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518 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
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It's time to explore building your brand outside of the boundless arena of the virtual world and look at how you can build your brand in the real world. And the best way to do that is using a tool that most people dread, public speaking. Here are three ways to help you improve your public speaking skills.


1. Toastmasters: You've no doubt heard about this organization. There is a nominal fee to join, so it's not free. You will be both a speaker and listener as you practice the art of public speaking and help other members develop their skills as public speakers. The criticism is constructive and meant to help you grow. It is a well-known organization for a reason. It works.


2. Acting Classes: I know. I know. You didn't become an author to advance your career as an actor. Acting may be something that doesn't interest you in the least or it may even terrify you beyond belief. But the point of joining an acting class isn't to start your journey to winning an Oscar. It's for you to get comfortable with "performing." Giving a speech or doing a reading is just that, it's a performance. An acting class can help you own the podium and make your appearance memorable.


3. Improv Classes: Again, I know. Doing improv is most likely not your fondest desire. But thinking on your feet is a crucial tool as a public speaker. Not everything is going to go as planned, so being able to respond gracefully and seamlessly with humor is a key component to giving a successful speech or reading. As the Boy Scouts say, always be prepared. In this case, preparation deals with handling the unexpected.


Public speaking isn't a natural fit for most people. The only real way to succeed at public speaking is to practice public speaking. Doing so in a group with other motivated learners is the best way to master it and overcome your fear.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Offline brand building

How to scare readers

306 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, writers, promotions, public_speaking, branding
0

 

If your book is done and published, you've already learned that the first question most people ask when they find out you've written a book is, "What's it about?"


Do you have a good answer to that question? If not, you might have a problem.


Coming up with a good hook (or angle, or one-line description) isn't easy, but it's important. Movies are supposed to have good hooks, but sometimes they can get away with "STARRING INSERT HUGE NAME HERE." That doesn't fly with a book, especially one that doesn't have a massive marketing machine behind it.


To come up with a compelling one-line description, I suggest you brainstorm a handful - they don't have to be polished or even grammatically correct at first - and then try them out on people you trust to be straight with you. This is important, because while many people like to help, not everyone is cut out to provide honest feedback. Do you have a friend who has no problem sending a meal back at a restaurant if it's not cooked just right? That's the kind of person you want for this job!


Even if your helpers haven't read your book, you should be able to tell by their facial expressions if they find your description interesting. Your initial options should be quite different, which will allow you to pick one that generates the best reaction. For example, should the one-liner be about a fire that devastated a neighborhood, or a burned jewelry box that revealed a family secret? Those things could both be true about your story, but which one gets the best reaction from your test group?


After you've narrowed down the options to one or two key angles, play around with a handful of descriptions for each angle, then whittle the overall list down again. Keep repeating this process until you have a winner!


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Grab Readers' Attention with Your Hook

Kick-start your year with these two marketing ideas

334 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writers, hook, one-liner
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What is a blog tour?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 19, 2017

A blog tour, also sometimes called a virtual book tour, is when a number of book blogs post a review of a title during a set period of time, e.g. a couple weeks or a month, usually right around when the book launches. As with a traditional book tour, the goal of a virtual one is to create "buzz" by reaching avid readers (i.e. potential customers) through multiple channels. If they suddenly see your book popping up everywhere, they are more likely to check it out - or so the thinking goes. Along with a book review, the blog may also feature an author spotlight, a Q&A, a guest post, a giveaway, an excerpt of the book, or a combination of any of those things, depending on what you're willing to do.


If you're raising your eyebrows right now wondering what book blogs are, they're exactly what they sound like: blogs dedicated entirely (usually) to book reviews. I say "usually" because some also review additional products according to the taste of the blog's owner.


There are plenty of companies that will coordinate a blog tour for a fee (a simple Internet search will turn up many), but you can also set one up yourself if you have the time and the energy. All you need to do is reach out to book bloggers (ideally a few months before your book comes out) and politely ask them if they'd like to review your book. You can also offer to do a Q&A, a guest post, etc. (Click here to see my post on how to find book bloggers.) Always offer to email a MOBI or PDF file, which doesn't cost you anything. If a blogger will only accept print copies, be sure to request the book rate at the post office to keep your costs down.


It takes a lot of coordination and follow-up to set up a blog tour on your own, but you can do it. I promise!


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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What Is a Virtual Book Tour?

Marketing tip: How to find book bloggers

519 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, blog_tour
1

Always be learning

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 18, 2017

When I was younger, I entered the world of sales for a company that sold professional grade audio visual equipment. I jumped into the job with enthusiasm because I was familiar with the equipment as an end user. I thought I knew everything I needed to know to sell the equipment I knew so well. I was wrong. I would soon learn that, as much as writing, selling is a craft.


My boss sat me down on my first day and gave me a quick tutorial on sales. "There are two things you need to know about sales," he said. "One, once you ask the customer if they are going to buy, shut up. Don't say another word. If you talk first, you've lost the sale. Two, remember your ABC's. Always Be Closing. Introduce yourself, get the customer's name, repeat the customer's name, make your pitch, and then ask them how they want to pay. The first time you ask, they're going to think you're crazy. The second time you ask, they're going to think you're a pushy salesman. The third time you ask, they're going to give you their credit card number." That was it. That was my only training before I got on the phones and started practicing the craft of sales.


When I turned to writing and publishing as a career, I realized the ABC principle could be applied to branding because branding, as much as sales and writing, is a craft. Instead of closing, I would substitute the concept of learning. Always Be Learning. It's the best way to grow your brand. Research and read about branding. When you run across a branding principle three times, incorporate it into your brand-building strategy. It may work. It may not, but the point is to constantly expose yourself to new ideas. It's the only way to structure a brand that can stand the test of time.


Always Be Learning.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Lasting Brand

Evaluating Your Author Brand

607 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions
1

LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) is free for a basic account, so if you don't already have a profile, I highly recommend creating one. Here are some ways to promote your writing along with your other professional accomplishments:


Include the cover image of your book as the background to your headshot


To change the blue template background that appears on most LinkedIn profiles, click on the little pencil on the right side of your profile. That will open the Edit Intro window. Once inside the window, click on the little pencil on the upper right side to upload a file from your computer. (See my LinkedIn profile for an example.)


Describe your writing style and website in your headline and/or summary


The headline appears directly below your headshot, and the summary appears a few inches below that (beneath the city in which you live). To edit either or both, click on the little pencil on the right side of your profile. For example, my headline says "Bestselling novels, about life, love and friendship," and my summary says, "I write contemporary fiction and occasionally give speeches on the crazy story behind how I became an author: www.mariamurnane.com." (Depending on your profession, you might prefer to have your headline about your day job and your summary about your book.)


Add writer/author to your work history


Even if you have a full-time job, why not cite that you're also an author in your work history? Scroll down to the Experience section of your profile and click on the little pencil to open the Edit Experience window. When asked to name an employer for your author position, add your author website.


Add your book (or books) to your profile


Scroll down the Accomplishments section and click on the "+" icon to open the window. One of the options to click is Publications. Here you can include a description of your book(s), as well as links to purchase pages on Amazon.


Note: In addition to individual profiles, LinkedIn also hosts countless private groups that could prove helpful in providing networking opportunities, e.g. college alumni, fraternity/sorority clubs, writing groups, etc. It's worth poking around to see what you can find!


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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How big is your digital footprint?

Are you making this marketing mistake?

480 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, linkedin
0

Sharing

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 11, 2017

 

Do you know what is at the heart of your brand or of any brand? It has nothing to do with your appearance. It has nothing to do with your style. It has nothing to do with your platform. It has nothing to do with your books. I should say it has nothing to do with any of these things while simultaneously having to do with all of these things. This thing that is at the heart of your brand is sharing.


Your brand is defined by what you share. Whether it's information, a video, a link, or a photo, what you share defines how you interact with your community and not just your community. What you share has the potential to reach beyond your community when your friends and followers share it with their friends and followers. In fact, what you share and not your books may be how many people are first introduced to you. Once they themselves have joined your community, they will hopefully read your books out of curiosity.


So, given that sharing is at the heart of your brand, what you share and how often you share are extremely important to the success of your brand. First, what you share should reflect the persona you are trying to establish. Second, you should be sharing as frequently as possible. Think of spreading the word about your brand as a numbers game. The more you share the more likely it is your brand will be discovered and grow.


Sharing, it's not just a great lesson to teach your kids. It is the heart of your brand. 


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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You're not just an author, you're a brand

 

Building an author brand: you are what you share

 

 

 

 

291 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, branding, author_brand, author_platform
0

The selfie paradox

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 27, 2017

 

We all know what a selfie is, right? In case you've never heard of the favorite marketing tool of every self-obsessed celebrity over the last fifteen years or so, here's how Wikipedia defines the term "selfie":


A selfie is a self-portrait photograph, typically taken with a digital camera or camera phone held in the hand or supported by a selfie stick. Selfies are often shared on social networking services....They are usually flattering and made to appear casual. "Selfie" typically refers to self-portrait photos taken with the camera held at arm's length or pointed at a mirror, as opposed to those taken by using a self-timer or remote.


Now, 99.999% of you didn't need that definition. You know what a selfie is, and you probably have a very strong opinion regarding the act of one taking a picture of oneself and posting it on the internet for the world to see. It just seems unnecessary.


I have both decried the selfie culture and participated in the selfie culture. I won't attempt to explain my own hypocrisy because there is no rational explanation that is satisfactory. I simply know the value of selfies when it comes to branding for indie authors. You are the brand. Brands need a face, and what better face than your own face. So, I have turned on the front-facing camera on my phone and snapped a picture or two or three or more over the years. But, I would like to make one thing perfectly clear, I have never donned a duck-face in my entire life. My selfies are usually reserved for events or vacation spots. I may have even snapped a picture of myself in excruciating artistic pain as I rewrite an old manuscript. The horror!


My point is, don't be so fast to ditch the selfies because you just can't bring yourself to be that self-absorbed. They are valuable tools for building an author brand and building an author brand is one of your primary jobs as an indie author.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Marketing Tool Many Authors Neglect

Six-Second Branding with Apps

447 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, publishing, writing, promotions, selfie
2

 

Has it hit you yet? You are an author. No. You're more than that. You are an indie author. You possess something authors working under the restraints of a book contract don't possess. You have freedom. Freedom to write and publish whatever you wish. There is no one to tell you no or question your every literary move. You are in complete control.


With this power comes great responsibility. You have a sacred contract to fulfill as an indie author and that is to take advantage of your freedom and honor your independence. Take risks. Give readers something they could never get from a traditional publishing house.


I'm not suggesting you arbitrarily take a risk. I'm suggesting that you not always make the commercial choice. Write what your heart tells you to write. In essence, be true to yourself. It's what will set your books apart from other authors.


You not only owe it to you and your readers. You owe it to the industry. Change is the key to not just sustaining the publishing industry. It's the key to growing the publishing industry, and if traditional publishers are sticking to formulaic storylines and cookie-cutter characters, there is only one place that all important change will come from, you and your fellow indie authors.


So, I ask you again. Has it hit you yet? You are an indie author, and that makes you a pivotal part of the entire publishing industry. The constant state of change needed to keep the industry relevant starts with you.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Living the Indie Author Dream

 

Your Job as an Indie Author

 

 

 

 

966 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, self-publishing, writers, publishing, writing
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Learning the ins and outs of marketing a book can be a daunting task. There is so much to learn and so few opportunities to put that knowledge to use. It takes months to write a book and weeks to rewrite a book and get it ready for publication. That leaves you a relatively short amount of time to put your marketing acumen to use before your focus is shifted to your next book.


You need to keep your marketing mind sharp, and the best way to do that is to actively market a book, but it doesn't have to be your book. Why not use that marketing know-how and market a book for another indie author?  Partner with another author, and share your knowledge. Not for payment, but for the experience.


I know, I know. You have your own book or books to worry about. You have writing to do. You have a day job, a family, friends, etc. Who has time to help another indie author market a book?


Don't think of this as extracurricular activity. This is part of the education of an indie author. This is how you hone your skills and grow your marketing knowledge. This is how you help market your own book. This is also how you create a partner. Someone who will feel the tug to help you market your book when you publish your next tome.


In short, this isn't more work for you to tackle. This is an opportunity for you to sell more books. 


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Uniting author brands

Selling others sells yourself

391 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing
0

I have wrestled with the notion that email lists are still relevant in today's social media driven world for some time now. I am rarely excited when I get an email from one of the many groups, stores, and artists that have somehow gotten my email address. And by "somehow," I know exactly how. In my dazed and confused consumerism state of mind, I gave them my email thinking I would receive something of value from them in my inbox. I now realize these emails are almost never value-based. They are simply attempts to trigger my state of consumerism. And, in the end, I feel used.

 

Having said all that, I have come to the conclusion that email lists can be useful. I don't think they should be your primary source of marketing, but I do think they have a place in your marketing strategy. The key to making them successful is to think of one's inbox as a sacred place. One where trust can be strengthened between an author and reader. Don't use your email lists to sell something. Don't violate the reader's trust in that way. Use your email lists to inform your readers, and use it sparingly. I get emails from some establishments three and four times a day. Before I eventually take the time to unsubscribe from these lists, I will continue to do what I do now. Delete them without reading them. DO NOT ABUSE YOUR EMAIL LIST!

 

Make receiving an email from you a special occasion. Use your email list sparingly in order to make it more effective.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Is email marketing effective?

Exclusive versus inclusive

644 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, ad, email, social_media, email_marketing, author_advice
0

When's the last time you sent a handwritten thank-you note in the mail? When's the last time you received one? If you've sent or received even one within the past year, you're probably in the minority. So think about what a positive impression you can make by sending one when appropriate. Everyone likes to feel appreciated!


Here are some examples of where a physical thank-you note could (not will—no guarantees in book promotion!) make a difference in your marketing efforts:


  • A reviewer who has a mountain of books in her to-be-read (TBR) pile. A thank-you note for "taking the time to read my book" might bump your title to the top of that stack. (Note: be sure to sign the book too.)
  • The editor of an alumni publication that mentioned your book. Your thank-you note might open the door to other opportunities for coverage down the road, e.g. a profile, or an invitation to participate in a regional alumni event.
  • The organizer of a book club that has selected your book. People who run book clubs are usually voracious readers who love to talk about books - and about the time they got a real thank-you note from an author. The more people who talk about you and your book, the better.
  • The organizer of a book club that hasn't selected your book because there are too many books currently in front of yours. A personalized "thanks for considering my book" note might increase your chances of being the book club's selected read down the road.


Ask a hundred authors if there's a magic formula for selling books, and you'll probably get close to a hundred NO answers. But ask a hundred people if they like receiving thank-you notes in the mail, and I bet you'll get close to a hundred YES answers. So what do you have to lose? It certainly can't hurt, and, as a bonus, it feels pretty good to do something nice for someone else.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Use a personal touch when reaching out or following up

The power of a personal connection

686 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, thank-you_notes
1

Beyond the book

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 25, 2017

In order to sell lots of books, you may have to release versions of your novel that go beyond the physical book. Here are three other media platforms that may help you build your community and sell more books.

 

1. Audiobook: In another time, they were called books on tape, and then CDs became the preferred format. When we started consuming digital audio files, audiobooks were born. An audiobook version of your novel is a natural transition. I have taken the leap, and I have to tell you I had a blast working on them. From selecting a narrator to uploading the files, developing an audiobook is a truly exhilarating process. The fact it can grow your readership (listenership) is a delightful bonus.

 

2. The stage: I know it sounds like a stretch, but a stage version of your book has the potential to grow your audience. Granted, that audience will be limited to the people in the theater, but social media gives them their own platform to tell their friends and followers about the adaptation of your book to a play. I attended a play in California where the playwright sold and signed copies of her book after the performance of her play based on the book. By the looks of it, she did very well.

 

3. Podcast: This is kind of a mixture of an audiobook and a stage play. The podcast version of your book mimics radio theater. Like a stage play, you would use actors to act out the parts. Unlike a stage play, you would serialize the material and present each segment via a podcasting service on the same day and at the same time. The hope is that you will build buzz as folks wait in anticipation for your next chapter.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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What makes you different?

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

1,301 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: books, marketing, selling, promotion, podcast, audiobooks, platform
0

Word-of-mouth is a powerful force, and there's nothing wrong with encouraging your fans to tell their friends about your book. The key word here is fans. It's clear that a person is a fan of your book if she writes a favorable review on her blog, if he sends you an email telling you he enjoyed it, if she signs up for your newsletter, etc. In those situations, ask away!


What I don't recommend is asking people who are not fans to act like they are. I recently received an email from a self-published author, whom I hadn't met, asking me to forward a one-page description of his novel, which I hadn't read, to my network of contacts. The "description" he included was essentially a glowing review of his book. It was also written in the first person. That meant that if I did send it to anyone, it would appear that I'd written it.


What would you have done in that situation? I imagine the same thing I did, which was to thank the author for getting in touch and to tell him I couldn't promote a book I hadn't read. I felt bad for him because he had clearly put a lot of effort into his outreach. His email to me was personalized, which got me to read it - good! If he'd only added in the additional step of offering to send me a copy so I could read it before possibly recommending it, who knows what might have happened. I'm always looking for a good read.


If right now you're thinking, "I don't know if I have any fans to ask for help," you can start by including a note in your email signature along the lines of, Did you enjoy my book? Please tell your friends! If it results in a recommendation, it will be an honest one.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing tip: make it easy for readers to contact you

Marketing idea: encourage your fans to spread the word

749 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, author, promotions, word_of_mouth
2

 

Here are three building blocks of a good marketing campaign, with resources for each:


1)   Website



Andiamo Creative: www.andiamocreative.com

Author Support: www.authorsupport.com


Note: Andiamo Creative recently revamped my website if you'd like to have a look: www.mariamurnane.com.


If you're good with design tools and/or your budget is tight, free services such as Wix, Website Builder, and GoDaddy are options. (Just be careful not to end up with a site loaded with advertising, which can look gauche and turn off potential readers.)


2)   Newsletter

I recommend using a newsletter program over email for multiple reasons, such as the option for subscribers to opt in (or out), and your ability to track subscriber engagement. Two solid vendors are:


Mailchimp: www.mailchimp.com

Constant Contact: www.constantcontact.com


I use Mailchimp, which is free for unlimited messages to less than 2500 subscribers, and $30+ per month on a sliding scale of subscribers from there. (Click here to see what a recent newsletter looks like.)


3)   Business cards, postcards, bookmarks, etc.

Easy-to-carry giveaways with information about your book are a great marketing tool, and the following vendors offer fantastic pricing:


Vista Print: www.vistaprint.com

Got Print: www.gotprint.com


I recently ordered 250 customized, two-sided, color business cards from Vista Print for $22.99. (I believe there are also more basic card options for free.) Each of my cards includes my website color, logo and tagline: Bestselling novels about life, love and friendship.


Book marketing is hard work and takes a lot of energy, which can leave authors of every genre feeling overwhelmed and discouraged. While there's no magic formula for conducting a marketing campaign, the basic elements above will get you started, and in my opinion that's half the battle.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing Tip: Business Cards

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

1,482 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, websites, promotions, newsletters, email_campaigns
4

Auditing your readers

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 27, 2017

 

Businesses, big and small, do frequent audits to gauge their success. They inventory product. They perform extensive ROI (return on investment) on advertising and marketing campaigns. They research and evaluate the demographics of their customer base. They evaluate the effectiveness of their workforce. They look at everything from the amount of money they spend on staples to the salaries of executive officers, all in the interest of maximizing their productivity.


You are an indie author, which means you are technically a small business owner. You should be auditing your business just like the major corporations. You won't know how to grow unless you know where you stand.


Start with your readers. You might be asking how you can possibly audit your readers. How can you possibly know who your readers are? Because you know your genre. Genres are demographic-specific by design. By-in-large, they attract a common core of readers who are from the same age group and in a lot of cases, the same gender. Depending on your genre, you can even narrow down even further. Find out as much information on the demographic that represents the typical reader of your genre. A simple query with your favorite search engine should get you started. Dive deep. Know their likes, their dislikes, and where they are most likely to share their likes and dislikes with others in their demographics. Know them like you know members of your own family.


Auditing your readers is the best way to build effective marketing campaigns and give you confidence that you are spending your branding time wisely.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in?

 

Create a reader profile

 

Categories, genres, and subgenres

 

 

 

 

1,431 Views 4 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, self-publishing, readers, writing, genre, social_media
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