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506 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
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I was recently playing around with my Goodreads profile to update it with my latest novel when I saw an "add preview" option underneath each of my books. I don't know if this is a new feature or one I simply never noticed, but I quickly took advantage of it! Here's how it works:


  1. When you log into Goodreads.com, on the top right corner of the home page you will see your photo. (If you don't have a Goodreads profile, make one now!)
  2. If you click on your photo, the drop-down menu will include "author dashboard."
  3. Go into your author dashboard, and you will see your book(s), the number of reviews, etc.
  4. Underneath each title you will see the "add preview" option.
  5. Click on the "add preview" button and follow the instructions to upload a sample. (What you upload is up to you. For my books I chose the prologue, or the first chapter if there is no prologue.)


That's it! Now when people visit my profile page or come across the detail page of any of my books, they will be able to open a sample chapter just by clicking on a button that says "preview."


Here's what the detail page for my newest book looks like.


Here's what the sample looks like.


Isn't that cool? Just like giving free tastes at an ice cream shop, offering readers a free glimpse of your writing is a great way to draw them in. If they enjoy the sample, chances are they're going to want to keep reading and will be willing to pay to do it. That translates into a sale for you, as well as a potential new fan!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing tip: put your first chapter on your website

Promote your book with Goodreads

 

 

 

973 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, goodreads, promotions
0

In a recent post I described a launch party a super fan of mine was planning for my latest novel (Bridges) on Facebook. I wasn't sure what to expect and promised to report back on how it went, so here you go!


The party wasn't enormous, but in my opinion it was a big success. I think around 50 people attended, which is more than I see at my physical launch parties. Here's how it unfolded:


  • The super fan/host (Veronica) began the party by posting a meme that read "roll call," and in the comments everyone who was "in attendance" wrote where they were located. Attendees ranged from Alabama to Oregon, with one woman logging in from the Philippines!
  • Every five minutes Veronica posted a meme with either a fun question (e.g. what's your dream job?) or an action item that would make the attendee eligible for a giveaway (e.g. "sign up for Maria's newsletter for a chance to win a signed copy of Bridges.")
  • If the meme included an action item, it also included a link to where to complete the action item (e.g. my website to sign up for my newsletter.)
  • In between the giveaways and games, Veronica posted a photo of me and opened it up to questions in the comments. This was my favorite part of the evening, because it gave me a chance to interact directly with my fans.

 

Here's a link to the party if you'd like to see exactly how it unfolded. (It says 88 attended, but I don't think that's accurate given how many people answered roll call and participated in the activities. Then again, maybe some attendees just wanted to observe. Or maybe people RSVPd "yes" but didn't attend.)


In all I gained dozens of new followers on social media, and I hope I gained some new readers too. Regardless, I had a great time and would definitely do it again!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

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What is a virtual book tour?

Book parties don?t have to cost money



700 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, book_marketing, social_media, book_launch, book_party
3

Building a brand is not rocket science nor is it particularly laborious. If done right, it requires very little effort. It will require some of your time, and you may have little to spare, but if you set aside some of that precious time to build your brand, you will be rewarded for your sacrifice. Here are the three key components of building an author brand:


1. Be you: We've discussed this many times on the blog. An author brand bridges the worlds of art and commerce. You are an artist seeking commercial success. Your brand won't be a corporate brand, nor will it be a purely personal brand. It will be something in between. Your focus is to just be you with a slight nod towards your readers' interests. In the beginning, you will represent your typical reader. Build your brand to make yourself happy.


2 ABB: Always be branding. Again, this isn't too taxing. You are just being you. Just be you in a more public setting. Do some or all of the following, frequently: post to your blog, tweet, update your Facebook status, create videos, etc. Just keep putting yourself out there and making your voice be heard.


3. Interact: Once you take the digital realm with the intention of building your brand, you're going to want to start conversations with your readers. Engage with you friends, followers, and readers. Let their voices be heard. You are building more than a brand. You are building a community.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The foundation of your brand

Be authentic to your brand

952 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, branding, brand_development
0

About 10 years ago, I can remember very distinctly that some marketing experts were predicting the death of email, not just as a marketing tool, but as a form of communication. It was thought that text and social media would totally replace the need for emails. Well, according to some estimates, about 74 trillion emails are sent every year. It appears the public did not get the memo that email was supposed to be dead.


But the fact that email is still used does not mean it is effective as a marketing tool. If you were to ask me if email marketing works on me, I'd give you an emphatic no. However, that doesn't mean it doesn't work. I'm willing to believe I'm wrong. A lot of stuff annoys me that thrills others, so we need to do a deeper dive.


DMR, a clearinghouse of statistics and information on digital marketing, has done an oft referenced study that says the following:


  • Percentage of "opened" emails opened on a desktop: 55.2%
  • Percentage of "opened" emails opened on a smartphone: 25%
  • Percentage of "opened" emails opened on a tablet: 7.3%
  • Percentage of users who made a purchase from an email opened on a mobile device: 6.1%
  • Percentage of users who clicked on link in email in the US on a mobile device: 13.7%
  • Percentage of users who clicked on link in email in the US on a Desktop computer: 18%


Further research in the industry indicates that consumers are more likely to open marketing emails from brands that they are familiar with, and regular, relevant communication is the key to making emails from brands enticing.

 

The future is likely to see the number of people using desktop computers to read emails decrease, so if you are going to use email as a marketing tool, start making your content easily read and shared on mobile devices.


So, is email marketing an effective tool for authors? If you all aspects of your platform are active, yes. That is to say, if you continue to use social media, personal appearances and blogs to interact with readers, marketing emails can be an effective addition to your marketing efforts.

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Is email marketing effective?

Marketing tip: build that email list

998 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, email_marketing, effective_marketing, email_blasts, author_adivce
0

 

We all have our own systems for managing our lives. For example, I use a paper calendar and not the calendar on my phone. I know that's old school, but I love my paper calendar! I also have a paper to-do list that I keep on my desk, and I constantly have alarms going off on my phone to remind me of things on my to do list when I'm not at my desk. It's a hodgepodge system, but it works for me, which is the most important thing.


When it comes to book marketing, I adhere to the same philosophy: It doesn't matter what system you use, as long as you use a system. The more you do to spread the word about your books, the more moving parts there are, which makes it easy for things to fall through the cracks.


     Here are two ways I keep track of my various marketing efforts:

 

  1. Excel spreadsheet for media/blogger outreach
  2. My email in-box as a virtual to-do list


 

Excel spreadsheet for media/blogger outreach


Pitching media and bloggers for book reviews or inclusion in roundups such as beach/holiday/spring break reads can be fun at first, but it can also quickly become overwhelming if you don't keep track of whom you pitched and when, with what result. I use a color-coded system, e.g. yellow cells for things that need following up, green cells for secured reviews, red cells for passes. That way I can quickly scan the spreadsheet to see what needs to be done.


 

Email in-box as a virtual to-do list

 

I try to keep my in-box as small as possible, yet I never move or delete a message until I've done whatever action it requires. Years ago I tried moving messages into various folders (e.g. "articles to read"), but then I learned that I would rarely (actually, never) go into those folders. So I changed the system to one that works for me.


What systems do you use to keep organized? Please let me know in the comments!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Marketing tip: connect with book bloggers

 

Marketing tip: ask your fans to promote you

 

 

 

 

1,031 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, organization, author_tips, author_advice
0

Here is a rule of branding that isn't discussed enough. Don't turn on a dime.

 

Simple enough? Okay, see you next blog post...

 

What? You need more context? That's fair.

 

You can change your author brand, as long as you don't change it too quickly. A brand, after all, is built on consistency. You present the same style, the same tone, the same voice over and over again, creating a trust between yourself and your community. You become a source of stability in their lives, something they can rely on and take comfort in.

 

The problem is that an author brand is a personal brand in a commercial setting. Your brand is tied to...well, you. You are going to go through changes in life. Trust me, I am not the same person I was in my 20s. I see things very differently. Had I had access to social media back then (meaning, if it existed), I would have a hard time reconciling what I believe now with what I believed then.

 

To change a brand--personal or corporate--you must allow it to go through a transition period. A gradual change brings your community along with you. A sudden change leaves you, in most cases, having to start anew. Don't resist change. Embrace it, and let it come slowly. Except in the case of unexpected tragedies, that's usually how change works anyway.

 

The takeaway here is to not change for the sake of change. Don't hop on a trend that is in opposition to your current brand profile because you think it will help grow your community. Just keep consistently being you, even if being you means you change along the way.

 

-Richard

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Should Authors Ever Reinvent Their Brands?

Author Brand Success: Consistency without Stagnation

1,285 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, book_marketing, branding, author_marketing, author_brand, author_platform
1

When my novels come out I usually have one launch party where I live (New York City) and one in my hometown in California. The parties typically include a no-host bar, with me at a table signing books and chatting with a mix of friends, family, and fans--low-key but good fun. For my latest novel, a super fan of mine, Veronica, who lives in Texas, asked if I'd be doing a "virtual party" as well. I told her I had zero idea what that was, so she offered to plan one for me on Facebook. Curious as to how that would work, I said yes!


Here's what happened next:


  • Veronica created an event on Facebook just like any other event, then invited me along with all her friends.
  • She made sure the event was marked as "public" so invitees could invite their friends, I could invite my friends, fans, etc. (In other words, anyone who had a Facebook account could attend.)
  • She created multiple "games" related to my books for attendees to play during the party. Each game was a fun question that Veronica would post, and attendees would answer in the comments section.
  • To add a visual touch, she made a cute meme to go with each question.
  • Veronica put all of the above into a detailed itinerary for the party, which was to last for three hours so people could pop in and out. It included a "roll call," in which everyone in attendance stated their location (and a greeting if they wanted) in the comments section.
  • Interspersed with the trivia questions were giveaways of signed copies of my individual books--plus a grand prize of signed copies of them all!


I know that I was fortunate to have a fan organizing this party for me, but it's now evident that it's something I could have done on my own--which means you can too!


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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What Is a Virtual Book Tour?

How to Connect with Your Readers

1,269 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, launch_party, virtual_party
0

I've scoured the internet for a clear explanation of the difference between marketing and branding. I've heard people use the terms interchangeably, and frankly, that's just wrong. They serve the same purpose, but they are two different tools serving that purpose. After reading, rejecting those explanations that made no sense, and accepting those that seemed logical, here is an explanation of branding:

 

  • ·        Branding is an image and message tied to a product. In the case of an author, this would include the genre identity, category (fiction or nonfiction), age group of readers, style of writing, personal causes, and frequent topics an author devotes his/her online time to. These and other image definers contribute to how the author is seen by the reader. Personal appearance can play a part if the author makes appearance integral to his/her brand identity.

 

Marketing is a tad more complicated. Here is a culmination of the explanations I found:

 

  • ·      Marketing is a multifaceted tool the author will use to draw people to his/her brand. It can be by utilizing social media to build relationships with readers. It can be via advertising to make the public aware of a book signing or launch date. It can be done via interviews online and offline. Essentially, it is how you make the public aware of your image and message.

 

Going by these two definitions, you can see how they serve the same utility but in very different ways. The two go together, but they are not the same thing.

 

-Richard

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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You're not just an author, you're a brand

Raising your marketing game

1,433 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, book_marketing, branding, author_marketing, author_brand
1

Today's rule could essentially be summed up in the Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young song, "Teach Your Children." The song is a classic that encourages us to pass along our knowledge of life to all the generations without judgment or expectation of anything in return. I know it sounds kind of heavy for a branding strategy, but the more young writers you selflessly help along the way, the greater service you do for the community of writers and society as a whole. And, yes, even though you shouldn't expect a return on your investment of time and knowledge, you most likely will receive enormous returns in the form of loyal disciples of your brand.


So, I say to you, seasoned writer, teach aspiring authors well. Share your dream with them. Find opportunities to assist other writers in achieving their dreams. Give them constructive feedback on their manuscripts. Help them navigate the indie publishing world. Give them marketing and branding advice. You may even encourage them to pass along what they know to up-and-coming writers.


Being an author is being part of a community. We don't have competitors. We have fellow authors. By helping to strengthen the community, you are helping yourself in the most unselfish way possible. You can't go wrong with this strategy. I don't care where you are in your writing career. You have useful knowledge to share. You probably don't even have to dig that deep to find it.


Grow your brand by following the rule of coaching, and teach the writers well.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Bring Your Community Together through Writing

Your Brand is a Community

1,075 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, promotion, writing, branding, author_brand
1

An essential element of any book marketing campaign is securing reviews on Amazon, Goodreads, book blogs, etc. However, to get reviewers to read your book, you're going to have to send them a copy. That generally means buying print copies, packing them up, then schlepping back and forth to the post office. This process can become time-consuming and expensive, especially if you're contacting a lot of people.


Another option is to send reviewers digital copies via Amazon. Given how much cheaper most digital books are compared to their print counterparts, this is a great way to get your work out there without breaking the bank. (Tech-savvy reviewers might be up for receiving MOBI files, which don't cost anything to email, so if you're techy too, you can always try that.)


Have you ever bought a digital book on Amazon as a gift? If not, here's all you have to do:


  1. Click the "Give as a Gift" option among the purchase buttons on the right side of the page
  2. Enter the email address linked to the recipient's Amazon account (Be sure to ask the reviewer for this information because sometimes people use a different address for online shopping than they do for other things. I know I do!)
  3. Enter the recipient's name
  4. Type in a personal note
  5. Click "Place your order"


That's it! Within minutes the recipient will receive an email from Amazon with a link to download your book to his or her Kindle device or reading app. For the diehard reviewers who insist on reading print copies only, you can still do the post office thing. Just remember to request the book rate. It's way cheaper than regular mail.


An added bonus of sending your book via Amazon is that you get a royalty for each one you buy, which brings down your overall cost. (This also applies for print versions you gift directly from Amazon, which will also save you that trip to the post office.) So what are you waiting for? Get pitching!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Get Reviews for Your Indie Book

Dos and Don'ts of Soliciting Book Reviews

3,043 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, blogging, writing, book_reviews
0

 

Today's branding rule is a simple one. Not that any of the rules have been particularly complicated, but this one is perhaps the easiest concept to grasp. You are an author, which means your brand is tied to your work. Otherwise it wouldn't be an author brand, it would be a personal brand.


The rule of productivity says the more books you have on the market, the bigger your brand becomes. That's it. As long as you do what you're supposed to do as an author--publish books--your brand has a greater likelihood of being discovered and growing.


Can you publish one book and establish yourself as a brand? It's been done, yes. Before Go Set a Watchman was published in 2015, Harper Lee was a well-established author after her one and only previous offering, To Kill a Mockingbird, was published in 1960. And I'm sure there are other examples too. Some may be recent inductees into the "overnight success" categories, but the truth is Harper Lee represents the exception to the rule. Such a situation is rare.


The rest of us must commit to writing and publishing as many books as we have in us as quickly as we can. The larger our catalogs of books available for sale to the public, the more opportunities we have of being discovered and solidifying our author brands. So, here&'s the shorthand version of the rule of productivity: Write. Publish. Grow your brand. Repeat. Write. Publish...you get the point.


-Richard

 

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Power of Multiple Titles

 

You Have More Than One Book Inside of You

 

 

 

 

869 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, branding, author_brand, author_advice, author_identity
1

 

I often wonder what some of our legendary authors would do in today's publishing world when it comes to branding. I think we all have this notion that they would look down their noses at such pedestrian tactics--that they'd never stoop to marketing themselves, and I have to say, I disagree. I think they'd be branding machines.


Particularly Hemingway. I imagine that he just couldn't resist taking to Twitter or Facebook and firing off a comment about the day's events. He was a journalist, after all. He loved to comment on the news, especially war-related stories. I imagine he wouldn't be shy about using one of the most important branding tools used today in the world of social media. That is to say, I think he would be particularly adept at author engagement. If someone commented on one of his status updates or tweets, I like to think he'd respond and engage the reader. Granted, he would perhaps get into a verbal tussle or two with those who had dissenting opinions, but I also think he'd happily respond to those who were in agreement with him.


If you aren't engaging with your readers on social media, you are missing the opportunity to create dedicated fans--those who will see you as more than just some random author, but as someone they've made a connection with. They also become devoted members of your volunteer sales force. They will be more likely to spread the word about your book.


So, in conclusion, be like Hemingway (as I imagine him), and engage with your readers.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

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Word of mouth is still king

 

Community engagement prompts

 

 

 

 

735 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, social_media, author_marketing, author_brand, author_tips, author_platform
0

Reaching out to book bloggers is a great way to get objective, credible reviews. In addition to posting their reviews on their own websites, many bloggers are also active on social media, which can draw additional eyeballs to your work. (For example, here's a recent tweet by a blogger promoting her thoughts on my latest novel, Bridges.)


Like most people, reviewers often have particular genres they prefer to read. Below are some ways to find bloggers who might be a good fit for your book. These are not the only ways, but they will definitely help you find a lot of people to pitch:


  • Search the titles of popular books that are like yours, plus the word "review," then scroll through the results and see which are book blogs.
  • Search "book blog" plus words that describe your genre, e.g., "mystery," "romance," "thriller," "memoir," etc.
  • Search for companies that specialize in "blog tours." Many of them feature the "stops" on the tour, i.e., the bloggers they got to review their clients' books. Look for a book in your genre, and there you will find a list of relevant bloggers to pitch.


Once you find a blog that looks perfect for you, look to see which blogs that blogger follows. (There is usually a list on either side of the home page.) Click on one, then go back and repeat the process. Soon you will have a big list of bloggers to contact.


NOTE: When you start pitching, track your correspondence. I use a spreadsheet for this, but any system that works for you will do. Just use a system, or your hard work will eventually become a confusing mess. (Scrolling through the sent folder of your email is not a "system.") Recording your outreach can be a pain, but it's well worth the effort. Not only will it keep you organized now, it will keep you from having to start from scratch when your next book comes out.


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing tip: connect with book bloggers

Don't make this marketing mistake

926 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, blogging, writing, promotions, bloggers, marketing_tip
0

Over the next several weeks we're going to discuss the different elements of successful branding for authors. Author brands are a mix between corporate branding and personal branding. You're trying to sell a product, yes, but more accurately, you're trying to sell you, the author.


Branding isn't just how you look or how you present yourself. Those things can come into play, even in the world of publishing. That's not to say you have to be a runway model or Brad Pitt to sell books. I'm referring more to style when I say "look." If you're the cowboy mystery writer, give your readers the cowboy mystery writer look.


Toda's lesson in branding is simple. In order to be associated with a brand, you have to demonstrate consistency: in your messaging, your appearance, your attitude. Consistency will help cement your brand and make you easily definable. And, yes, that's important because when your readers tell their friends about you, they'll know how to describe you. In essence, you will have given them a portable brand to share with their friends.


In addition to consistency in how you present yourself and message, consistency in where you "practice" your branding is important too. If Twitter is your thing, make that your primary branding pad. If you are more at home on Facebook or Instagram, that's where you're going to spend a bulk of your branding time. You can use other sites to support your brand building, but you're going to want to have a go-to site where people will expect to find you.


Consistently keep on message on your social media turf and make yourself easily definable.


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Author Brand Success: Consistency without Stagnation

Can You Choose an Author Brand?



1,813 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, author_marketing, author_brand, author_platform
2

 

The other day I was catching up with my friend and fellow author Andrea Dunlop, who is also a social media consultant. She mentioned that she'd had success promoting her debut novel, Losing the Light, on Instagram. Never having used the platform myself, I asked her if she could give me (and my loyal blog readers) some pointers, and she kindly agreed! Here's what she had to say:


A lot of authors are initially a bit baffled as to how to use such a visual medium for book promotion. To get you off on the right foot, here are four of the most common questions I get about Instagram from clients, answered:


  1. Who should use it? Any author can make great use of Instagram because, like Facebook and Twitter before it, the platform now has a critical mass of users, meaning that even niche books can find an audience with a bit of research and some canny use of hashtags. However, Instagram is especially good for any book that has visual elements (think cookbooks or design books) and books of any genre whose audience skews young and female. This is especially true for YA books but applies to plenty of literary and commercial adult fictions as well (and most fiction readers are female, FYI).
  2. What do I put on there? If you're using the platform primarily as an author, aim for at least 75% book-related posts. Note, I do not mean 75% posts about your book and your book only (please don't do that on any social media platform). Share reading recommendations, behind-the-scenes shots of your workspace, pictures of works-in-progress (marked up manuscripts, covers, page proofs, galleys) photos from book events, etc. Instagram gives you a lot of space to write captions, so take advantage and share some more in-depth thoughts on what you're reading or writing. You could really do all book posts if you wanted, but I think it's nice to use the platform to show off some of your personality as well with pictures pertaining to your hobbies, your pets, travel, where you live, etc. And don't forget hashtags! Some of the most popular for readers are #bookstagram, #instabook, #igreads, #bookish, and #booknerd.
  3. How frequently do I need to post? I recommend posting daily--three times per week at a minimum. Don't worry if it takes you a while to get the hang of taking photos, using filters, using hashtags, etc.
  4. What if I don't get very many followers? Not to worry. As with all social media, there's more to it than follower count. If you can build up several thousand followers or more, that's awesome, but you've got books to write, and this is but one platform in your overall marketing strategy. The best thing you can do is establish a relationship with readers and fellow bookstagrammers so that when you do have a book to share with them, you're already a part of a community who is excited to hear from you.


So, go, dive in! Feel the #bookish love. You can follow me (@andreadunlop), of course, and here are a few other authors who I think are killing it on the platform:

  • R. S. Grey (@authorrsgrey)
  • Tara Austen Weaver (@tea_austen)
  • Rachel Del (@racheldelxo)
  • Kevin Kwan (@kevinkwanbooks)
  • Liza and Lisa (@lisaandliz)


Many thanks to Andrea for sharing her expertise! To learn more about her consulting services, visit www.andreadunlop.net.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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