Skip navigation
1 2 3 4 ... 30 Previous Next

Resources

439 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
2

The word "said" is the most common dialogue identifier. That is to say, authors use it to break up a conversation and apply a character name or the appropriate pronoun to help the reader keep track of who is saying what at any given time. It can be overused. It can be underused. The trick is finding the right balance.

 

"Said" is declarative. Technically. In the strictest sense. But to an artist, strict is not always applicable. With that in mind, I've had a debate on a number of occasions about the use of the word "said" beyond its declarative nature.

 

By declarative, I mean "said" is usually applied thusly in a novel:

 

"Mike is coming over this morning," I said.

 

The declaration is that Mike is coming over this morning. Simple. So, how do we use "said" in a non-declarative sense? We use it when a character says something in the form of a question--but in a situation when it's not necessarily a question. Primarily, it can be used to convey disbelief, as in this example:

 

We all saw her enter the room, but I was the only one who saw her destiny. The entire rest of her life flashed before my eyes, and I couldn't stop grinning. Without thinking, I said, "I'm going to marry that girl."

 

"You?" Brian said. "You can't even talk to girls."

 

Not my best writing, but quality aside, to use the word "asked" as the identifier for Brian seems inappropriate to me because he's not really asking a question. He's making a statement of disbelief. His friend just said something that completely goes against his character. In essence, Brian is declaring his skepticism.

 

So, what say you, fellow writers? Can you say a question when it's not really a question but a statement of disbelief? Is "said" the appropriate identifier in this case?

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

Does Grammar Matter?

"Not adverbs," He Said Angrily.

1,038 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, dialogue_identifier, declarative
3

I am going to make a claim that will undoubtedly make a lot of folks groan and roll their eyes. I speak from personal observation, and I'm willing to concede that my conclusion is not universal in nature. In other words, I may just be really weird.

 

Like many of you, I get marketing emails all the time. They come from all sorts of organizations and individuals. I ignore 99 percent of them. I've been conditioned to do so. The one percent I don't ignore come from an e-tailer that sends me about three to four emails a day. I see their name under the "From" column over and over again. The name of the company takes a subliminal hold in my subconscious. Even if I don't actively follow the links in the emails they provide, they are definitely my go-to resource for online shopping.

 

On the flip side, I am on a couple of email lists for authors. I get emails from them at most once a month. Given the volume of marketing emails I get, these messages from authors announcing a new book or some other development go unnoticed. Beyond missing the content of the email, the subliminal effect of seeing the sender's name on a continuous stream of emails is also absent.

 

My point is that email marketing works, but not if you use it infrequently. In a supposition that admittedly defies what we've been taught, I believe email marketing works when it floods into your inbox. Some call it spam. Some call it junk mail, but it works on the premise that has served the advertising industry well for as long as there has been an advertising industry. Repetition is the key to creating top-of-mind awareness and increasing sales.

 

You may agree or disagree, and I'm not advocating using such a strategy, but I am curious to know how you use or view email marketing.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

A Marketing Calendar

Competency

1,190 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, selling, self-publishing, promotion, social_media, email_marketing
1

It's that time of year again: the beginning! Why not start yours and join me in making the following resolution?

 

In 2016 I will do (at least) one thing every day to promote my book(s).

 

I know that marketing is a foreign language to many authors, and even those who are familiar with it don't usually enjoy it. But if you want people who aren't your friends and family to buy your book, it's something you simply have to do.

 

If right now you're saying to yourself, Okay I'm on board with the resolution, but what specifically should I do?, here are some suggestions--some broad and some granular--that should get you going:

 

  • Create or update your Amazon author page
  • Craft or update a short, compelling bio
  • Create or update a snappy description of your book
  • Check all of the above for grammatical errors
  • Update your headshot
  • Create a website
  • Create a Goodreads profile
  • Insert a hyperlink to your Amazon page or website in your email signature
  • Send a signed book to your college alumni magazine
  • Research local alumni chapters of your alma mater and reach out to them--many have monthly newsletters
  • Research book clubs near you--then offer to attend the meeting if they choose your book
  • Put a few copies of your book in the trunk of your car--you never know when you'll need them

 

Asking "How do I market a book?" is kind of like asking "How long is a ball of string?" You get out what you put in, but over time hard work and persistence can (and do) pay off. You just have to keep at it and try to keep a positive attitude. Remember, you wrote a book! That's an incredible accomplishment in and of itself. Happy New Year!

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

 

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

Marketing Tip: Make It Easy for Your Readers to Contact You

Marketing Tip: Show vs. Tell in Your Book Description

2,149 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions, marketing_resolution
3

So, this isn't the first time I've floated this idea out there, but it's something I like to touch on from time to time to remind indie authors what an author brand really is. Using the word brand suggests that there's an artificial construct involved. That you as an author are being directed to create a persona that you think meets readers' expectations.

 

Every time I get into this discussion with people I'm reminded of a scene from the classic television show Seinfeld. When Jerry and George are pitching a show to the television network executives, they're asked what it's about, and George excitedly proclaims that it&'s about nothing. The network executive is confused because it can't be about nothing. It has to be about something, but George insists that it's not. Jerry interjects that even nothing is something.

 

That exchange encapsulates what an author brand is. It's nothing. That is to say it's nothing false. It is you. It is your interests, your opinions, and your personality. It is everything you love. It can even be everything that drives you crazy. Wherever your passions lie, that's your brand. There is nothing to do to build a brand other than to be yourself, genuinely, fervently, and openly.

 

Building and maintaining an author brand is, at its core, you being honest about who you really are. If you are, your brand will thrive and help grow your community. It won't happen overnight, but it will happen as long as you stay committed to that principle. In turn, your community will help grow your readership.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

Evaluating Your Author Brand

Building an Author Brand is Easy

5,640 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, branding, author_brand, marketing_ideas, author_tips, author_advice
0

I have a book that will be released in July of 2016, and it's a bit of a different experience for me than my previous publishing adventures because I have no immediate plans to release it in print. Long story short, this is a team project, and I don't have the final say on the format. Hopefully, I can expand it into print, but for now, I have to think strictly eBook.

 

That is a bit of a mind shift for me. For a number of years, I have been doing releases in both eBook and print formats. The print copies have always been an easy marketing tool for me. I could take a number of copies with me to appearances or events and devise giveaways to boost enthusiasm for a new release. Online marketing is great, but the personal appearance is still king when it comes to connecting with readers.

 

I have committed to doing a book launch for this new eBook release that involves a personal appearance, and it has presented me with a bit of a puzzle. How do I get people excited at an appearance when I won't have a book to appear with?

 

At a recent workshop for playwrights, as I watched staged readings of other writers' work, it hit me. I don't need the book. I just need the story. I went home and hammered out a plan for an appearance that involves short dramatic readings of chapters using local actors. I will involve other writers I know to adapt and direct the material for these staged readings. I'll incorporate door prizes that fit the theme of the book for the audience. I'll make it an invitation-only intimate affair with a number of nonprofessional social media savvy friends in attendance. I have to say it is the first of my appearances that will be more about the people attending and performing than it will be about me, and I'm so excited by that. They will take ownership of my story, and the marketing of the eBook. My hope is that it will translate into a frontloaded wave of word-of-mouth buzz that will grow over time.

 

Don't ditch the personal appearance if you're planning an eBook-only release. Find a way to get attendees at the event engaged and enthusiastic, so they will spread the word via their social media platforms.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

How to Make a Personal Appearance a Success

How to Make an Author Event Eventful

1,515 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, book, print, kindle, ebook, craft, online_marketing, book_launch, book_launch_party
2

Author-signed books make great gifts. Your biggest fans, however, might not have any idea that they can buy them from you, so why not tell them? You can do this via email, Twitter, Facebook, your newsletter, etc. How much you charge per copy is up to you, and you can even offer to wrap the books yourself and mail them directly to the recipient of the gift.

 

With the holidays just around the corner, I decided to email a couple of friends who are also fans of my books to see if they wanted to buy any signed copies as gifts for their friends. Within an hour both replied with orders for a total of 10 signed books--or $200 payable to me.

 

I think I'm on to something.

 

Today I plan to look through my contacts list and reach out to other friends who are also big fans of my books. I'm not talking about a mass email to everyone I know--I mean personalized, tasteful messages that are more than just sales pitches. Yes, that's time consuming, but book marketing is time consuming. There's simply no way around that.

 

As for physically mailing the books, I strongly suggest going to the post office and asking for the book rate. It's much cheaper than regular shipping, and it includes tracking! I often receive emails from readers of my blog asking if they can send me copies of their work--and if I say yes, the book usually arrives via FedEx or some equally expensive method. Each time that happens I feel bad because that's a double expense for the sender (the book itself and the big shipping fee). The only downside about the book rate is that you can't request it at the self-serve kiosks, so you have to wait in line, but the money you'll save over time is well worth it.

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

 

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

Hold a Holiday Contest

Two Easy Ways to Save Money in Your Book Promotion

882 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, author, writing, promotions, signed-copies
0

I recently received an email from an author named S.J. (That is a purposefully androgynous pen name.) S.J. was doing a blog tour to help promote the launch of his/her first novel and wanted to know if I would consider letting him/her do a guest post on my personal website.

 

I'd never had anyone do a guest post, but S.J. mentioned that he/she had read all my books, so I wanted to help. Why wouldn't I? S.J. had supported me, so I wanted to support S.J. in return. (S.J. is also a loyal reader of my blog and even mentioned his/her favorite post in the message.)

 

S.J. had been writing professionally for many years but was a first-time novelist, so I thought my readers would appreciate some thoughts on what he/she had learned from the process. Here's the post on my website.

 

The same week I received an email from another debut author, whom I won't name. He asked me if I wanted to interview him on my website. I asked him if he'd read any of my books, and he said no. Then I asked him if he'd ever read my blog, and he admitted that no, he hadn't. I never heard from him after that.

 

Do you see the difference a personal touch can make? S.J. took the time to personalize his/her outreach to me, and it resulted in a guest post on my blog. The other author used a copy/paste/generic approach, and it resulted in nothing. If he had opened his message with "Hey, I haven't read any of your books, but I just ordered a couple for my sister..." our interaction would have been very different. Keep that in mind that next time you reach out to a fellow author for help!

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

 

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

The Power of a Personal Connection

Use a Personal Touch When Reaching Out or Following Up

850 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, author, writing, promotions, personal_touch
1

There are few things I enjoy more than getting fan "mail"--in whatever form it arrives. This morning I received a wonderful tweet from a woman named Yasminda that made me smile. I replied with my email address and asked her to send me a note. When she did, I checked her address in my database and saw that she wasn't subscribed to my newsletter. I also realized she wasn't a fan of my Facebook page or my Goodreads page. I asked her if she was aware I had those things. She said she was not aware but that she was happy to sign up, like the pages, etc.

 

This was a good lesson for me because I'd always kind of assumed that the fans I have on Twitter are the same fans I have on Facebook, etc. And while I imagine there is a significant amount of overlap, it's not comprehensive. Case in point: If I didn't have a Twitter profile, I might never have heard from Yasminda.

 

In our email conversation I told Yasminda how much I would appreciate her help in spreading the word about my books, and she jumped to action! Within minutes she posted a nice note about my books on Facebook (with a link to my fan page), and she also ordered signed copies from me as a gift to her mother. How cool is that?

 

There's no magic formula for connecting with your readers, but having a presence in more than one place will make it easier for fans to contact you. If all you have is a website, make sure the contact tab is easy to find. When it comes to book sales there's nothing more powerful than word of mouth, so the more you can do to interact directly with your biggest fans, the better!

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

 

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

Ramping Up Facebook Activity for the New Year

Your Fans are Your Brand

2,927 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, promotions, fan_interaction
3

When you try to please everyone, you please no one. Art thrives on honesty. Why? Because honesty allows for conviction, and conviction leads to pouring your heart and soul out onto the page. If you write to please the broadest number of people possible, you are most likely holding back when holding back is the last thing you should be doing. Holding back causes your writing to become thin and bland.

 

The temptation is to reach the largest number of people. Simple math suggests that if you've written something that has the potential to appeal to an enormous group of people, you're going to sell a lot of books. Logical, right? Unfortunately, logic has little to do with publishing. Publishing is an industry built on passion. People are passionate about the books they read and even more passionate about the books they recommend.

 

Narrow your focus. Stop trying to reach a broad audience. I know it sounds antithetical to creating a huge seller, but niche markets can be very profitable. For one thing, they allow you to more easily identify your audience. You'll know your demographic, where to find them, and how to communicate with them. That makes for a very effective marketing campaign. Another benefit is that members of these niche markets usually know one another. They either form groups or join online communities where they can share news and notes on their common interests. Your book can find fertile ground for viral sharing among these folks.

 

Stop trying to please everyone. Write a book that ignites your passion, and reap the rewards for reaching a niche market.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

What Makes a Book Readable?

It's Not Just a Hobby, It's a Marketing Opportunity

1,423 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, promotion, sales, seilling_books, marketing_campaign
5

Looking for a way to boost lagging sales? There's no magic bullet, but here are three strategies that may be the perfect solution for you.

 

  1. Cover Design: You've got a solid, compelling story. It's been edited by a professional or someone you know and trust. You're convinced that the pages between the covers contain every element a bestseller requires, but the sales don't come anywhere near your expectations. So if not the story, what's the issue? Maybe it's your cover. Authors aren't always designers, and what appeals to you may not appeal to your readers. Hand the cover design over to professional graphic artists and let them apply their talents to the package of your masterpiece.
  2. Multiple Formats: Gone are the days when a book may have had one or two iterations: paperback and hardcover. You are living in a world where there should be eBook, print, and audiobook versions of your book. To increase your chances for sales, providing the book in all three formats is a great strategy, and with today's technology, it's easier than ever to go the multiple formats route.
  3. Write More Books: Want to sell more copies of your first book? Write a second book and a third--and many more. The key to making it into today's publishing world is to have multiple offerings. Readers are met with a veritable cornucopia of choices when it comes to what book they'll read next. They are of two minds: making a safe choice or discovering a great new talent. As an indie author, you have the opportunity to satisfy both minds if you have a number of books for them to read. You can be that great undiscovered talent they know they can trust with a story.

 

Let's face it, selling books is hard, but by adapting the three strategies listed above, you can make things a little bit easier for yourself.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

You may also be interested in…

Selling Books is Hard!

Book Covers Can Affect Sales

6,902 Views 5 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, selling, sales, cover_design, increase_sales
2

Your book's description is a great way to grab a potential reader's attention, so you want to make the most of that opportunity by using language that shows readers what they're in for instead of language that tells them. In other words, if you think your book is funny, don't say that in your description. Instead, write a description that is funny!

 

That may sound like common sense, but I've lost track of how many times I've checked out a book on Amazon but have declined to click "purchase" because the brief description says something like, "This entertaining, hilarious story will have you falling off your chair." I'd be much more inclined to buy the book if the description made me chuckle, even a little bit. Now if a reviewer writes things like that about your book, by all means use them, in quotes and with attribution, as often as you can. That's called third-party credibility, and it's golden in marketing.

 

To explain the concept of show vs. tell, I often use the analogy of online dating. Just like the endless selection of books available, there are countless online profiles vying for your attention. Imagine yourself scrolling through profile after profile, each of which includes a brief self-summary. Would you want to go on a date with a man who calls himself "smart, charming, and fun to be around?" Or would you rather meet a man whose self-summary clearly shows that he is smart, charming, and fun to be around­­? I would certainly choose the latter.

 

Now imagine a reader scrolling through endless options of books in search of a funny read. If he laughs or even cracks a smile when he gets to your description, what do you think he's going to do?

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

 

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in…

I'm Sure Your Book Is Wonderful, But Don't Tell Me So

Grab Readers' Attention with Your Hook

3,734 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, author, writing, amazon.com, promotions, book_description
0

Give Them a Reason

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 2, 2015

Do you know why someone should read your book? This isn't a rhetorical question. I'm asking only to then reveal brilliant insights on how to sell more books. It's a question that has an answer, but only you know it. People need a reason to read your book, and you have to give them that reason.

 

I've sat in many a marketing meeting in other industries where the question of consumer motivation was the focal point of discussion. You can't just create a product or service and expect the consumer to develop their own reason to shell out their hard-earned cash for it. Put another away, readers want to read your book; they just don't know why yet.

 

Think of how the marketing world sells products. They tell us something is new and improved. They tell us special pricing is available for a limited time. They tell us when something is one of a kind. They tell us when something is classic or bold or life changing. Marketers are not shy in creating a need for the products or services they're trying to sell.

 

You can't approach marketing your book with the mindset of an author. You have to design a marketing campaign with a commercial zeal. Indie authors are in the unique position of wearing multiple hats, but all those hats fit your entrepreneurial role. You are the artist. You are the publisher. You are the marketing department. Approach each position without fear.

 

Now, why should someone read your book? What need will be satisfied by reading your book? More importantly, how are you going to convey that need in the simplest terms possible?

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

The Marketing Maze

Three Marketing Websites for Authors

1,227 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing
1

Do You Need Swag?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 19, 2015

When I first got into indie publishing, I had to deal with a huge learning curve. I knew writing. I had been doing it for a couple of decades before I released my first title. The part I didn't know was what to do with a book once it's written, so I went on a self-taught publishing journey to find out how authors sell books. I got into blogging to support book sales. I tried personal videos to support book sales. I dove into social media to support book sales. I was building a platform. Then I went to Book Expo America, and I saw something I didn't expect to see in the literary world. I saw swag.

 

I wandered the floors of the convention hall, and I saw tote bags sporting images of book covers. I saw T-shirts. I saw magnets. I saw pens. I saw ties. I saw things at Erotica booths that I can't even mention. It blew my mind. Publishers and authors were giving stuff away by the truckload to help get the word out about their books.

 

I had a signing at some point during the show, and I sat next to an author who had boxes of this swag that she gave away with each book she signed. I had nothing, and I actually started to feel like I was shortchanging the people who got signed copies of my book. For the rest of the convention, I continually saw that author's name on a tote bag somewhere in the enormous facility. I even saw one of her ties on the streets of New York a few days later.

 

Swag works. Do you need it? Not necessarily, but if you've got a signing coming up, do yourself a favor, and bring some items with your name and book's title on it to give away. People eat that stuff up, and you may get some free advertising out of it.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

The Marketing Maze

1,017 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, book_signing, promotions, swag
0

In my last post, I said that for the overwhelming majority of authors, it's important to make an effort to connect with your fans. The same goes for having a good headshot. If you're selling millions of copies of your books each year, no need to read further.

 

Almost daily I receive an email from an author asking me a variation of the same question: "How do I market my book?" For those who have websites or author pages on Amazon (two things I've recommended in previous posts), I almost always look them up to see if I might want to interview them for a blog post, to check out their books, etc. And you know what? Nine out of ten times I cringe at the headshot because it looks so unprofessional. If your headshot looks like it was taken at Sears in the 1970s or cropped out of a group photo at a barbeque, it's time to get a new one.

 

If you're going to present yourself to the world as a professional writer, you need to look professional. Speaking engagements are a perfect example--put yourself in the shoes of a person deciding between two author candidates with roughly the same qualifications. Would you choose the guy in the flower shirt holding a spatula, or the woman in the tasteful suit sitting next to an elegant vase filled with flowers? They say you can't judge a book by its cover, but we all know everyone does.

 

Contrary to popular belief, a headshot doesn't have to cost a lot of money--or any money. I bartered for a recent one with a woman I met at a business networking group who needed some help editing her website. I got what I needed, and she got what she needed, a win-win!

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

 

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Lights, Camera, Smile!

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

1,348 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, headshots
0

How to Be Retweetable

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 12, 2015

Before social media the goal of an author was to write something memorable. It's still the goal today, but there's the added goal of writing something retweetable. Twitter is a mecca of viral content just waiting to be shared via retweet over and over again. The trick is writing something in 140 characters that moves your followers and their followers to retweet your content.

 

Here are some good rules of thumb to craft retweetable content and build your brand across the Twitterverse.

 

  1. You don't really have 140 characters: If you're using up all the characters allotted in a tweet, you're not allowing for followers to add their own two cents. You'd be surprised how many want to add their points of view to a message. If you can come in at 70-100 characters, your message is all the more retweetable.

  2. Pick your spots: According to Track Maven, Tuesday and Wednesday are the days with the highest volume of tweets, but weekends are where the largest number of retweets occur. The point? Your followers will be more likely to see your tweets during the week, but on weekends there's a greater likelihood that a smaller number or your followers will retweet your content and share it outside of your network, exposing your brand to a larger number of people.

  3. #usehashtags: Hashtags do get you retweeted, and the more you use, the more likely it is you'll be retweeted. A lot of people limit them or avoid them altogether, but there are a number of studies that say three to five hashtags in a tweet increases your chances of being retweeted.

  4. Three words that will greatly increase your retweet volume: By simply putting, "Please Retweet Now" in your tweet, you will see a marked increase in the number of retweets you receive.

 

Of course, the best way to receive a lot of retweets is to take advantage of the social aspect of Twitter and engage with followers, so they are more likely to support your career as an author, and make sure it's a two-way street. Support their dreams, too.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

Twitter: A Global Tool That's Great for Connecting with Your Local Media

Can Twitter Make You a Better Writer?

1,343 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, promotion, writing, twitter, retweet, retweetable
1 2 3 4 ... 30 Previous Next

Actions