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488 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
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Yes, bad reviews can be soul-crushing. They can make you question your abilities as a writer. They can leave you feeling hurt and depressed. You shouldn't let them have that much power over you because it literally is only an opinion. It isn't a formula devised by the reviewer that proves your book is bad. There is no concrete evidence in a review that proves you can't write. It's a collection of words that paints a subjective view of your book.


I've attended many public readings of works in progress, and you wouldn't believe the stark differences of opinion from those in attendance. Some were blown away by the reading, and others didn't get it. The same material was judged completely differently by two, three, sometimes by a half dozen people. Reviewers would get in heated arguments about their diverging opinions. Here's the thing, neither side, for or against, could provide absolute proof that their opinion wasn't just opinion but bona fide fact. It just wasn't possible to prove.


When you read a bad review of your book, keep this in mind: it's not a statement of fact. Accept it for what it is, a skewed view based on the reviewer's taste. I can&'t stand the movie The English Patient. A lot of people loved it. In fact, it won a truckload of awards. My opinion of the movie is based on my own personal taste. It doesn't mean I'm right. It just means it's not for me.


Don?t let bad reviews ruin your day. They're nothing more than opinions.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Bad Reviews & Great Company

Get Reviews for Your Indie Book

670 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, reviews, review, writing, book_reviews, branding
0

 

I'm not going to lie. It is hard living a life, writing a book, and building an author brand all at once. It takes almost superhuman abilities to pull off every part of being an author today without falling short somewhere along the way. Stuff happens, and suddenly you find yourself having to choose which area of your authorhood matters most to you. Invariably, the writing will always win, as it should.

 

 

Here's the fix for that. Keep this one fact in mind, and you will find the resources to do everything you need to do to build your author brand and sell books. OK, be prepared to have your mind blown. You are not alone, and there is one aspect of your brand-building strategy that is tailor-made for incorporating the kindness of friends. That is the world of blogging. You are essentially the editor-in-chief of your blog. Your network of friends in the arts community is your staff of writers. Give them space on your blog to discuss whatever they feel passionate about.

 

 

You are giving them a platform, and they are giving you content that will attract visitors. It is a mutually beneficial arrangement. Right now, you probably aren't in the position to pay them, but your future goal should probably move in that direction. That way you can have more editorial control over what they write. For now, you don't have that luxury. That's why you're going to want to choose very carefully to whom you give space on your blog. Make sure that they don't stray too far from your brand identity.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Your secret weapon

 

How to help the author in your life

 

 

1,059 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, blogging, outreach, brand_identity, marketing_platform, social_meida
0

 

Recently an old high school friend asked if I would speak to his brother, Scott, who had written a novel and wasn't sure what path to publication he should pursue. I agreed and had a brief email chat with Scott to set up a time to meet for coffee when I was in town to visit my parents later that month.


Scott had a link to his website in the signature of his email (smart!), so I clicked on it to have a quick look. Not knowing what to expect, I was pleasantly surprised by what I found: good writing. The site was just one page and sparse on copy, but what was there was crisp, engaging, and funny. It wasn't a sample from Scott's book, but it was a sample of Scott's writing, and Scott's writing made me want to read Scott's book. See how that works?


I told Scott as much when we met in person, and he was surprised. He hadn't thought of his website copy as a "writing sample." He didn't even think of himself as a real writer because his book hadn't been published. But he is a writer. He wrote a novel, and he should be proud of that, no matter what happens next.


In previous blogs I've recommended putting the first chapter of your book(s) on your website, and I still do. Much like in an ice cream store, offering potential customers a free taste increases the chances they will want more--assuming they like it. But in addition to the first chapter, I encourage you authors out there to think of all the words you put out into the world--be it via your blog or your bio page or your Twitter posts--as writing samples, as chances to capture the interest of potential readers. Getting someone's attention is hard, so why not use all the tools available to you?


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

 

 

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Marketing tip: put your first chapter on your website

 

Marketing tip: tap your network for contacts

 


 

1,370 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, website, help, publishing, writing, social_media, marketing_adivce
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New technologies have brought us a lot of great innovations in recent years. Consumer-grade cameras have such powerful zoom lenses that you can now capture video or take pictures of individual craters on the moon. In some cases, surgeons don''t even have to be in the same room as a patient to perform surgery. They skillfully guide robot arms equipped with surgical tools to perform delicate operations from miles away. And don't get me started on driverless cars. I can't wait for the day when I can nap while I drive to see family and friends 800 miles away.


The most useful new technology for authors trying to build a brand today is livestreaming video. A number of social media sites have integrated the ability for you to post video as you're shooting it. More than a few of my author, actor, and entertainer friends have used the technology to post quick thoughts on world events, online challenges issued by their followers, readings from their latest works in progress, etc.


Live video is an awesome way to reach your readers and build brand recognition. Chances are you're not yet acclimated to performing live on camera, so my advice is to practice what you're going to say before you step in front of the camera. You don't have to memorize lines, but you do want to make sure you have a clear idea on how to present your thoughts coherently. Practicing with the camera off will boost your confidence, and you'll be ready to present your brand in the most positive light.


Don't be afraid to give it a try just because you haven't done it before. Experiment with it. If it's something you don't enjoy doing, don't do it.


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Stay on the Cutting Edge of Technology

Be Authentic to Build Your Brand



891 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, indie, video, branding, social_media, live_stream
1

No one wants their authors to be all business. If you take to your virtual space and constantly post about your books or about the world of publishing as a whole, you are going to chase potential readers away.


Your author brand has to be multidimensional. I know it sounds counterintuitive, but you can&'t focus all your energy on your role as an author when branding yourself as an author. You are a commodity. It sounds simplistic, but it&'s true. There are millions of books available to buy. What sets your book immediately apart is you, the author. Yes, the issue of style and the quality of your writing and storytelling are crucial, but there is no denying that the author is often the draw.


So, as you build your platform, plan on devoting a good chunk of your online time to discussing and participating in topics outside of your books. Reviewing books in your genre, discussing hobbies, sharing stories about your passion projects outside of writing, these are all things you can focus on. You can even go totally astray and publish fluff pieces about your pets, family, friends, etc. Your options are unlimited.


The point is that you are more than an author. You are a human being who dabbles in real life as much as any respectable human being. The more adventurous you are, the greater the material you'll have at your disposal. So, get out there and jump at the opportunity to do something interesting, if for no other reason than it will beef up your author brand.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Building an Author Brand: You are What You Share

An Active Author Brand



929 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, writing, social_media, brand_identity, author_platform
1

Content marketing

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 1, 2017

You may have heard the term "content marketing" before. You may have even used it. It's become a ubiquitous term that is used in countless posts and articles about branding. But, what does it really mean?

 

Simply put, it's branding oneself not by calling attention to one's brand, but by being a purveyor of useful, entertaining, and/or informative content via social media, blog, or online media outlets. In essence, you are providing a valuable service. That you are an author with a book or many books for sale isn't the main focus of the content you provide.

 

Obviously, you want to gear your content marketing to attracting those readers who represent the demographics for your books. For instance, if you write science fiction, you might write a content marketing piece on the history of science fiction. Or, if you write "how-to"books on gardening, you might write an informative piece on seasonal gardening tactics. Even if you write works that are heavily laced with humor, you could write your views on today's current events, featuring your brand of wit and witticisms, of course.

 

Don't overthink the term. Content marketing is just you writing about stuff you enjoy. That's all it really is. Yes, you want it to be well researched. And yes, you should strive for the piece to be well written and painstakingly edited. Other than that, have fun. Build your brand around being a pathway to knowledge and entertainment. Once people learn to rely on your content, they will seek out your books.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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3 reasons original content is king

What is article marketing?

4,457 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, promotion, content, branding, social_media
0

Weird fringe

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 25, 2017

So, you've written a book that is a little...different. It essentially defies category and genre, and, as a result, it's a bit of a hard sell. What demographic fits your typical reader? Where do you find this demographic? How do you engage them?


    It's a problem, but it does have a solution. You just have to get as creative in your marketing approach as you were in your writing. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

 

  1. Fringe festivals: I would say if you've written a book like I described above, the word "fringe" fits you perfectly. In all honesty, I find the word to be one of the coolest in the English language, and I'm not alone. There are festivals out there that cater to the concept of fringe. Most of them are devoted to material written for the performing arts, but that doesn't preclude you from participating. There might be room for you at one or many of these festivals. They may have a vendor area where you can set up a table and sign books. They may even have spoken word performances where an actor can read excerpts from your book.
  2. Conventions for the unusual: The second best word in the English language is the word "weird." Everyone should be a little weird every now and then. For those folks who have slightly wonky hobbies or professions, there's a convention for that. And who knows? You might fit in perfectly.

 

All you have to do is search online for conventions or festivals that match the theme of your book, and my guess is you will get more than a few hits that will work perfectly for your material. Contact the organizers and embrace the weird fringe.

 

 

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Write a Genre-Bending Novel

 

Repeat, Repeat, Repeat

 

 

 

 

971 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, category, genre, personal_appearance, demographic, author_appearance
0

For the record

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 18, 2017

Do you have all the tools of the author's trade? Sure, you have an endless stream of creative energy to get you from the opening line to the last page. And, you have your writing instruments: pen, paper, computer, etc. You have a social media presence that helps boost your author brand. You participate in public readings and author events. You have a professional grade video camera and/or DSLR camera...Wait, maybe you don't have the last item on the list. If you don't, my advice is to invest in one.

 


 

Photos and video are highly effective ways to build your brand. Record your journey with images, and people are more likely to tag along with you. I'm not suggesting you replace written journal entries, tweets, or status updates with photos and video. These images will simply supplement your written posts.


Image quality matters, so don't skimp on resolution. In today's world, high-end smartphones can deliver beautiful pictures and video. Personally, I'm a DSLR man. There's something about the heft of a camera with an interchangeable lens that makes me feel more confident with the final product.


You'll want to move beyond the selfie. Certainly don't bypass the selfie, but don't make it your only means of branding. If you're doing a reading, making a presentation, or contributing on a panel, bring a family member, friend, or assistant to record the event.


At the end of every year, do a compilation video that incorporates all the images you collected from event to event. Do it to help build your brand. Do it so your author journey has a visual record.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Picture This

 

The Marketing Tool Many Authors Neglect

 


 


1,246 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, video, author_brand, marketing_plan, author_platform
1

Recently I received an email from an indie author asking a question about securing reviews from bloggers. Then, in the same email, the author sent me a link to his book's Amazon page and told me I was more than welcome to read it. And review it.


I didn't read his book, but I'll tell you what I did read--his email, with my mouth agape.


For one, I don't review books, which I've said many times in this space. But, if I were a book reviewer, it would take more than a link to get me on board. Book reviewers are well aware that they can buy and review any book in the world. So if you want them to review yours, offer to send a copy.


When I was self-published, I spent countless hours contacting book reviewers asking them to review my novel, Perfect on Paper. I also spent countless hours at the post office sending out review copies. It was an investment of both time and money, but I did it because I wanted people to review my book, and I knew they weren't going to do that if all I did was send them a link to Amazon.


Here's the thing: Book reviewers and bloggers expect you to send them a book. These people are voracious readers, and while they might not come out and say it, many of them review books just to get free copies and save money. You can always offer to send an electronic version, but in my experience reviewers are purists and prefer to read print books.


A good rule of thumb for book marketing of any kind is to put yourself in the recipient's shoes. How would you feel if someone asked you to review their homemade cookies but expected you to buy a dozen first?


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Why you should give away (some) books for free

Get reviews for your indie book

1,590 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, writing, promotions, book_reviews
2

 

I have advocated for indie authors supporting indie authors many times before on this blog. The general idea is to reserve a day of the week to promote the work of a fellow indie author. The question is what day of the week works best for this type of activity.


The vehicle to promote an indie author is clear. You will be using social media. Which social media outlet is up to you. There are a lot to choose from, and many of you probably use several social media sites to make connections with readers.


There is data out there that lets you know when the most active times are for all the social media sites. Because there are so many of them and because some of them service very specific demographics, it's hard to find a consistent day of the week and time of day that will be best to promote your selection for indie author of the week. Rather than try to force a square peg into a round hole by finding a time that caters to all of them, here are the best times to post to get the most views for some of the more popular social media sites. Choose the one that best fits your social media strategy.


  • Facebook: Saturdays and Sundays at 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.
  • Twitter: Wednesdays at noon and between 5:00-6:00 p.m.
  • Instagram: Mondays and Thursday are the best days of the week, and the best time is between 8:00-9:00 p.m. Specifically, folks say to avoid posting between 3:00-4:00 p.m.
  • LinkedIn: Tuesday through Thursday from 7:00-8:00 a.m., at noon, and from 5:00-6:00 p.m.


Remember: creating buzz for other indie authors can build credibility for all indie authors. Get out there and share the indie author love.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Supporting Indie Authors

Living the Indie Author Dream

896 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, social_media
0

I'm on the distribution lists of many indie authors who occasionally send out promotional emails about their books. Marketing is a lot of work, so I respect the efforts of these individuals to boost their sales. Unfortunately, however, many of the emails I receive are peppered with errors, and that doesn't instill much faith that the books being promoted are going to be good. The books might in fact be excellent, but if people don't want to read them because of errors in the marketing emails, that shows the power of a negative impression.

 

We all make mistakes, which is why it's important to proofread your messages several times before sending them out. My brain plays tricks on me when I write, especially after I've been cutting and pasting and moving things around. Sometimes I simply don't see mistakes because my brain sees what it thinks should be there. To help counter that, I have my mom read my newsletters before I send them out. If you don't have someone like that to help you, try reading your content out loud to catch errors.

 

If you were promoting yourself as a dentist or a mechanic, errors wouldn't be so detrimental. But, you're a writer, and you're promoting your writing! So think of your messages as a way to showcase your talent, to give the recipients a taste of what you can do. If your content is engaging, well written, and free of errors, it is more likely to encourage potential readers to pick up a copy of your book.

 

Note: I prefer to use a newsletter program instead of email. Mailchimp is free if you have fewer than 2,500 subscribers, and it's easy to use. If your distribution list is smaller still, bulk emails can also work fine. Just be sure to use the blind copy feature for the recipients.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

 

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Watch for Errors in Marketing Materials

Book Marketing Is a Numbers Game

570 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, marketing, self-publishing, writing, promotions, writing_tips, grammar_advice
0

Book events aren't the draw they used to be. There is too much in the way of entertainment out there: movies, concerts, musicals, plays, comedy shows, etc. You have a lot of competition. The best way to generate interest for your book event is to spice things up a little. Here are three ideas to make your next book event an actual event.


  1. Treats: Doing a book signing? Would you like people to stop by your table? Put out a bowl or tray of treats: candy, brownies, chips, etc. If it's sweet and/or savory, it will draw people to your table. People rarely grab a free treat and run. Once they're standing in front of you, they are more than likely going to inquire about your book. Make your pitch. Snag a reader.
  2. Entertainment: Have you scheduled a public reading? Do you play a musical instrument or do you know someone who does? Why not come up with a set list for the reading? A little acoustic guitar or even a small jazz ensemble could be a great draw and turn a reading into a bona fide event.
  3. Actors: Got some killer dialogue? Then don't do a reading. Do a series of short plays featuring your best dialogue. You will find actors in practically every community across this country of ours. They are eager to perform. Make a connection at a local theater, and you can combine a fundraiser for them with a night of short one-acts featuring themes and characters from your book.


The key is to make your "event" as eventful and inviting as possible. Do whatever your budget will allow to build excitement for your next book event.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Participation required

 

Do you need swag?

468 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, promotion, writing, book_events
1

    Mobile apps are all the rage, and as screens continue to grow smaller, and cellular streaming grows to deliver more and more data, I think it's safe to assume they won't fall out of vogue anytime soon. The question is, can an author utilize a mobile app to create buzz about a book? As of this writing, mobile app development can be costly, so if it's an avenue you want to pursue, consider your options carefully. Not every genre is a mobile app fit. Here are three I think make sense:

 

  1. Science fiction and fantasy novels: These types of novels are natural fits for mobile apps. First, the demographics skew younger than other genres. Young people live on their phones. Their heads are down and locked on their screens. Secondly, the nature of the genre lends itself to expand beyond the pages of the book. A space odyssey has a universe of possibilities that make for perfect content on mobile apps. Fantasy novels are based on mythologies that can be explored via mobile apps. Characters can be turned into emojis. There is so much you can do with a mobile app to engage your readers.
  2. Historical Fiction: On the other side of the demographic spectrum, historical fiction could be a great fit for a mobile app. Let's say you do a novel about Charleston during the Civil War. You could create a travel app that coincides with the historical sites mentioned in your book. You can give facts about the site and how you incorporated those facts into your story.
  3. Romance novels: These have potential in the mobile app world, too. Readers can send sweet nothings via text using a mobile app designed after your romance novel--a romantic line, a flirtatious emoji that looks like your protagonist and his or her love interest. The possibilities are endless.

 

There are undoubtedly more than the three genres I included here. I'm curious to know how you would utilize a mobile app for your own book. How would you harness the power of a mobile app to create buzz about your book?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Mobile marketing for authors

Don't say it unless you meme it

1,362 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, book_marketing, genre, social, social_media, social_media_tips
0

Do you have a mailing list of readers who enjoyed your writing? If so, good for you! Whether it's through a newsletter program or email, reaching out to your fans is a good way to keep a connection with them. The question is, what do you tell them?


In my semi-regular newsletter I include one piece of "news." Here are some examples:


  • Photos of my events such as book signings, book clubs, speeches or panel discussions
  • News about upcoming translations of my books
  • News about sales milestones
  • Promotions for signed copies (this is good to do around the holidays for gift ideas)
  • Photos of fans holding up my books at home or at stores (they send them to me sometimes!)
  • News about distribution agreements, e.g., in certain bookstores or wholesale clubs
  • Awards my books have won


In each newsletter I also include links to my recent blog posts as well as a note about my consulting services. I also encourage my fans to tell their friends about my books, so I can afford to keep writing them.


While I like to keep my newsletters strictly about my professional life, some author friends of mine have chosen a more personal route. One recently sent out a message about her engagement, while another tackled her feelings about the presidential election. Yet another addressed with humility how hard it was proving to be to get people to buy her book.


There's no magic formula for any of this, and every author's pot of potential "material" is different. So play around with it and see what works best for you. And if/when you begin working on a new book, include your fans in the process! I once had my fans vote on two cover options for a book, and it worked out so well that I'm considering asking them to vote on the title of my next one.


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Make it easy for readers to find you

The power of a personal connection

1,094 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, marketing, writing, promotions, newsletters
0

Keep it simple

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 14, 2016

 

    When you sit down to outline your marketing strategy, there is one thing above all others that you want to keep in mind. Keep it simple. Don't feel like you have to reinvent the wheel. The tried and true work; otherwise, they wouldn't be tried and true. Here are three reasons why keeping your marketing strategy simple makes for more effective results:


  1. Keeping things simple offers the least number of obstacles. If you try to overthink it and come up with something never seen before, you are creating impediments that will likely frustrate you and could lead you to not follow through. Study what others have done before you and repeat.
  2. Overcomplicated planning usually makes for overcomplicated outcomes. Being creative with your marketing strategy isn't bad, but being too creative can confuse the readers you are trying to reach.
  3. Keeping things simple most likely means you are incorporating strategies that have been tested before, which means you most likely have data to justify your strategy. It worked before. It will most likely work again. The hard work has been done for you. Most of the obstacles we discussed earlier aren't there. You can just plug in your book and go.


Of course, keeping things simple with your marketing strategy doesn't mean it will be easy. You are still going to have to do your research and determine what will work for you, but the good news is that the research is usually just a search engine away. Good luck, and keep it simple.

 

 

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Exclusive versus inclusive

 

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

 

 

 

 

1,535 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, writing, author_tips, writing_tip
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