Skip navigation
1 2 3 4 ... 35 Previous Next

Resources

522 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
2

Beyond the book

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 25, 2017

In order to sell lots of books, you may have to release versions of your novel that go beyond the physical book. Here are three other media platforms that may help you build your community and sell more books.

 

1. Audiobook: In another time, they were called books on tape, and then CDs became the preferred format. When we started consuming digital audio files, audiobooks were born. An audiobook version of your novel is a natural transition. I have taken the leap, and I have to tell you I had a blast working on them. From selecting a narrator to uploading the files, developing an audiobook is a truly exhilarating process. The fact it can grow your readership (listenership) is a delightful bonus.

 

2. The stage: I know it sounds like a stretch, but a stage version of your book has the potential to grow your audience. Granted, that audience will be limited to the people in the theater, but social media gives them their own platform to tell their friends and followers about the adaptation of your book to a play. I attended a play in California where the playwright sold and signed copies of her book after the performance of her play based on the book. By the looks of it, she did very well.

 

3. Podcast: This is kind of a mixture of an audiobook and a stage play. The podcast version of your book mimics radio theater. Like a stage play, you would use actors to act out the parts. Unlike a stage play, you would serialize the material and present each segment via a podcasting service on the same day and at the same time. The hope is that you will build buzz as folks wait in anticipation for your next chapter.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

What makes you different?

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

1,530 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: books, marketing, selling, promotion, podcast, audiobooks, platform
2

Word-of-mouth is a powerful force, and there's nothing wrong with encouraging your fans to tell their friends about your book. The key word here is fans. It's clear that a person is a fan of your book if she writes a favorable review on her blog, if he sends you an email telling you he enjoyed it, if she signs up for your newsletter, etc. In those situations, ask away!


What I don't recommend is asking people who are not fans to act like they are. I recently received an email from a self-published author, whom I hadn't met, asking me to forward a one-page description of his novel, which I hadn't read, to my network of contacts. The "description" he included was essentially a glowing review of his book. It was also written in the first person. That meant that if I did send it to anyone, it would appear that I'd written it.


What would you have done in that situation? I imagine the same thing I did, which was to thank the author for getting in touch and to tell him I couldn't promote a book I hadn't read. I felt bad for him because he had clearly put a lot of effort into his outreach. His email to me was personalized, which got me to read it - good! If he'd only added in the additional step of offering to send me a copy so I could read it before possibly recommending it, who knows what might have happened. I'm always looking for a good read.


If right now you're thinking, "I don't know if I have any fans to ask for help," you can start by including a note in your email signature along the lines of, Did you enjoy my book? Please tell your friends! If it results in a recommendation, it will be an honest one.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Marketing tip: make it easy for readers to contact you

Marketing idea: encourage your fans to spread the word

920 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, author, promotions, word_of_mouth
3

 

Here are three building blocks of a good marketing campaign, with resources for each:


1)   Website



Andiamo Creative: www.andiamocreative.com

Author Support: www.authorsupport.com


Note: Andiamo Creative recently revamped my website if you'd like to have a look: www.mariamurnane.com.


If you're good with design tools and/or your budget is tight, free services such as Wix, Website Builder, and GoDaddy are options. (Just be careful not to end up with a site loaded with advertising, which can look gauche and turn off potential readers.)


2)   Newsletter

I recommend using a newsletter program over email for multiple reasons, such as the option for subscribers to opt in (or out), and your ability to track subscriber engagement. Two solid vendors are:


Mailchimp: www.mailchimp.com

Constant Contact: www.constantcontact.com


I use Mailchimp, which is free for unlimited messages to less than 2500 subscribers, and $30+ per month on a sliding scale of subscribers from there. (Click here to see what a recent newsletter looks like.)


3)   Business cards, postcards, bookmarks, etc.

Easy-to-carry giveaways with information about your book are a great marketing tool, and the following vendors offer fantastic pricing:


Vista Print: www.vistaprint.com

Got Print: www.gotprint.com


I recently ordered 250 customized, two-sided, color business cards from Vista Print for $22.99. (I believe there are also more basic card options for free.) Each of my cards includes my website color, logo and tagline: Bestselling novels about life, love and friendship.


Book marketing is hard work and takes a lot of energy, which can leave authors of every genre feeling overwhelmed and discouraged. While there's no magic formula for conducting a marketing campaign, the basic elements above will get you started, and in my opinion that's half the battle.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Marketing Tip: Business Cards

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

1,928 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, websites, promotions, newsletters, email_campaigns
13

Auditing your readers

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 27, 2017

 

Businesses, big and small, do frequent audits to gauge their success. They inventory product. They perform extensive ROI (return on investment) on advertising and marketing campaigns. They research and evaluate the demographics of their customer base. They evaluate the effectiveness of their workforce. They look at everything from the amount of money they spend on staples to the salaries of executive officers, all in the interest of maximizing their productivity.


You are an indie author, which means you are technically a small business owner. You should be auditing your business just like the major corporations. You won't know how to grow unless you know where you stand.


Start with your readers. You might be asking how you can possibly audit your readers. How can you possibly know who your readers are? Because you know your genre. Genres are demographic-specific by design. By-in-large, they attract a common core of readers who are from the same age group and in a lot of cases, the same gender. Depending on your genre, you can even narrow down even further. Find out as much information on the demographic that represents the typical reader of your genre. A simple query with your favorite search engine should get you started. Dive deep. Know their likes, their dislikes, and where they are most likely to share their likes and dislikes with others in their demographics. Know them like you know members of your own family.


Auditing your readers is the best way to build effective marketing campaigns and give you confidence that you are spending your branding time wisely.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in?

 

Create a reader profile

 

Categories, genres, and subgenres

 

 

 

 

2,514 Views 13 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, self-publishing, readers, writing, genre, social_media
7

The emotional brand

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 20, 2017

You may be diligent about keeping your social media accounts active. You may be tweeting umpteen times a day. It's possible that you are updating your status consistently and frequently. Your fingers may even hurt from all the friend and follower engagement you're conducting from your laptop and/or smartphone. You may be putting in more than enough time to expect steady growth in your social media connections which will lead to the expansion of your brand, and ultimately, more book sales. But it's quite possible your activity isn't paying off either.


The question is why do some authors succeed at growing their brand through a rigorous social media strategy and others don't. The answer is usually those who succeed have discovered what truly sets an author brand apart from other brands. That one simple ingredient that so few authors use out of a fear of sharing too much or being too provocative. That one simple ingredient is emotion. An author brand is an emotional brand. It conveys a heart and soul that corporate brands normally steer clear of. You are an artist first and a commodity second.


If you are angry about something in the news or in your neighborhood, convey that anger. If you are embarrassed or happy or sad, share those emotions. You will connect with your community on a deeper level and that will lead to a growth of your brand. In short, give yourself the same kind of emotional depth that you give your characters in your book, and you will find that brand success if you've been looking for.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

Evaluating your author brand

The one thing



1,180 Views 7 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, social, brand, branding, social_media, author_marketing, author_brand
2

Years ago I attended a seminar on book cover design that was hosted by one of the Big Six (at the time) publishers. As an indie author just getting started, I wanted to know all the secrets of the industry. What I discovered is there are no real secrets. There's a quote that comes from John Wanamaker, a department store mogul in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, that embodies what I learned that day in the marketing/cover design seminar. He famously proclaimed, "Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don't know which half."


 

The only thing that didn't match in his quote is that the success rate in traditional publishing is only about 30 percent. Keep in mind, there are entire departments in major publishing houses with the sole purpose of researching the best way to market a book. These are folks with advanced degrees in some cases that conduct focus groups and use scientific studies to determine what a color represents to a consumer. What font is more appealing on a cover. Are people more likely to buy a book with a human face on the cover or an inanimate object. They explore every little detail.


The presenter at the seminar talked about one particular case involving the European release of a book that had done well in the States. They researched and created mockups and conducted focus groups, and they chose a cover that was nothing like the American version. The book failed miserably in Europe. With all their resources, they couldn't find a cover that helped the book sell. 


You probably don't have the resources of the major publishers. With that in mind, here's how you should go about picking a cover design for your next book. Pick something that appeals to one person, you. Whatever grabs you, that's the cover for your book.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in?

The will

Don't burn yourself out



1,139 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: cover, marketing, design, formatting, promotion, cover_design
1

A couple years after my first novel was released, I noticed a title on Amazon with the same name. I read that book's description and realized it was also in the same vein as mine, which had been featured on the front page of the Life section of USA Today and also (briefly!) reached No. 2 overall on Amazon. In other words, it was not hidden under a rock for those in the publishing world. Curious as to why the author (and/or her publisher) would choose the same title as my book, I went to her Author Page on Amazon. It was blank. Then I looked her up on LinkedIn. Nothing. Then I typed her name into Google. Zip. Then Facebook. Nada.


If I'd been able to connect with my book-title-twin author, who knows what might have happened? Maybe we'd have ended up sharing marketing stories. And ideas. And readers. Now we'll never know.


Are you easy to find online? If you're not making tons of money off your book(s), you should be, because you never know what opportunities might pass you by because no one can find you. Opportunities don't come around every day for authors, but if you're reading this post then you already know that.


Even if you do nothing else to market your book, why not fill in your Amazon Author Page and provide some contact information? It's so easy. And it's free! It's not like you're giving away your Social Security number and your mom's maiden name. A simple email address will do. If you're worried about being deluged with messages, you can set up a specific email address just for this purpose.


Here's a link that explains how to complete your Amazon Author Page.

Here's what mine looks like.


What are you waiting for? Do it!


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Marketing Tip: Set up an Author Page on Amazon

Have you created your Amazon Author Page yet?

1,240 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, self-publishing, promotions, author_central
0

How to scare readers

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 11, 2017

Do you want to know how to scare people? I mean really scare people. We all have our fears. Public speaking, bear attacks, heights: you name an object, animal, place, state of being or activity, and you will find someone who is absolutely terrified of it. The problem is that not everyone is afraid of the same thing. You could write a truly terrifying novel about a bear going on a summer-long man-killing rampage in a national forest, but it may only find a limited audience because you focused on the device of your horror and didn't delve into the cost. 


To write a horror novel that is universally scary, you have to do one thing. You have to make the readers care. Namely, you have to make them care about your main characters. When your readers have an emotional investment in your protagonist, they will fear the potential loss you have in store for them. If a bear stalks a stranger, it offers some thrills and tense moments, but if a bear stalks someone you've grown to know and root for, it chills you to the bone. You know the cost if the character is lost to a brutal bear attack.


As an example, the horror classic Halloween does a superb job of getting you to care and then scares you to death. First, we get to know Laurie Strode. She's a good kid that loves her parents and feels a little awkward in her skin. She has a rapport with the kids she babysits, and she's a good friend. We like her. We care about her. We are terrified for her.


Remember, your scare tactics in a novel become universally scary when you make your readers care about your characters.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Horror and the Subgenres

The Elements of Horror

821 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, author, horror, writing, horror_genre
3

Until recently I had no idea how easy it is to make an audiobook. My publisher always took care of that, so I didn't pay much attention. For my latest novel, however, my publisher decided not to make an audiobook, so I decided to do one myself. Here's how the process works:


1. Go to ACX and set up an account.

2. Search for your book using your name, the book's title, or its ISBN.

3. Claim ownership of your book.

4. Upload your cover.

5. Set parameters for how and how much you want to pay.

o    Options include splitting royalties with the narrator or paying the narrator a fee per completed hour.

o    Top-notch narrators charge around $300 per completed hour. My most recent book is 250 pages and about six-and-a-half hours spoken.

6. Solicit auditions for narrators to read a few pages of your book.

o    You will receive an email each time you have a new audition to review.

7. Choose the narrator you want. (I chose the talented Amy McFadden, who narrated one of my earlier books.)

8. After the narrator is finished, you can listen to the entire thing on ACX and either approve it or request changes.

9. Once you approve the audiobook, you pay the narrator (I used PayPal).

10. The narrator indicates to ACX that he/she has been paid.

11. ACX distributes your audiobook through Audible, Amazon, and iTunes under both exclusive and non-exclusive contracts. If you grant non-exclusive distribution rights, then you can distribute through additional channels.

12. Each retailer independently prices your audiobook, generally based on its length.

13. Track sales through your author dashboard on ACX.

14. Get paid royalties monthly via direct deposit.


That's it! If you have any other questions about the process, let me know in the comments. If there are enough, I'll ask my narrator Amy to answer them in a future post.


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Creating multiple formats and versions

How big is your digital footprint?

1,739 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, audiobooks
0

This may surprise you, but you are not in the business of building a brand for your book. That's not to say that branding isn't part of your job description as an author in today's publishing world. Like it or not, branding is crucial to selling books.


Your book clearly has brand elements. The cover is a branding tool. The genre helps determine the brand. Your writing style is part of the book's brand. The branding of a book is definitely part of your responsibilities, but it's not the most important. What could be more important? Building and establishing your author brand.


We have discussed numerous ways to build an author brand on this blog for years now, and the internet is full of pointers on how to build an author brand. You need only do an internet search for "How to build an author brand," and you'll have volumes upon volumes of information at your fingertips.


My suggestion is to study author branding like you are trying to earn your master's degree on the topic. Study it until you move from learning about the topic to being an expert on the topic. Develop your own personalized strategy. Create your own author branding philosophy. You should even write a short (or long) essay on the topic so you know that you can articulate your ideas on author branding to other authors or groups of authors. Be the knowledge you need to succeed.


You are the brand, not your book.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

The foundation of your brand

How to build a brand without even really trying

1,321 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, writing, branding, author_branding
0

Brands to avoid

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Aug 23, 2017

Here are three brands you should avoid modeling as you set out to build your author brand.


1. A Contrived Brand: Essentially, you're trying too hard to be a brand. At the risk of sounding like a new-age guru, you're not being your authentic self. You're presenting yourself in a way that you think is appealing to your readers, and your readers can feel the phony persona through their computer screens and mobile phone displays. Relax. Be yourself. Don't force a brand. Author brands are built over time, post after post, interaction after interaction.


2. The Whiny Brand: Oh woe is me.  I can't catch a break. I try so hard. Readers don't want to invest in an author who is desperate. Readers want to invest in an author whose talent speaks for itself. Don't let your bad days seep into your brand building efforts. I'm not saying you have to be up and positive all the time. Be angry. Be down. Be contemplative. Be all the things human beings are, but above all, be confident.


3. The Vengeful Brand: If you get a bad review, let it go. Don't rally the troops and have them exact revenge on the reviewer. That's petty, and it lacks a certain amount of humility people like to see in their authors. Don't take bad or good reviews to heart. They are opinions and nothing more. Whatever you do, don't let reviews shape your author brand.


A successful author brand is nothing more than a personal brand with a little more juice. Never lose sight of the fact that you are trying to sell books, but also never lose sight of who you really are.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

What makes you similar to other author brands?

Uniting Author Brands

1,420 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, branding, brand_awareness
2

 

It's 2017, and it turns out social media wasn't a fad. It's going to be around for a while.  That being the case, we probably should have a refresher course on social media best practices. It's a short list, and it's easy to follow.


1. Be prolific: To paraphrase David Mamet, always be posting. It's all about staying active and generating a lot of content. The more your friends and followers see your name pop up in their feed the more they will be reminded that you're their author-friend. 


2. Engage: Don't miss an opportunity to engage with a friend and follower. When they take the time to comment on one of your posts, "like" their comment or respond to their comment. Let them know you appreciate their contribution. I will give one word of caution. Don't "like" inappropriate comments. You don't want to be seen as someone who supports offensive material. I've even deleted inappropriate comments posted by fans, and I sent them a private message explaining why I did it, and to be frank, in one case the commenter did not take it well, but it was the right decision.

 

3. Be light: Yes, there is a time to make serious comments on social media, but don't let that be your sole persona online. Don't be that person. Be the type of person who entertains and enlightens. Be opinionated. Be bold. Be kind. Be funny. People should look forward to seeing your posts every day.


That's it. It doesn't get more complicated than that. Now, go forth and post, engage, and entertain.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in…

 

Social Media Best Practices

 

Social Networking Sells Your Brand

 

 

 

 

4,407 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, social_media, author_marketing, social_media_marketing
0

There is no doubt about it. More and more people have short... Oh, look a squirrel. Neat. Okay, back to what I was saying. People have very short attent... Cool, the squirrel's back, and he's eating something... ATTENTION SPANS! People have short attention spans because there are so many distractions in the world today. There's social media, videos, TV, streaming, gaming, etc. Capturing the attention of a reader online these days is extremely difficult, and there are more ways to drive them away than to attract them to your content.


What you don't want to do is give them huge chunks of material to digest once you do get them to notice you. Online content shouldn't be novel length. Your videos shouldn't be feature film length. You want to write short and concise blog articles, and your videos should ideally be around three minutes. Long form is not your friend online.


There are exceptions to the rule, and those exceptions usually are associated with established brands. TED Talks are an example of long form video that works because they've built their brand on that sort of thing. Long posts about politics get special consideration because they are normally about politicians with their own brands.


Chances are, you're not an exception. You aren't an established brand. You are building a brand. That being the case, keep your online content short, concise, and easily digestible. As your brand becomes more mainstream, then you can graduate to longer content.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.



You may also be interested in...

Top five listicle about listicles

Social media best practices



901 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, promotion, writers, social, branding, social_media, author_brand, online_content
0

 

Platform is a word that you hear thrown around a lot today. One might even call it an overused word. New indie authors entering the publishing world are likely to be bewildered and maybe even intimidated by the proliferation of talk about platforms. They may be asked, "What is your author platform?" Or, they may hear, "You need a multi-platform approach in order to reach as many readers as possible." They could even be told that, "A cross-platform strategy is the most optimal solution to create buzz about your book."


That's a whole lot of "platforming" going on. Allow me to try and add some sense to the flood of platform talk in publishing:


1. "What is your author platform?" This is in reference to your mode of brand building apparatus. Do you use social media to establish your brand? Are you a blogger? Do you produce online videos to build your brand? Each segment of your online presence is a part of your platform. When someone asks you what your author platform is, they are asking you how you're getting the word out on a regular basis.


2. "You need a multi-platform approach in order to reach as many readers as possible." This statement is simply saying that the more versions of your book that are available for sale, the more readers you will reach. In today's word that means a print version, a digital version, and an audio version. If you do the math that means the same book can be available in three different "platforms."


3. "A cross-platform strategy is the most optimal solution to create buzz about your book." This statement is in reference to what marketing vehicles you are utilizing to market your books, which include your platform and the platforms of other brands. Are you contributing posts to another author's blog? Are you appearing on another online video personality's channel? Are you a part of another author's or artist's social media community? In addition, you will provide the same marketing opportunities to these same individuals that have given you a piece of their virtual space. You are sharing brand communities.


To complicate things a little bit more, the word platform is used in other contexts in other industries, so there's always going to be some confusion surrounding the word, but I hope for now, the publishing industries platform conundrum is less challenging to understand.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in?

 

The Three Planks of Your Author Platform

 

Consistency: how to develop a living platform

 

 

 

 

1,261 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, branding, social_media, author_marketing, author_platform, author_identity, authro_brand
0

 

We've established on numerous occasions on this blog that videos are extremely effective brand building tools for authors. Here a three types of videos that can help you grow your author brand:


1. Entertain: You're a writer. You know how to be creative. Use your skills to put together skits that are funny, poignant, absurd, whatever your preference may be. For brand purposes, it would be extremely useful if the videos matched the tone of your books, but if you want to stretch, that's not totally out of the question. I've seen some highly entertaining videos by authors that focus solely on their newest book. In my case, they were extremely effective because I purchased the books.


2. Educational: As we established earlier, you are a writer. You know the craft of writing. Why not put together a series of videos that allows you to pass your knowledge along to the people of the Internet. Outline a writing topic for a three-minute video, create some graphics as support material, and turn on your camera.


3. Informative: I know I may be splitting hairs here, but I draw a distinction between being educational and being informative. In both cases you teach something, but when you educate someone, you are giving them a skill set. When you inform someone, you are giving them knowledge that doesn't necessarily apply to developing a skill. For example, gossip is information, but it does nothing to improve a particular skill. So, informational videos are great brand-building tools for authors. Interview other authors. Talk all things genre related. And, yes, if insider gossip is your thing and you want to attach your brand to it, have at it.


If you haven't used video to build your brand yet, I can't recommend it enough. Once you get the hang of it, it can be really fun.


-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in…

 

Build Your Brand with Video Readings

 

Four Personal Video Tips

 

 

 

 

978 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, videos, branding, social_media, vlogging
1 2 3 4 ... 35 Previous Next

Actions