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309 Posts tagged with the craft tag
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I listened to an archived public radio interview with the late David Foster Wallace not long ago, and he made an interesting statement about his writing process. He said that he spent approximately an hour a day writing, then he spent the rest of the day worrying about not writing. Hearing a legendary talent make such a statement made me feel so much better about my own process. Every time I step away from the computer, I kick myself for not writing. I worry that I haven't written enough for the day.

 

Here's what I've come to believe: worrying about not writing is essentially writing. My mind's eye instinctively latches onto a point of the story I walked away from, and I, almost in a panic, focus on what's going to happen next. I replay it over and over again, adding details as I return to the starting point and play the scene out to its conclusion. I wouldn't do that if I wasn't worried about not writing.

 

So, this is strange to say, but I'm thankful for this almost obsessive inability to let go of the guilt of not writing enough. Without it, I might not be able to construct a story. I might not ever be able to develop my characters, or plot out conflicts and conclusions. If I didn't worry about not writing, I might never write.

 

So, to you, my fellow writers, I say embrace that worried feeling that you're not writing enough. It's all part of the writing process.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Life Outside of Writing

Is There Value in Formulaic Writing?

861 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self-publishing, writer, writing, craft, writing_tips, writing_advice
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I have a book that will be released in July of 2016, and it's a bit of a different experience for me than my previous publishing adventures because I have no immediate plans to release it in print. Long story short, this is a team project, and I don't have the final say on the format. Hopefully, I can expand it into print, but for now, I have to think strictly eBook.

 

That is a bit of a mind shift for me. For a number of years, I have been doing releases in both eBook and print formats. The print copies have always been an easy marketing tool for me. I could take a number of copies with me to appearances or events and devise giveaways to boost enthusiasm for a new release. Online marketing is great, but the personal appearance is still king when it comes to connecting with readers.

 

I have committed to doing a book launch for this new eBook release that involves a personal appearance, and it has presented me with a bit of a puzzle. How do I get people excited at an appearance when I won't have a book to appear with?

 

At a recent workshop for playwrights, as I watched staged readings of other writers' work, it hit me. I don't need the book. I just need the story. I went home and hammered out a plan for an appearance that involves short dramatic readings of chapters using local actors. I will involve other writers I know to adapt and direct the material for these staged readings. I'll incorporate door prizes that fit the theme of the book for the audience. I'll make it an invitation-only intimate affair with a number of nonprofessional social media savvy friends in attendance. I have to say it is the first of my appearances that will be more about the people attending and performing than it will be about me, and I'm so excited by that. They will take ownership of my story, and the marketing of the eBook. My hope is that it will translate into a frontloaded wave of word-of-mouth buzz that will grow over time.

 

Don't ditch the personal appearance if you're planning an eBook-only release. Find a way to get attendees at the event engaged and enthusiastic, so they will spread the word via their social media platforms.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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How to Make a Personal Appearance a Success

How to Make an Author Event Eventful

1,372 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, book, print, kindle, ebook, craft, online_marketing, book_launch, book_launch_party
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Your Average Reader

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 9, 2015

Read any advice about marketing, and you will invariably find a common refrain: know your average reader. That's easy to write, but how do you know whom your average reader is or where your average reader can be found? Here is my best advice on how to easily locate your average reader.

 

  1. Genre: Your book belongs to a certain genre, and that is great news. Genres come with baseline demographics. True, it won't provide a representation of every reader you want to reach, but it gives you a good indication of whom your average reader is.

  2. Other Books: As original as your book may be, it still bears some similarity to other books. Again, that is great news, particularly if the book was a bestseller. You will more than likely find fan groups online, and you will get an ideal virtual snapshot of your average reader.

  3. The Mirror: Provided you haven't written a young adult novel or a book for children, your average reader could look and act a lot like you. After all, the odds are you wrote with passion, and that passion came from being a fan before you started writing your first book. Reverse engineer your own habits and hangouts.

  4. Subject Matter: Let's say you've written a crime novel featuring a protagonist who psychically communicates with cats. You, my friend, have a niche book, and niche books have well defined average readers. I'm guessing it would take you no time at all on a search engine to find groups that are fascinated by cats with psychic abilities.

 

Once you've found your average readers, reaching out is a matter of getting involved in their online communities and introducing yourself as an author. Don't push. Participate. Be a valued member of their communities, and they will become curious until they aren't just average readers, but your readers.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

 

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Find Smaller Markets to Sell More Books

It's Not Just a Hobby, It's a Marketing Opportunity

3,586 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, selling, readers, writing, craft, branding, target_audience
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Competency

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 25, 2015

What makes someone successful? How does someone make it to that next level? It's a question I ask myself as an author all the time. How did famous author John Doe go from unknown to mid-list to well known? Is he a better writer than me? Is he luckier? Is he more handsome? When somebody makes it and you don't, you either pick apart their success or you pick apart your lack of success.

 

As somebody who's studied the issue ad nauseam, I think I've uncovered the formula for succeeding as an author. Talent and luck do play a factor, no doubt. But the driving force behind success for an author, for an athlete, for a politician, for a manager of a grocery store is competency. Knowing your craft, knowing the market, knowing your genre, knowing your readers, these are all the building blocks of competency. Competency doesn't happen by accident. It's a consequence of focus. Once you possess this competency, your marketing efforts will become a bit more effortless and a lot more effective.

 

Notice I didn't use the word confidence. Confidence and competency are two different things. You can be confident and lack competency. However, very few competent people lack confidence. So, yes, I think confidence is key to success, but only if it's born out of one's competence. Confidence without the competency anchor isn't a reliable ingredient for lasting success.

 

So, get the focus. Concentrate on improving your craft. Develop the curiosity to know your readers. Study your genre. Do these things, and the competency will follow. Soon after comes the success.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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How to be a Confident Writer

How to Find Success

915 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writing, success, craft, author_advice
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The best way to grow as a writer is to invest in your writing. Here are three ways you can do just that:

 

  1. Buy a book on grammar and editing: I know, I know. Why do you need a book on grammar and editing when that kind of information is at your fingertips online? I'm a supporter of something I call "tactile commitment." When you own the information in book form, it's my belief that you'll be more likely to reference it. Don't worry; this isn't the part where I link to a book on the topic that I've written or get commission for selling. The decision of which book to own is yours. All I want to do is encourage you to make such a book a part of your permanent library.
  2. Take a creative writing class or join a writing workshop: One of the best investments I've ever made has been the investment of time spent learning from other writers. I meet with two different groups every month. In the meetings I read my own new material and critique material written by other authors. It's a supportive and constructive environment. I get the benefit of improving my material and forming relationships with fellow writers. It's a win-win.
  3. Teach a class or workshop: Contact a library, theater, or independent bookstore and offer to conduct your own workshop. Teach other writers your style and philosophy. You're a writer. Spread the knowledge. You will more than likely learn something invaluable by teaching others.

 

Your goal as an artist is to improve. The only way to improve is to make an investment in your craft. As you can see, from a monetary standpoint, it doesn't cost an arm and a leg. For the most part, it will cost you time, but I promise you it will be time well spent.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Why Novelists Should Join a Playwrights' Group

Your How-to-Be-a-Novelist Syllabus

1,371 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, indie, writing, craft
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It's a question that doesn't produce a consensus. It's probably even foolish to explore, but that sort of thing has never stopped me before. Let's face it, what makes a book readable has a lot to do with individual tastes. There have been enormous bestsellers that I have found painfully unreadable, and there have been obscure titles that have gained no popular traction that I have devoured over and over again.

 

So, beyond personal proclivities, what makes a book readable? Yes, character development is a huge consideration. Story structure is pivotal. Setting matters a great deal. But they all pale in comparison to one often overlooked element to a book's readability factor: the writer's passion for the story. A reader can tell when a writer approaches a piece out of a sense of obligation instead of a sense of desire. It's obvious in the language used. There is a nuanced, invisible connectedness between author and story that etches itself into the pages (paper or electronic) when the writer approaches the story from a place of passion. Readers pick up on that. They gravitate toward it. They want to be a part of it.

 

Writing without passion is probably not something a lot of indie writers have to deal with. But if you sit down to write and the passion isn't there, walk away. Divert your attention toward something that brings you joy. Find a headspace that opens you up to feeling, a hunger to tell your story and get back at it. Write with passion.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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When to Walk Away from a Story

Change it Up!

3,592 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: writing, draft, craft, book_writing, indie_authors, author_advice, story_writing, novel_writing
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I have homework for you. You can choose to do it or not, but I strongly believe that if you do, it will help you be a better writer. You will practice your craft with a confidence you had not previously known. You will feel an artistic self-worth that will bolster you from word to word as you write your next masterpiece. This isn't a magic assignment. It is one that will simply force you to dive deep into your belief system and examine your internal writer's creed. In short, your assignment, should you choose to accept it, will be incredibly rewarding.

 

Here's the assignment. Imagine, if you will, that you are a teacher, and you've been asked to develop a syllabus for a class on how to be a successful novelist. You won't just be teaching your students about writing, although that will be a part of it. You will be teaching them about rewriting, editing, branding, marketing, etc. Anything and everything you can think of that makes up the job of today's novelist.

 

Here's the best part, you get to decide which section counts the most in your fictional class. You have 100% autonomy on this project because you aren't required to show it to anyone. This is simply an assignment to suss out what you truly think makes a novelist.

 

Now, if you so choose, you could take it one step further and actually put the syllabus to use. You could contact your local library and volunteer to teach a course on how to be a novelist using your syllabus as a guide, but that's not necessary to achieve the ultimate goal here, which is for the novelist to know thyself.

 

Now, go forth and develop your syllabus. Know thyself.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Consciousness-something within oneself-awareness:

What is it to be a true writer?

1,296 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, selling, book, author, novels, craft, branding, social_media, author_brand, writing_tips, writing_advice, writing_practice
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When I'm working on the first draft of a novel, at times it can feel like I'm pushing an enormous boulder up a mountain. Have you ever had that feeling? It's during those periods that I have to trust what I've learned over the course of writing multiple books, which is that I have to keep going. So day after day I force myself to sit down and inch the story along, however slowly, because I know that by doing so, I will eventually reach the end.

 

Moving the story forward is the key to finishing the first draft. When I was writing my first novel, I spent far too much time tweaking what I'd already written instead of advancing the plot. At the time I thought that approach was a good use of my creative energy, but looking back I realize it was a form of mental procrastination. As a result it took me MUCH longer to finish that book than any of the ones I've written since. Now I don't go back and tweak or do any form of rewriting until I'm pretty much done with the (always rough, sometimes ugly) first pass. I still edit along the way, but I try to avoid anything major until the basic framework of the story is complete.

 

Believe me, there have been many occasions where I've had to tell myself "Maria, this book isn't going to write itself!" just to get myself to sit down in front of my computer. But I keep pushing that boulder up the mountain, slowly but steadily, because I know how great it will feel when I reach the top and get to watch that first draft roll down the other side and (eventually) turn into a fully formed novel.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Writing Tip: Stay Committed to the Process

Discipline to Write

2,501 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, promotion, blogging, writing, writing_process, craft, writing_tips, author_tips, editing_process, writing_adivce, tips_from_author
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I once hated the most crucial aspect of writing a book: rewriting a book. Writing a book is a huge investment of time, and it also requires a significant emotional investment. I mean we authors are experiencing many different lives going through conflict after conflict. That kind of thing takes its toll. When I finished a first draft, the last thing I wanted to do was reshape the manuscript.

 

But as the years (now decades) have passed, rewriting has become my favorite part of writing a book. For one thing, the knowledge going in to a project that mistakes will be corrected in rewrites is so freeing. It helps take a little bit of the sting of perfection out of the first draft. Not only do I not mind if there are holes in a book after the first writing, I happily expect them.

 

Another thing I've realized is, in a very internal way, I create relationships with these imaginary characters that I think up in my head. We spend hours, days, weeks, months together. Rewriting a book allows me to get to know them better. It allows me to recognize why they were so special to me and helps me dive deeper into their strengths and flaws. It gives me the opportunity to give them depth.

 

The final thing that has helped me to embrace rewriting is the appreciation I have for a challenge. To essentially rethink parts of a story that took me so long to write is a real challenge that pushes me to develop as an artist.

 

Rewriting is an opportunity to relax, reconnect, and rethink. How can I not embrace it?

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Use Two Brains for Writing and Rewriting

AAUGH! Rewrites!

4,044 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, writers, revisions, writing, characters, drafts, writing_process, craft
2

In our last post about word count we discussed the importance of setting a goal early on in the process. For this blog, let's focus on how you're going to reach that goal. Theories abound on the best approach to amassing the words necessary to complete a book-length manuscript, and over the years, I've probably tried them all. Each philosophy has its merits, and there is no right way to reach a word count goal. Here are the three things to keep in mind as you move towards your goal:

 

  1. You don't have to take a daily word count approach. Let's face it: writing isn't just the act of typing. A lot of times it's the act of ruminating over an idea, scene, piece of dialogue, etc. You shouldn't beat yourself up if you let a day or two or three slip by without adding actual words to your story. They're building up in that gray matter of yours. If you're the type that likes to wait until a scene or chapter is fully realized in your mind, that's a legitimate approach. Don't let anyone tell you differently.
  2. The Stephen King approach is admirable but not for the faint of heart. The master of horror has stated that he commits to a daily word count of 2,000 words. That's a hearty pace, and it's not for everybody. During NaNoWriMo, I approached that kind of output, and I have to say I found it invigorating. In a way, it felt like I was in training for a marathon
  3. Commit to a single word a day. I'm not kidding. I love this approach, especially for beginning writers. It removes the pressure of being productive and takes away the anxiety of sitting down to write. The secret here is that once you convince yourself you only have to write a single word a day, you relax and far exceed your. The writer's mind is full of fun ideas, but it';s also easy to trick it into doing some actual work.

 

When mapping out how to reach a word count goal and deciding which strategy works best for you, there are two things you want to keep in mind: your personality type and your timeline. If you work best under pressure and you've set an ambitious release date for your book, obviously high volume output is for you. If the pressure to create makes you less productive and creative, and you're not in a hurry to get your book to market, take your time with a low volume approach.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

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Setting Goals for Your Brand

Got Writer's Block? Step Away from the Keyboard

2,794 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, indie, publishing, writing, craft, word_count, writing_tips, writing_advice
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Make a Living with Your Writing - The Creative Penn

Joanna Penn reveals how she turned a passion for writing into a writing career.          

                           

Practice the Process - Retinart

To get good at what you do, you have to know how you do what you do.          

 

Film

                                                        

From the Archives: Famous Filmmakers - Huffington Post

Three filmmakers, known for taking risks, sit down with HuffPost Live to discuss the art and business of filmmaking.        

                                          

DIY or DIE: 10 No Budget Filmmaking Musts - Indiewire

Simple ideas that help you stay under the smallest budget. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Music Marketing with YouTube: Four Ways to Beef up Your Channel - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

The power of video has long been a marketing asset for musicians.  

 

The Many Hats of an Indie Musician - Day in the Life of a Commercial Musician

It's a juggling act, but you get to do what you love.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- May 8, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- May 1, 2015

2,107 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, music, author, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, writing, promotions, musician, music_marketing, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, practice
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In our second stage of writing a book, we need to establish the miles you'll be logging on this journey. We've discussed word count on this blog before in a number of different ways. Today, we want to establish what your final word count will be, or if not establish, at the very least, estimate.

 

Wait, you say, I've only just begun. How can I possibly know how many total words my book will be? Establishing a word count goal can be tied to many different factors. Genres adhere to unofficial word count parameters. The type of book – novel, novella, or novelette – comes into play when deciding word count. Are you doing a novel and releasing it in a serialized format? That can impact your total word count on a per release basis. You are a factor in establishing a final word count. Are you on a timetable? Do you have an outline that maps out plot points precisely, and in order to keep to your vision, a certain word count works that breaks the unwritten genre rules?

 

Unfortunately, there's no formula for coming up with a definitive word count, but I will say that every time I've set a word count total, I have either reached that total or surpassed it by 10-15 percent. There's something about knowing how far you need to go that allows you to find your pacing.

 

If you want to make an educated estimate, you can search this blog or the internet for word counts based on genre. That is your best place to start before making your final decision.

 

-Richard

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General Word Count Guidelines

Stage One of Writing a Book: Idea Exploration

2,664 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, editing, writing, craft, words, word_count, writing_tips, editing_process
2

Here's a small marketing idea that could lead to expanded exposure on a global scale. It's not groundbreaking, but it won't break your budget either. It's a long-haul plan, so don't expect an immediate return on your investment. Think of it as a side project that has the potential to grow your brand in a big way.

 

I live in a community that has a fairly large number of bed-and-breakfasts, small inns not affiliated with national chains, and vacation rental homes. The amount of amenities varies from establishment to establishment, but virtually all of them have a bookshelf filled with books. The titles usually cover a number of different genres and categories to match the variety of tastes of the different guests that stream in and out throughout the year. Why can't some of those books be written by you?

 

These places are either independently owned or run by small rental companies. It would be easy to find contacts and offer to send signed books for them to place in their properties. You would, of course, include a personal note in each copy inviting guests to join you on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. Presumably, these guests could come from all over the globe. This could be a real opportunity to make contacts far and wide.

 

I've stayed in a number of these establishments myself, and even though I have an electronic reading device, I always end up going through the book collections made available to guests looking for a physical book. Who knows? Maybe next time I'm staying at a bed-and-breakfast, I could be reading your book.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Marketing Tip: Set up an Author Page on Amazon

The Brand and the Pseudonym

2,494 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: books, self-publishing, promotion, book_marketing, craft, social_media, author_brand, marketing_ideas, marketing_strategy, book_exposure
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The Plot Plight

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Apr 22, 2015

My favorite book is an obscure title first released in 1933 called God's Little Acre by Erskine Caldwell. Well, it's obscure now. When it was released, it was actually both a commercial hit and the subject of controversy because it was deemed vulgar by some. By today's standards, it's not nearly as provocative as it was in the 1930s.

 

I write about it today because I can make the argument that the book is without a main plot. The catalyst for the action in the beginning is the patriarch of a deeply impoverished family's obsessive search for gold on his dying farm. It's a fruitless endeavor that ruins the farmland. This search for riches serves as a backdrop to the lives of the family members and the hardships that weave them together. There's an illicit affair that tears the family apart. There's a strike at a nearby cotton mill that ends in tragedy. There's a murder. The book is basically a scrapbook of events that paints the sad portrait of a family plagued by poverty. The futile search for gold is less a plot than it is a shadow cast by the family's endless misfortune.

 

A plot is described as the main event of a book that gives a story meaning. Other events, subplots, give a story depth. My dissection of God's Little Acre has me questioning my sanity. A book, I've been taught, must have a clearly defined plot. I've been encouraged to establish the plot early in a story. And I've been told repeatedly that a book cannot end without some sort of resolution to that plot. Caldwell did none of those things in God's Little Acre, but he managed to write a compelling, truly enriching story. How is that possible?

 

So, here's my question to you, dear writer, what is your philosophy on plot? Where is it established in your story? How clearly defined is it? Can you think of a book that contains a muddled plot, but still manages to deliver a gripping story?

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Importance of Plot Points

The Purpose of Subplots

1,879 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, author, writing, characters, plot, development, craft, writing_tips, plot_point
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Build Your Email List with a Free e-course - The Future of Ink

Build your brand by sharing your knowledge.           

                           

So You Think You Finished a Novel - Kameron Hurley

The joys and pains of rewriting.         

 

Film

                                                        

The Five Laws for Hollywood Success - Filmmaking Stuff

Five common sense rules that anyone can follow.     

                                          

Making a Horror Film? These Six Steps Could Make You a Legend - Movie Pilot

An extreme horror fan reveals the secrets of the scary film arts. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

How to Refine Your Singing Style - Easy Ear Training

Your voice is unique, but it still most likely fits into one of five styles.  

 

Listening to Tight Voices? Danger: It Can Tighten Your Own - Judy Rodman

Your voice automatically attempts to mimic what you hear.  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- April 10, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- April 3, 2015

1,649 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, film, author, self-publishing, promotion, indie, movies, blogging, promotional, films, promotions, book_promotion, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, singing, writing_novel, flim, film_tips
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