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514 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
2

Until recently I had no idea how easy it is to make an audiobook. My publisher always took care of that, so I didn't pay much attention. For my latest novel, however, my publisher decided not to make an audiobook, so I decided to do one myself. Here's how the process works:


1. Go to ACX and set up an account.

2. Search for your book using your name, the book's title, or its ISBN.

3. Claim ownership of your book.

4. Upload your cover.

5. Set parameters for how and how much you want to pay.

o    Options include splitting royalties with the narrator or paying the narrator a fee per completed hour.

o    Top-notch narrators charge around $300 per completed hour. My most recent book is 250 pages and about six-and-a-half hours spoken.

6. Solicit auditions for narrators to read a few pages of your book.

o    You will receive an email each time you have a new audition to review.

7. Choose the narrator you want. (I chose the talented Amy McFadden, who narrated one of my earlier books.)

8. After the narrator is finished, you can listen to the entire thing on ACX and either approve it or request changes.

9. Once you approve the audiobook, you pay the narrator (I used PayPal).

10. The narrator indicates to ACX that he/she has been paid.

11. ACX distributes your audiobook through Audible, Amazon, and iTunes under both exclusive and non-exclusive contracts. If you grant non-exclusive distribution rights, then you can distribute through additional channels.

12. Each retailer independently prices your audiobook, generally based on its length.

13. Track sales through your author dashboard on ACX.

14. Get paid royalties monthly via direct deposit.


That's it! If you have any other questions about the process, let me know in the comments. If there are enough, I'll ask my narrator Amy to answer them in a future post.


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Creating multiple formats and versions

How big is your digital footprint?

1,063 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, audiobooks
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This may surprise you, but you are not in the business of building a brand for your book. That's not to say that branding isn't part of your job description as an author in today's publishing world. Like it or not, branding is crucial to selling books.


Your book clearly has brand elements. The cover is a branding tool. The genre helps determine the brand. Your writing style is part of the book's brand. The branding of a book is definitely part of your responsibilities, but it's not the most important. What could be more important? Building and establishing your author brand.


We have discussed numerous ways to build an author brand on this blog for years now, and the internet is full of pointers on how to build an author brand. You need only do an internet search for "How to build an author brand," and you'll have volumes upon volumes of information at your fingertips.


My suggestion is to study author branding like you are trying to earn your master's degree on the topic. Study it until you move from learning about the topic to being an expert on the topic. Develop your own personalized strategy. Create your own author branding philosophy. You should even write a short (or long) essay on the topic so you know that you can articulate your ideas on author branding to other authors or groups of authors. Be the knowledge you need to succeed.


You are the brand, not your book.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The foundation of your brand

How to build a brand without even really trying

832 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, writing, branding, author_branding
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Brands to avoid

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Aug 23, 2017

Here are three brands you should avoid modeling as you set out to build your author brand.


1. A Contrived Brand: Essentially, you're trying too hard to be a brand. At the risk of sounding like a new-age guru, you're not being your authentic self. You're presenting yourself in a way that you think is appealing to your readers, and your readers can feel the phony persona through their computer screens and mobile phone displays. Relax. Be yourself. Don't force a brand. Author brands are built over time, post after post, interaction after interaction.


2. The Whiny Brand: Oh woe is me.  I can't catch a break. I try so hard. Readers don't want to invest in an author who is desperate. Readers want to invest in an author whose talent speaks for itself. Don't let your bad days seep into your brand building efforts. I'm not saying you have to be up and positive all the time. Be angry. Be down. Be contemplative. Be all the things human beings are, but above all, be confident.


3. The Vengeful Brand: If you get a bad review, let it go. Don't rally the troops and have them exact revenge on the reviewer. That's petty, and it lacks a certain amount of humility people like to see in their authors. Don't take bad or good reviews to heart. They are opinions and nothing more. Whatever you do, don't let reviews shape your author brand.


A successful author brand is nothing more than a personal brand with a little more juice. Never lose sight of the fact that you are trying to sell books, but also never lose sight of who you really are.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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What makes you similar to other author brands?

Uniting Author Brands

1,225 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, branding, brand_awareness
1

 

It's 2017, and it turns out social media wasn't a fad. It's going to be around for a while.  That being the case, we probably should have a refresher course on social media best practices. It's a short list, and it's easy to follow.


1. Be prolific: To paraphrase David Mamet, always be posting. It's all about staying active and generating a lot of content. The more your friends and followers see your name pop up in their feed the more they will be reminded that you're their author-friend. 


2. Engage: Don't miss an opportunity to engage with a friend and follower. When they take the time to comment on one of your posts, "like" their comment or respond to their comment. Let them know you appreciate their contribution. I will give one word of caution. Don't "like" inappropriate comments. You don't want to be seen as someone who supports offensive material. I've even deleted inappropriate comments posted by fans, and I sent them a private message explaining why I did it, and to be frank, in one case the commenter did not take it well, but it was the right decision.

 

3. Be light: Yes, there is a time to make serious comments on social media, but don't let that be your sole persona online. Don't be that person. Be the type of person who entertains and enlightens. Be opinionated. Be bold. Be kind. Be funny. People should look forward to seeing your posts every day.


That's it. It doesn't get more complicated than that. Now, go forth and post, engage, and entertain.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Social Media Best Practices

 

Social Networking Sells Your Brand

 

 

 

 

3,910 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, social_media, author_marketing, social_media_marketing
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There is no doubt about it. More and more people have short... Oh, look a squirrel. Neat. Okay, back to what I was saying. People have very short attent... Cool, the squirrel's back, and he's eating something... ATTENTION SPANS! People have short attention spans because there are so many distractions in the world today. There's social media, videos, TV, streaming, gaming, etc. Capturing the attention of a reader online these days is extremely difficult, and there are more ways to drive them away than to attract them to your content.


What you don't want to do is give them huge chunks of material to digest once you do get them to notice you. Online content shouldn't be novel length. Your videos shouldn't be feature film length. You want to write short and concise blog articles, and your videos should ideally be around three minutes. Long form is not your friend online.


There are exceptions to the rule, and those exceptions usually are associated with established brands. TED Talks are an example of long form video that works because they've built their brand on that sort of thing. Long posts about politics get special consideration because they are normally about politicians with their own brands.


Chances are, you're not an exception. You aren't an established brand. You are building a brand. That being the case, keep your online content short, concise, and easily digestible. As your brand becomes more mainstream, then you can graduate to longer content.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.



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Top five listicle about listicles

Social media best practices



764 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, promotion, writers, social, branding, social_media, author_brand, online_content
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Platform is a word that you hear thrown around a lot today. One might even call it an overused word. New indie authors entering the publishing world are likely to be bewildered and maybe even intimidated by the proliferation of talk about platforms. They may be asked, "What is your author platform?" Or, they may hear, "You need a multi-platform approach in order to reach as many readers as possible." They could even be told that, "A cross-platform strategy is the most optimal solution to create buzz about your book."


That's a whole lot of "platforming" going on. Allow me to try and add some sense to the flood of platform talk in publishing:


1. "What is your author platform?" This is in reference to your mode of brand building apparatus. Do you use social media to establish your brand? Are you a blogger? Do you produce online videos to build your brand? Each segment of your online presence is a part of your platform. When someone asks you what your author platform is, they are asking you how you're getting the word out on a regular basis.


2. "You need a multi-platform approach in order to reach as many readers as possible." This statement is simply saying that the more versions of your book that are available for sale, the more readers you will reach. In today's word that means a print version, a digital version, and an audio version. If you do the math that means the same book can be available in three different "platforms."


3. "A cross-platform strategy is the most optimal solution to create buzz about your book." This statement is in reference to what marketing vehicles you are utilizing to market your books, which include your platform and the platforms of other brands. Are you contributing posts to another author's blog? Are you appearing on another online video personality's channel? Are you a part of another author's or artist's social media community? In addition, you will provide the same marketing opportunities to these same individuals that have given you a piece of their virtual space. You are sharing brand communities.


To complicate things a little bit more, the word platform is used in other contexts in other industries, so there's always going to be some confusion surrounding the word, but I hope for now, the publishing industries platform conundrum is less challenging to understand.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Three Planks of Your Author Platform

 

Consistency: how to develop a living platform

 

 

 

 

913 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, branding, social_media, author_marketing, author_platform, author_identity, authro_brand
0

 

We've established on numerous occasions on this blog that videos are extremely effective brand building tools for authors. Here a three types of videos that can help you grow your author brand:


1. Entertain: You're a writer. You know how to be creative. Use your skills to put together skits that are funny, poignant, absurd, whatever your preference may be. For brand purposes, it would be extremely useful if the videos matched the tone of your books, but if you want to stretch, that's not totally out of the question. I've seen some highly entertaining videos by authors that focus solely on their newest book. In my case, they were extremely effective because I purchased the books.


2. Educational: As we established earlier, you are a writer. You know the craft of writing. Why not put together a series of videos that allows you to pass your knowledge along to the people of the Internet. Outline a writing topic for a three-minute video, create some graphics as support material, and turn on your camera.


3. Informative: I know I may be splitting hairs here, but I draw a distinction between being educational and being informative. In both cases you teach something, but when you educate someone, you are giving them a skill set. When you inform someone, you are giving them knowledge that doesn't necessarily apply to developing a skill. For example, gossip is information, but it does nothing to improve a particular skill. So, informational videos are great brand-building tools for authors. Interview other authors. Talk all things genre related. And, yes, if insider gossip is your thing and you want to attach your brand to it, have at it.


If you haven't used video to build your brand yet, I can't recommend it enough. Once you get the hang of it, it can be really fun.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Build Your Brand with Video Readings

 

Four Personal Video Tips

 

 

 

 

837 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, videos, branding, social_media, vlogging
0

When it comes to marketing, you're going to want to nail down the genre of your book as soon as you can. Yes, I know most authors know the genre before they even start writing, but a surprising number of authors reject the notion of genre fiction. Most do it as a misguided artistic choice, but some do it because they don't want to limit their reading audience.

 

By choosing a genre, you're not limiting your reading audience, you're identifying them. My suggestion is to dive deeper and select your sub-genre categories. The more specific you can get the more likely it is that you are going to be able to locate your readers and market to them more effectively.

 

One of my books falls under the following category, genres, and sub-genre: Teen and Young Adult -- Horror -- Science Fiction and Fantasy -- Science Fiction -- Post-Apocalyptic. Now, I have been contacted by many adult readers who've expressed that they enjoyed the book, so you may think that by putting the book in the Teen and Young Adult category that I am limiting my reach with a potential pool of readers. But in reality, there is a segment of adult readers that seek out Teen and Adult books. However, conversely, the segment of teen and young adult readers seeking out adult market books is much smaller. So, the smarter play here is to categorize it in the Teen and Young Adult market where I will reach a majority of interested readers.

 

Categories, genres, and subgenres, weren't invented by retailers to help them organize their titles. They were invented by publishers to help them market their books. Know your genre and you know your reader.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Bending genres

Find smaller markets to sell more books

4,867 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, promotion, genre, marketing_for_your_genre, genre_marketing
2

I was recently playing around with my Goodreads profile to update it with my latest novel when I saw an "add preview" option underneath each of my books. I don't know if this is a new feature or one I simply never noticed, but I quickly took advantage of it! Here's how it works:


  1. When you log into Goodreads.com, on the top right corner of the home page you will see your photo. (If you don't have a Goodreads profile, make one now!)
  2. If you click on your photo, the drop-down menu will include "author dashboard."
  3. Go into your author dashboard, and you will see your book(s), the number of reviews, etc.
  4. Underneath each title you will see the "add preview" option.
  5. Click on the "add preview" button and follow the instructions to upload a sample. (What you upload is up to you. For my books I chose the prologue, or the first chapter if there is no prologue.)


That's it! Now when people visit my profile page or come across the detail page of any of my books, they will be able to open a sample chapter just by clicking on a button that says "preview."


Here's what the detail page for my newest book looks like.


Here's what the sample looks like.


Isn't that cool? Just like giving free tastes at an ice cream shop, offering readers a free glimpse of your writing is a great way to draw them in. If they enjoy the sample, chances are they're going to want to keep reading and will be willing to pay to do it. That translates into a sale for you, as well as a potential new fan!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing tip: put your first chapter on your website

Promote your book with Goodreads

 

 

 

1,213 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, goodreads, promotions
0

In a recent post I described a launch party a super fan of mine was planning for my latest novel (Bridges) on Facebook. I wasn't sure what to expect and promised to report back on how it went, so here you go!


The party wasn't enormous, but in my opinion it was a big success. I think around 50 people attended, which is more than I see at my physical launch parties. Here's how it unfolded:


  • The super fan/host (Veronica) began the party by posting a meme that read "roll call," and in the comments everyone who was "in attendance" wrote where they were located. Attendees ranged from Alabama to Oregon, with one woman logging in from the Philippines!
  • Every five minutes Veronica posted a meme with either a fun question (e.g. what's your dream job?) or an action item that would make the attendee eligible for a giveaway (e.g. "sign up for Maria's newsletter for a chance to win a signed copy of Bridges.")
  • If the meme included an action item, it also included a link to where to complete the action item (e.g. my website to sign up for my newsletter.)
  • In between the giveaways and games, Veronica posted a photo of me and opened it up to questions in the comments. This was my favorite part of the evening, because it gave me a chance to interact directly with my fans.

 

Here's a link to the party if you'd like to see exactly how it unfolded. (It says 88 attended, but I don't think that's accurate given how many people answered roll call and participated in the activities. Then again, maybe some attendees just wanted to observe. Or maybe people RSVPd "yes" but didn't attend.)


In all I gained dozens of new followers on social media, and I hope I gained some new readers too. Regardless, I had a great time and would definitely do it again!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

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What is a virtual book tour?

Book parties don?t have to cost money



773 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, book_marketing, social_media, book_launch, book_party
3

Building a brand is not rocket science nor is it particularly laborious. If done right, it requires very little effort. It will require some of your time, and you may have little to spare, but if you set aside some of that precious time to build your brand, you will be rewarded for your sacrifice. Here are the three key components of building an author brand:


1. Be you: We've discussed this many times on the blog. An author brand bridges the worlds of art and commerce. You are an artist seeking commercial success. Your brand won't be a corporate brand, nor will it be a purely personal brand. It will be something in between. Your focus is to just be you with a slight nod towards your readers' interests. In the beginning, you will represent your typical reader. Build your brand to make yourself happy.


2 ABB: Always be branding. Again, this isn't too taxing. You are just being you. Just be you in a more public setting. Do some or all of the following, frequently: post to your blog, tweet, update your Facebook status, create videos, etc. Just keep putting yourself out there and making your voice be heard.


3. Interact: Once you take the digital realm with the intention of building your brand, you're going to want to start conversations with your readers. Engage with you friends, followers, and readers. Let their voices be heard. You are building more than a brand. You are building a community.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The foundation of your brand

Be authentic to your brand

1,121 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, branding, brand_development
0

About 10 years ago, I can remember very distinctly that some marketing experts were predicting the death of email, not just as a marketing tool, but as a form of communication. It was thought that text and social media would totally replace the need for emails. Well, according to some estimates, about 74 trillion emails are sent every year. It appears the public did not get the memo that email was supposed to be dead.


But the fact that email is still used does not mean it is effective as a marketing tool. If you were to ask me if email marketing works on me, I'd give you an emphatic no. However, that doesn't mean it doesn't work. I'm willing to believe I'm wrong. A lot of stuff annoys me that thrills others, so we need to do a deeper dive.


DMR, a clearinghouse of statistics and information on digital marketing, has done an oft referenced study that says the following:


  • Percentage of "opened" emails opened on a desktop: 55.2%
  • Percentage of "opened" emails opened on a smartphone: 25%
  • Percentage of "opened" emails opened on a tablet: 7.3%
  • Percentage of users who made a purchase from an email opened on a mobile device: 6.1%
  • Percentage of users who clicked on link in email in the US on a mobile device: 13.7%
  • Percentage of users who clicked on link in email in the US on a Desktop computer: 18%


Further research in the industry indicates that consumers are more likely to open marketing emails from brands that they are familiar with, and regular, relevant communication is the key to making emails from brands enticing.

 

The future is likely to see the number of people using desktop computers to read emails decrease, so if you are going to use email as a marketing tool, start making your content easily read and shared on mobile devices.


So, is email marketing an effective tool for authors? If you all aspects of your platform are active, yes. That is to say, if you continue to use social media, personal appearances and blogs to interact with readers, marketing emails can be an effective addition to your marketing efforts.

 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Is email marketing effective?

Marketing tip: build that email list

1,074 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, email_marketing, effective_marketing, email_blasts, author_adivce
0

 

We all have our own systems for managing our lives. For example, I use a paper calendar and not the calendar on my phone. I know that's old school, but I love my paper calendar! I also have a paper to-do list that I keep on my desk, and I constantly have alarms going off on my phone to remind me of things on my to do list when I'm not at my desk. It's a hodgepodge system, but it works for me, which is the most important thing.


When it comes to book marketing, I adhere to the same philosophy: It doesn't matter what system you use, as long as you use a system. The more you do to spread the word about your books, the more moving parts there are, which makes it easy for things to fall through the cracks.


     Here are two ways I keep track of my various marketing efforts:

 

  1. Excel spreadsheet for media/blogger outreach
  2. My email in-box as a virtual to-do list


 

Excel spreadsheet for media/blogger outreach


Pitching media and bloggers for book reviews or inclusion in roundups such as beach/holiday/spring break reads can be fun at first, but it can also quickly become overwhelming if you don't keep track of whom you pitched and when, with what result. I use a color-coded system, e.g. yellow cells for things that need following up, green cells for secured reviews, red cells for passes. That way I can quickly scan the spreadsheet to see what needs to be done.


 

Email in-box as a virtual to-do list

 

I try to keep my in-box as small as possible, yet I never move or delete a message until I've done whatever action it requires. Years ago I tried moving messages into various folders (e.g. "articles to read"), but then I learned that I would rarely (actually, never) go into those folders. So I changed the system to one that works for me.


What systems do you use to keep organized? Please let me know in the comments!


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Marketing tip: connect with book bloggers

 

Marketing tip: ask your fans to promote you

 

 

 

 

1,104 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, organization, author_tips, author_advice
1

Here is a rule of branding that isn't discussed enough. Don't turn on a dime.

 

Simple enough? Okay, see you next blog post...

 

What? You need more context? That's fair.

 

You can change your author brand, as long as you don't change it too quickly. A brand, after all, is built on consistency. You present the same style, the same tone, the same voice over and over again, creating a trust between yourself and your community. You become a source of stability in their lives, something they can rely on and take comfort in.

 

The problem is that an author brand is a personal brand in a commercial setting. Your brand is tied to...well, you. You are going to go through changes in life. Trust me, I am not the same person I was in my 20s. I see things very differently. Had I had access to social media back then (meaning, if it existed), I would have a hard time reconciling what I believe now with what I believed then.

 

To change a brand--personal or corporate--you must allow it to go through a transition period. A gradual change brings your community along with you. A sudden change leaves you, in most cases, having to start anew. Don't resist change. Embrace it, and let it come slowly. Except in the case of unexpected tragedies, that's usually how change works anyway.

 

The takeaway here is to not change for the sake of change. Don't hop on a trend that is in opposition to your current brand profile because you think it will help grow your community. Just keep consistently being you, even if being you means you change along the way.

 

-Richard

 

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Should Authors Ever Reinvent Their Brands?

Author Brand Success: Consistency without Stagnation

1,410 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, book_marketing, branding, author_marketing, author_brand, author_platform
1

When my novels come out I usually have one launch party where I live (New York City) and one in my hometown in California. The parties typically include a no-host bar, with me at a table signing books and chatting with a mix of friends, family, and fans--low-key but good fun. For my latest novel, a super fan of mine, Veronica, who lives in Texas, asked if I'd be doing a "virtual party" as well. I told her I had zero idea what that was, so she offered to plan one for me on Facebook. Curious as to how that would work, I said yes!


Here's what happened next:


  • Veronica created an event on Facebook just like any other event, then invited me along with all her friends.
  • She made sure the event was marked as "public" so invitees could invite their friends, I could invite my friends, fans, etc. (In other words, anyone who had a Facebook account could attend.)
  • She created multiple "games" related to my books for attendees to play during the party. Each game was a fun question that Veronica would post, and attendees would answer in the comments section.
  • To add a visual touch, she made a cute meme to go with each question.
  • Veronica put all of the above into a detailed itinerary for the party, which was to last for three hours so people could pop in and out. It included a "roll call," in which everyone in attendance stated their location (and a greeting if they wanted) in the comments section.
  • Interspersed with the trivia questions were giveaways of signed copies of my individual books--plus a grand prize of signed copies of them all!


I know that I was fortunate to have a fan organizing this party for me, but it's now evident that it's something I could have done on my own--which means you can too!


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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What Is a Virtual Book Tour?

How to Connect with Your Readers

1,699 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, launch_party, virtual_party
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