image behind your brand. There's no set of steps you have to go through in order to create your brand. There's no team of marketing gurus that are going to instruct you on how to dress and how to behave in a certain way in order to project a brand that people will embrace and follow.

 

It's just you, and the only thing you want to project in order to have a successful brand is a comfort with who you are, and the best way to do that is to not try and be something you're not. Don't hitch your image to trends you don't believe in or a point of view you think is popular. Your best tool to building an author brand is honesty. You don't manufacture honesty.

 

There is no need to make this complicated. Just be yourself. If you never stray from that strategy, you'll put out a consistent message over time. That consistency will attract friends and followers. Those friends and followers will buy your books. All because you were just being you.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

Consider Advertising Your Book Locally

Do Awards Help Authors Sell Books?

2,496 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: book_marketing, branding, author_brand, brand_identity, author_tips
1 2 Previous Next

Actions

Filter Blog

By author: By date: By tag: