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470 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Test a New Idea or Concept? Experiment! -The Future of Ink

Creative business coach Laura West shares her ideas on how to properly test that crazy concept you just can't let go.                                           


6 Key Book Marketing Strategies for Authors -Marketing Tips for Authors

Do you have a newsletter?

 

Film

                                                        

Using Negative Space in Film - A Moon Brothers Film Blog

Oh, what to do with that empty space in your frame?

 

Check Out 7 Filmmaking Tips from Indie Film Icon Kevin Smith - No Film School

Should you be editing while you shoot?

                         

Music

 

How to Make Money with Your Music This Week - Bob Baker's The BuzzFactor.com

One band made more than $600 in one week with just one of Bob's ideas.

 

Avoid Vocal Cord Injuries...Touch Base with your Vocal Coach Between Tours -Judy Rodman

It seems there have been many vocal injuries by big-name singers lately. Judy thinks consulting a vocal coach could have prevented them. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - August 23, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - August 16, 2013

3,023 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, selling, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, promotion, book_marketing, films, musicians, filmmakers
5

If you could somehow gather everything ever written or said about marketing and absorb the content in one exhausting weekend, you would most likely come away with two words engrained in your head: sell yourself. For example, if you've written a thriller, so have thousands of other authors. The one thing that truly sets your thriller apart from the others is you.

 

You may not be comfortable with selling yourself. I get it. It's not in my wheelhouse either. I've done more than a few presentations on marketing over the years, and I used to cringe when I was introduced as a marketing expert or guru. Yes, I come from a marketing background, and I've made money giving out marketing advice, but marketing is something you never really master because so much relies on trends, opinions and wishes cast upon falling stars. At best, I am a marketing enthusiast. I am fascinated enough by the topic that I spend an inordinate amount of free time researching the latest and greatest in marketing. I may not know enough, but I know more than most.

 

So, if you are having trouble selling yourself as an expert in your field, don't. Sell yourself as enthusiast. If you've written a thriller featuring a crack detective as your main character but you've never worked in law enforcement, that doesn't mean you're not qualified to discuss police procedure. You've done your homework. You've read extensively on the topic. Perhaps you even interviewed a police officer or two. That makes you a well-informed enthusiast. This matters because your passion for police work gives you a platform to sell yourself, which in turn sells your work.

 

If you want to sell books today, you may not necessarily have to sell yourself. Find a term you feel at ease with. If you're not an expert on the topic featured in your work, then you are an enthusiast. Enthusiasts are passionate. In essence, you are not selling yourself as much as you are selling your passion.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Evaluating Yourself as an Indie Author

It's Not Just a Hobby, It's a Marketing Opportunity

4,575 Views 5 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, author, promotion
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Selling books is hard. I understand that because I fight the fight every day. I sometimes look at my sales figures and wonder why the universe is so angry with me. What have I done to deserve such a thing? I fret and search the internet for stories of authors who've made it in a big way, and I look for the magic bullet that garnered them all those wonderful sales, only to discover there usually was no magic bullet. Persistence and opportunity happened to converge in their lives and BAM! Books went flying off the virtual shelves.

 

Success should be earned. It should be something you struggle to achieve. That struggle is really just a series of trials that can lead you down one of two paths. You can either wind up feeling bitter for what hasn't happened, or you can feel appreciative for what you've learned along the way. If you choose the bitter path, you will undoubtedly ditch the persistence and miss the opportunity to succeed. If you chose the learning path, you'll crave to know more, and you'll be fully prepared to take advantage of opportunities when they present themselves to you.

 

I write all this because I've come across a few pronouncements by authors online that reeked of desperation. They've publicly lamented that they can't get anyone to buy their books, and the effort is just too great. Writing a book hadn't changed their lives like they thought it would. They make a plea for readers to do more. If readers don't, then the author will give up on his or her dream. Their plea usually falls on deaf ears. 

 

Guilt is the least effective marketing tool that I know of. It will have the opposite effect on readers. Desperation is an inevitable feeling when you think your dream is just too far out of reach, but don't let it taint this publishing journey for you. Learn from the struggle, appreciate it, and embrace the opportunities when they finally arrive.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Book Marketing Takes Persistence

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

2,230 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, promotion, sales, effective_marketing
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How a Great Twitter Bio Can Net You More Followers…and Sales! -BadRedhead Media

Your Twitter bio is important, so make it count.           

                                                    

Storyville: What is Literary Fiction? -Lit Reactor

The answer to that age-old question many authors have asked: "Did I just accidently write literary fiction?"

 

Film

                                                        

Social Media for #Filmmakers: Facebook 101 - Film Independent

To thrive in filmmaking today, you have to add one more job title to your list of many as an independent filmmaker: social media evangelist.

                                          

10 Pinterest Boards Filmmakers Should Be Following - Indiewire

Pinterest has become a social media favorite for a lot of filmmakers.

                                    

Music

 

11 Ways to Sabotage Studio Vocals - Judy Rodman

Judy lists some the habits and choices that influence your vocals.

 

The Accident That Changed Modern Guitar Sound - The Big Picture Music Production Blog

Who knew a little accidental guitar distortion would have such a huge impact on music?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - August 9, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - August 2, 2013

2,418 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, indie, sales, writers, writing, films, promotions, filmmakers, social_media, author_brand, music_production, vocals
3

If you want to promote your book on Twitter, I suggest not tweeting about your book - or at least not very often. Here are two things you should do instead:

 

1. Tweet information that is useful to others.

 

I don't tweet a ton, but when I do, it's usually a link to a post I've written about book marketing or writing, or a link to an article I've read that I think will help other authors. The links to my own posts drive people to my website, where they can also learn all about my novels. This way I'm providing them information they find valuable, but I'm also getting my work in front of them without being pushy.

 

2. When someone begins to follow you, ask why.

 

Anytime I receive a notification that I have a new follower, I send that person a tweet of thanks and also ask why he or she decided to follow me. The response is usually one of two things. Either the person is an aspiring or published author who appreciates my suggestions on book marketing and writing, or she is a loyal fan of my novels. Once I know the answer, I can engage in a conversation with the follower. If it's someone who hasn't read my books, I send a link to the first chapter of the first book in the series and hope she will take a look. If it's a loyal reader, I send her a link to my fan page, which includes a list of easy ways to spread the word about my novels. (You'd be surprised how willing your fans are to help you if you just ask them.)

 

It's fine to promote your book now and again, but when all I see in a person's Twitter feed is an endless stream of BUY MY BOOK!, I immediately lose interest. You probably would too, right?

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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How Not to Market

Book Marketing Tip: Make It Easy for Your Fans to Help You

13,349 Views 3 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions, twitter, tweet
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In my blog post about doing a book relaunch, I talked briefly about how giving your book a new cover could give you a reason to reintroduce your book to the reading public. But giving your book a new cover can do more than give you a new marketing opportunity; it can give you a more marketable book.

 

If your sales have hit a slump or you feel they've never reached their peak, you may want to take a serious look at your cover. Covers matter today more than ever. With so many books published every year, you have to make your book stand out among the millions of other titles competing for readers' attention online. When I say "stand out," I don't mean for the wrong reasons. Your cover should be professionally designed. If you have the skills to undertake such a task, have at it. But if the concept of creating a cover is foreign to you, hire a professional cover design artist to do the work.

 

Whether you have the skill set to design a cover or you hire someone else to do it, don't enter the arena without knowledge of what works as far as cover design for books in your genre. Yes, genre should be a major consideration when you're designing your cover. Fortunately, thanks to retail sites like Amazon.com, you have a place where you can research the cover designs of bestselling books in your genre. Do your research and give your book a similar look and feel. I'm not suggesting you copy another author's book cover; I'm merely telling to you to use bestselling book covers as an inspiration for your cover design. There are design similarities among them for a reason; they work to attract readers in the genre.

 

Your book is worth reading. If you're on top of your marketing and people still aren't reading it, it might be time to consider a new, professional cover design.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Beat Writer's Block with Cover Design

Going Indie? Don't Skimp on Quality

4,453 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, promotions, book_covers
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The Book Relaunch

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Aug 5, 2013

One of my favorite trailers for a book was done five years ago by author Dennis Cass for his book, Head Case. The trailer wasn't for the initial release of the book. It was for the release of the paperback version, hence the title of the video: Book Launch 2.0. I'll post it here for your viewing pleasure:


*Can't see the player? Click here to view the video on YouTube.


You can see that Dennis is a funny guy with a real sardonic wit, but that's not why I'm drawing your attention to it. I bring it up because it points out a marketing opportunity a lot of us ignore: the relaunch. In Dennis' case, he's taking the initiative to reintroduce a book that had already been launched in a different format.


Indie authors can do the same. In previous posts, we've already touched on the fact that our books usually exist in more than one format now. Most of us will publish both a print version and a Kindle version. Why not have a virtual launch for each? If you're about to publish your book in a new format, you have the opportunity to announce the release on two occasions with a lot of pomp and circumstance. You could do the same if you choose to release it in audiobook format through ACX.


If you've released your book in every available format, you can always upgrade. We live in an age where changing the cover is a relatively easy process. You could freshen up your book with a new cover and reintroduce it to your fans. Will they buy a book just because it has a new cover? Not likely, but your relaunch could motivate them to tell their friends and family about it.


There are numerous opportunities for you to launch your book. Why not take advantage of them all?


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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What Is a Platform?

The Evergreen Era of Publishing

3,567 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, book, author, promotion, formats, launch, book_launch, book_release
1

Every month or so, I receive an email from a friendly indie author (whom I met just once) about an upcoming book signing for his novel. The events are always several thousand miles away from where I live, but I admire his efforts to promote his book.

 

Unfortunately, however, his messages regularly make me cringe.

 

Why? Because he sends them to dozens of people, all of us on the recipient line of the same email. This not only looks bulky and unprofessional, it is also bound to tick off potential supporters of his work. He also regularly commits another faux pas with his messages, which is to attach enormous PDF files. The last one he sent was nearly 7MB, which dramatically slowed down my small email program.

 

I always recommend using a free newsletter program such as MailChimp for email marketing campaigns. MailChimp is simple to use and creates a professional impression for your announcements, even if you only have a handful of subscribers. There also are many other email marketing tools to consider out there. These programs allow people to quietly unsubscribe without having to ask you to remove them. While it may sting when they do so, this ensures that your list is comprised of people who truly want to hear from you.

 

If you're resistant to a newsletter program and still want to use regular email, be sure to use the blind copy (BCC) feature. No one wants his or her email address out there on a massive list that could easily be forwarded and absorbed into questionable email marketing practices. We all get enough spam already.

 

As an author, you want the people on your email list to root for you, not dread hearing from you, right? Put yourself in their shoes before you send your next message, and that should prevent you from making awkward email missteps.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Make It Easy for Readers to Find You

To Be a Professional Writer, Make a Professional Impression

3,275 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, mailchimp, blind_copy
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The Author Press Kit

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jul 29, 2013

A lot of marketing has moved online, but author press kits still matter. Press kits are traditionally thought of as physical tools, but they are effective digitally as well. In fact, a digital press kit can be used to facilitate your marketing efforts in online venues as well as the brick-and-mortar realm. Here's what to include in your digital author press kit:

 

  1. Author photo - Make it count. You most likely don't want to use a photo you took of yourself or one your significant other took of you in front of the fireplace. Invest in a professional headshot if you can.
  2. Author bio - We've discussed in detail how to construct an effective author bio. You can provide a little more information in this environment than you can in the bio on your book cover.
  3. Cover image - Make sure all of your images are the highest quality allowed by your hosting site.
  4. Full synopsis of book - You can use the description you use for the book cover.
  5. One-sentence book description - When an organization is promoting your appearance, it would make their lives much easier to describe your book in a single compelling and concise sentence.
  6. Book details - This includes ISBN, page count, genre, etc.
  7. FAQ - Provide a list of the most frequently asked questions about your book along with your answers. If you haven't been asked questions about your book, it's okay to anticipate what readers may ask you.
  8. Sample - Include a short excerpt from the book.
  9. Buzz - If you've received positive reviews in the media or any other kind of media coverage, provide a link to the material.

 

By creating a digital author press kit, you are simplifying things for anyone who invites you to do a personal appearance or anyone who writes about you and your book. Your best strategy to achieve success is to be prepared for it.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Passive Income and Marathon Branding

Find Advocates with Free Books

5,878 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions, press_kit
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Finish Your Book's Second Draft - The BookBaby Blog

There is a blueprint to completing a second draft.

                                                    

5 Profitable Places to Sell Your Books - The Future of Ink

The non-bookstore item in this list is particularly interesting.

 

Film

                                                        

This Is Your Brain on Movies: Neuroscientists Weigh In on the Brain Science of Cinema - Truth Seekers

Can studying the effects of movies on the brain lead to creating better films?

                                          

Building a Movie - A Moon Brothers Film Blog

Creating a film is a lot like building a house.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Maybe You Should NOT Do Vocal Exercises - Judy Rodman

If you feel like you're doing your vocal exercises wrong, you're probably doing it wrong.

 

Tips on Getting Music Placed and Listened To -Musicgoat

Tips on reaching out to radio shows and podcasts to get your music heard.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - July 19, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - July 12, 2013

2,141 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, filmmaking, promotion, publishing, manuscript, music_marketing, musicians, craft, filmmakers, social_media, mdistribution
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Most Common Mistakes: When Your Scene Focuses on What Isn't Happening - Wordplay

If you're going to write about what your characters don't do, make sure it counts.

                                                    

How to Make Ordinary Characters Compelling -Writer's Digest

A character doesn't need unusual abilities or knowledge in order to be fascinating.

 

Film

                                                        

How Does P.T. Anderson Start Writing a Story? - Making the Movie

Paul Thomas Anderson discusses the coffee shop method for breaking through writer's block.

                                          

10 Tips for the Video Producer on Location in Summer's Heat - Videomaker

The dog days of summer are upon us. Do you know how to beat the heat so it won't ruin your production?

                                                                                                                       

Music

 

Co-creating a Fanbase with Music Curation and What Artists Can Learn From Bloggers - Hypebot.com

Sharing and cross-promotion can help you build your fanbase.

 

What Are the Benefits of Listening to Music? -Musician Makers

Music matters on so many different levels.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - July 12, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - July 5, 2013

2,042 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, music, film, indie, movies, writers, blogging, writing, films, filmmakers, social_media, film_location
0

Last week, I attended CraftFest and ThrillerFest VIII, an annual event hosted by the International Thriller Writers (ITW) in New York City. Hundreds of writers packed the educational sessions that featured tips from bestselling authors and experts. Here are some things I learned about writing and marketing:

 

From Steve Berry, author of The King's Deception

  • Every single story must have structure. The beginning, middle, and end are equally important.
  • The beginning (Act 1) should be 20% of the book. In it, you establish character, conflict, and the crucible (the thing that gets a character to do what they'd otherwise never do).
  • The middle (Act 2) is 60% of the book. It should be a series of complications.
  • The end (Act 3) is 20% of the book. It includes the crisis point (the moment when everything comes to a peak) and the conclusion.

 

From Michael Connelly, author of The Black Box & The Lincoln Lawyer

  • If you want to write series fiction, forget about writing a series and just focus on writing one book. If you concentrate on not sowing seeds for future books, those seeds will be sown anyway.
  • If you have momentum as a writer, the reader will have momentum with your passages.
  • The history you create for your character will help you create future books. Layer in the character's past to plant seeds for your series (but don't get bogged down with backstory).
  • The best part of writing is that first draft, but then you have to assess what you have. Rewriting really makes books come together.

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The team with Michael Connelly

 

From David Morrell, author of Murder as a Fine Art & First Blood

  • Be a first rate version of yourself and not a second-rate version of another author.
  • Writing is a vocation, not a profession.
  • For setting, choose a location and mine it for everything it can give to you. Forget about sight and concentrate on feeling. When someone says writing is one-dimensional or flat, it's because the writer is relying too much on sight, almost like looking at an image on a movie screen. If you incorporate two other senses, you'll create more textured details and make readers feel like they're more in the setting.

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David Morrell signs books

 

From Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child, authors of Two Graves

  • Getting a writing partner is like getting married; that's where the real work begins. (D.P.)
  • Find a writing partner whose experience, knowledge, talent and discipline matches your own. (L.C.)
  • You need to be able to take criticism and have a thick skin. Check your ego at the door. (L.C.)
  • Rather than assigning chapters, assign sequences to each other. Then you can merge them and revise so there's no change in prose style and they're seamless.
  • With a writing partner, divide everything 50/50. But you'll always FEEL like you're doing three-quarters of the work. (D.P.)

 

From Leonardo Wild, author of Artificial Self

  • When you are writing, you should analyze what subtext you'll be bringing out in your turning points. You can achieve subtext by microdetailing, omission, or hinting.

 

From M.J. Rose, author of Seduction

  • No book is dead anymore. Every book is new to a reader who's never heard of it.

 

From C.J. Lyons, author of Blind Faith, winner of ITW's Best eBook Original Novel award

  • Every author has the chance to become the CEO of his or her own global publishing empire.
  • Here's the secret: Write a great book. Give your readers time to find it and tell their friends. Repeat.

 

From Kristen Lamb, author of Rise of the Machines: Human Authors in a Digital World

  • If you're a novelist, you're a storyteller. "High-concept" blogging is universal, emotional, and it gives the reader something to contribute or take away. It has a higher potential to go viral than just posting about the writing process or "buy my book." You'll also be able to reach past the small pool of avid readers into the much larger pool of people who read more casually.
  • With a blog, you're creating something personal, emotional, and becoming a friend. If you can hook someone with a 500-word blog, it's not a stretch that you'll hook them for 50,000.

 

From Meryl Moss, founder/president of Meryl Moss Media Relations

  • Figure out how the material in your book relates to what people are passionate about out in the world. That's what you should blog about.
  • When marketing, build from the inside. Getting your regional audience excited about your book is still a good idea.

 

From Douglas E. Richards, author of Wired

  • People think that giving books away means less sales, but that's not true. You never run out of purchasers, and those people will lead to word of mouth. Everybody doesn't have to love your book, but the people who do must love it so passionately that they tell all their friends about it.

 

From Dana Kaye, publicist

  • When reaching out to the media, you should be thinking creatively. There are more ways to pitch yourself than just saying you're an author. Don't dismiss your background, hobbies, or day job - they're interesting and could be media pitches.

 

From Kathleen Murphy, media specialist

  • Get to the point within a couple seconds when working with the media. They won't have time to read long emails.
  • Video and audio is where everything is going on social media, especially video. The media and readers need to hear and see you.

 

It was great fun seeing so many authors networking, sharing stories, learning from one another, and getting advice from bestsellers. You may want to consider joining a similar organization that gives you the chance to collaborate with your peers. Next up, you'll find us at the Romance Writers of America conference in Atlanta July 17-19 and the Pacific Northwest Writers Association conference in Seattle July 25-27.

 

Are you part of any writing organizations?

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-Amanda

Amanda is the editor of CreateSpace's educational resources and social media channels.

 

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The London Book Fair, Starring Authors

BEA Part of It: Book Expo America Session Takeaways

2,152 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, author, promotion, writers, writing, craft, social_media, trade_show, conference, thrillerfest, craftfest
8

Reviews are an important element of a book-marketing campaign, but some authors exercise poor judgment in securing them. Here are my thoughts on where they go wrong, as well as some suggestions for how to do it right:

 

DON'T ask friends and family to post reviews.

 

An author's loved ones would never say anything negative about her book. How would you feel if you bought a book based on its glowing reviews, then found out they had been planted by the author's friends and family? I would feel cheated, and I imagine you would too. So don't do that for your own book.

 

DON'T trade reviews with other indie authors.

 

This is a bad idea because it puts both authors into an awkward position. If Author A thinks Author B's book is terrible, is Author A really going to skewer Author B's book? Of course not. Reviews need to be completely objective to be credible, and the nature of this arrangement keeps that from happening.

 

DO reach out to prolific reviewers who have posted reviews of books in your genre.

 

It may take some digging, but you can find them. For example, many reviewers on Amazon list their contact information in their profiles.

 

DO ask readers who proactively tell you they enjoyed your book to write a review.

 

If someone takes the time to contact you with positive feedback about your book, by all means, ask him to put his thoughts into an honest review. It would never occur to many fans to post a review, so if they reach out to you, there is nothing wrong with suggesting they share their feedback with a public audience.

 

For any review system to maintain credibility, the reviews must be objective. That doesn't mean they will all be positive, but at least they will be honest, and that is more important. For more tips on getting reviews for an indie book, check out my webinar on book marketing at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Amazon General Review Creation Guidelines

To Be a Professional Writer, Make a Professional Impression

10,789 Views 8 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions, book_reviews
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We have defined the term "evergreen" on this blog, but for those of you who need a quick refresher, it simply means that because of the digital environment, your book will never go out of print unless you choose to take it off the market. Indie authors are the benefactors of a segment of the publishing industry that no longer requires inventory in order for a book to be made available for purchase.

 

Why is that significant? It gives you the potential to earn passive income forever. "Passive" may be a little misleading because it suggests that you aren't required to do anything to sell books. I suppose technically that is true; you may sell a few books by doing nothing, but it takes something akin to a miracle for that to happen. By passive, I mean you aren't required to take a single order, package your book or ship it. That is all done for you. Your only job is to put your entrepreneurial energy into marketing and branding. Do you see the possibilities? This isn't a fleeting, get-rich-quick, money-making scheme. This is a long-lasting, income-generating opportunity. The more you participate, the greater your possibilities of success.

 

So the message here is don't treat the publication of a book like a sprint. This isn't about getting the word out about your book weeks before publication and then putting a lot of time and effort into creating buzz for a relatively short period after it hits the market. You are engaged in an endless marathon. This is about building a brand for yourself as an author with a growing catalog of books available for sale. In the film version of Glengarry Glen Ross, there's a memorable scene where the salesmen are taught the ABCs of sales. It turns out ABC is an acronym for Always Be Closing. I would like to impart upon you a similar sentiment.

 

In order to truly harness the potential of a passive-income environment, you have to consistently build your brand. It is something you never stop doing. You should Always Be Branding!

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Passive Marketing is Important Too

Book Marketing Takes Persistence

2,649 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, branding
1

I receive a lot of email messages from authors who read my blog. Many of them believe they have the next big thing in literature on their hands, so they reach out to me in hopes that I will spread the word. Unfortunately, however, their emails often lend the impression that their books are most likely not very good, or they don't inspire me to get the word out. Here are three reasons why:

 

1. THEY WRITE THEIR EMAILS IN ALL CAPS.

When you send someone an email in all caps, no matter what you write, IT COMES ACROSS AS SHOUTING. End of story. And right or wrong, this creates a negative impression. Nobody likes to open emails and feel as if someone is yelling at them.

 

2. They use an unprofessional email address.

I always suggest that authors use a professional email address, e.g. john@johnsmith.com. When I receive an email from flirtygirl107@aol.com, it is hard to take the sender seriously. For contacting your friends or family, use whatever account you want. But if you're reaching out to strangers and asking them to take you seriously as a writer, a professional address makes a much better impression.

 

3. They spell my name wrong.

My name is Maria Murnane, and my email address is maria@mariamurnane.com. However, I get a lot of emails that begin with "Hi Marie" or "Hi Ms. Murname." The senders who do this lose me before I even read their messages. How can I think of them as amazing writers with well-edited books and good attention to detail if they don't even check that they have written my name correctly?

 

These are basic but important things to keep in mind the next time you're conducting email outreach for your book. It's usually the small things that make the biggest impressions!

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Why Good Grammar Matters

Just Say No to Random Capitalization!

2,820 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writers, promotions, impression
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