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458 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
8

Reviews are an important element of a book-marketing campaign, but some authors exercise poor judgment in securing them. Here are my thoughts on where they go wrong, as well as some suggestions for how to do it right:

 

DON'T ask friends and family to post reviews.

 

An author's loved ones would never say anything negative about her book. How would you feel if you bought a book based on its glowing reviews, then found out they had been planted by the author's friends and family? I would feel cheated, and I imagine you would too. So don't do that for your own book.

 

DON'T trade reviews with other indie authors.

 

This is a bad idea because it puts both authors into an awkward position. If Author A thinks Author B's book is terrible, is Author A really going to skewer Author B's book? Of course not. Reviews need to be completely objective to be credible, and the nature of this arrangement keeps that from happening.

 

DO reach out to prolific reviewers who have posted reviews of books in your genre.

 

It may take some digging, but you can find them. For example, many reviewers on Amazon list their contact information in their profiles.

 

DO ask readers who proactively tell you they enjoyed your book to write a review.

 

If someone takes the time to contact you with positive feedback about your book, by all means, ask him to put his thoughts into an honest review. It would never occur to many fans to post a review, so if they reach out to you, there is nothing wrong with suggesting they share their feedback with a public audience.

 

For any review system to maintain credibility, the reviews must be objective. That doesn't mean they will all be positive, but at least they will be honest, and that is more important. For more tips on getting reviews for an indie book, check out my webinar on book marketing at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Amazon General Review Creation Guidelines

To Be a Professional Writer, Make a Professional Impression

10,705 Views 8 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions, book_reviews
0

We have defined the term "evergreen" on this blog, but for those of you who need a quick refresher, it simply means that because of the digital environment, your book will never go out of print unless you choose to take it off the market. Indie authors are the benefactors of a segment of the publishing industry that no longer requires inventory in order for a book to be made available for purchase.

 

Why is that significant? It gives you the potential to earn passive income forever. "Passive" may be a little misleading because it suggests that you aren't required to do anything to sell books. I suppose technically that is true; you may sell a few books by doing nothing, but it takes something akin to a miracle for that to happen. By passive, I mean you aren't required to take a single order, package your book or ship it. That is all done for you. Your only job is to put your entrepreneurial energy into marketing and branding. Do you see the possibilities? This isn't a fleeting, get-rich-quick, money-making scheme. This is a long-lasting, income-generating opportunity. The more you participate, the greater your possibilities of success.

 

So the message here is don't treat the publication of a book like a sprint. This isn't about getting the word out about your book weeks before publication and then putting a lot of time and effort into creating buzz for a relatively short period after it hits the market. You are engaged in an endless marathon. This is about building a brand for yourself as an author with a growing catalog of books available for sale. In the film version of Glengarry Glen Ross, there's a memorable scene where the salesmen are taught the ABCs of sales. It turns out ABC is an acronym for Always Be Closing. I would like to impart upon you a similar sentiment.

 

In order to truly harness the potential of a passive-income environment, you have to consistently build your brand. It is something you never stop doing. You should Always Be Branding!

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Passive Marketing is Important Too

Book Marketing Takes Persistence

2,597 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, branding
1

I receive a lot of email messages from authors who read my blog. Many of them believe they have the next big thing in literature on their hands, so they reach out to me in hopes that I will spread the word. Unfortunately, however, their emails often lend the impression that their books are most likely not very good, or they don't inspire me to get the word out. Here are three reasons why:

 

1. THEY WRITE THEIR EMAILS IN ALL CAPS.

When you send someone an email in all caps, no matter what you write, IT COMES ACROSS AS SHOUTING. End of story. And right or wrong, this creates a negative impression. Nobody likes to open emails and feel as if someone is yelling at them.

 

2. They use an unprofessional email address.

I always suggest that authors use a professional email address, e.g. john@johnsmith.com. When I receive an email from flirtygirl107@aol.com, it is hard to take the sender seriously. For contacting your friends or family, use whatever account you want. But if you're reaching out to strangers and asking them to take you seriously as a writer, a professional address makes a much better impression.

 

3. They spell my name wrong.

My name is Maria Murnane, and my email address is maria@mariamurnane.com. However, I get a lot of emails that begin with "Hi Marie" or "Hi Ms. Murname." The senders who do this lose me before I even read their messages. How can I think of them as amazing writers with well-edited books and good attention to detail if they don't even check that they have written my name correctly?

 

These are basic but important things to keep in mind the next time you're conducting email outreach for your book. It's usually the small things that make the biggest impressions!

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Why Good Grammar Matters

Just Say No to Random Capitalization!

2,774 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writers, promotions, impression
1

I often hear from authors who are frustrated because they aren't getting much traction with their book marketing efforts. However, when I dig deeper, I usually discover that their "efforts" haven't amounted to all that much. They just don't realize it.

 

Here's an example: a very nice man wrote a book about Jewish history, and he wanted to speak at synagogues to help promote it. He conducted an outreach campaign but said he got very little response and was quite discouraged. When I asked him for details about what exactly he'd done, he said he had emailed five rabbis and that two had expressed tentative interest and would let him know. Nearly two months had passed, and he hadn't heard from them again.

 

His strategy was a good one, but he made two big mistakes in his execution:

 

1)    Contacting five synagogues is not enough!

 

When I was an indie author, I contacted hundreds of organizations about my book. Only a small fraction got back to me, but over time I was successful because I cast such a wide net and kept at it. If I had stopped at the first five, I certainly wouldn't be where I am today. Just like sales, book marketing is often a numbers game.

 

2)    It's up to the author to follow up.

 

Even if two of the five rabbis expressed interested (and 40 percent is actually a great response rate), it is highly unlikely that either of them will get back in touch. Why? Because they are busy. People are busy, and despite their best intentions, the vast majority of them will flake if you leave things to them. It is critical to understand this. They may indeed be interested in whatever you are proposing, but it is up to you to keep the ball rolling.

 

If you keep at it over time, you'll be more successful in your efforts. I promise!

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

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Passive Marketing is Important Too

Marketing: Begin with Your Strengths

8,529 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, marketing, author, promotions, branding
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

What's the 3-Step Process to Marketing Your Book? - BadRedhead Media

A book release strategy from the 'marketing' point of view.

                                                    

21 Ways to Launch a Successful Virtual Book Tour - The Future of Ink

Author D'vorah Lansky shares 21 articles that are the basis for her new book about virtual book tours.

 

Film

                                                        

How to Secure a Shooting Location -Filmmaker IQ

Watch as indie filmmakers set out to legally secure a location for their short film.

                                          

Are You Good In a Room? -Joke and Biagio                 

Just because you're an indie filmmaker doesn't mean you don't have to pitch your film.      

                                    

Music

 

Music Industry Networking Tips - Musicgoat

Sometimes success really does hinge on who you know.

 

Voices and Allergies...Practical Tips To Quell the Mucous Monsters - Judy Rodman

How to avoid letting that cold invade your music.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - June 7, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - May 31, 2013

2,064 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, film, networking, indie, movies, writers, business, writing, films, craft, filmmakers
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The PERFECT Hook - Author Culture

What are you promising your readers with your hook?

                                                    

5 Reasons to Admire Self-Publishing - Huffington Post

An article examining the independent spirit of the self-publishing community.

 

Film

                                                        

10 Films That Gave the Game Away Too Early -What Culture!

Can you spoil a good story by uncovering the mystery too soon?

                                          

The Philosophy of Filmmaking: Storytelling DNA -San Francisco School of Digital Filmmaking

Can making a film be both easy and impossible?

                                    

Music

 

The Essentials to Building a Successful Music Career - Musicgoat

Call them the five Ms of making it in music.

 

The Future of Direct-To-Fan Marketing - Hypebot.com

Experts in the music and tech industries discuss the coming advances in fan outreach tools.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - May 31, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - May 24, 2013

2,058 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, film, promotion, indie, movies, writers, blogging, films, musicians, craft, filmmakers
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Thankfully, we live in a world where the media has splintered into factions. I say "thankfully" because there's no longer a bottleneck blocking an indie author's access to media sources. Today there are a number of highly specialized new media organizations - including blogs and online review sites - that are effective vehicles for indie authors to get the word out about their books.

 

One of the best ways to spread the word about your book is through new media groups that do honest reviews of indie books. Here are five such sites with the genres they prefer to review. If you choose to contact one of these, remember they do not guarantee they will accept your book, and if they do, there's no guarantee they will like your book.

 

 

  • Ginger-Read Reviews: Young Adult, New Adult, Adult, Urban Fantasy, Paranormal Romance, Fantasy, Science Fiction, Horror
  • C9C Reviews: Thrillers (action, military, spy), Action/Adventure, Sci-Fi (space)
  • Big Al's Books and Pals: (Amazon eBooks) Any genre of Fiction, Non-fiction if general interest and targeted at a layperson
  • Books on The Knob: Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Mystery, and Suspense preferred, but considers other genres
  • Books Like Breathing: Romance, Young Adult (mainly paranormal romance), Historical Fiction (limited), Contemporary Fiction, Horror (limited), Memoirs/Biography (limited), Chick Lit, Cookbooks (especially about desserts)

 

Should any of these sites or others you can find on The Indie View agree to review your book, be sure to respect the reviewer's time and opinion. Some sites no longer accept books from authors because of negative treatment from those who did not get a favorable review. That's unfortunate, because we as a community should always conduct ourselves in a professional manner. Remember, reviews are subjective. As authors, we must be able to take constructive criticism gracefully, especially if it means we have a chance to learn and improve our books.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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How Not to Market

Find Smaller Markets to Sell More Books

5,235 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, writers, promotions, book_reviews
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How Winning a Literary Prize Can Change Your Life - The Book Deal

This discussion includes the winner of a self-published book award.

                                                    

7 Secrets to Writing Persuasive Back Cover Sales Copy - The Book Designer

Casey Demchak shares his expertise on writing great back cover book descriptions.

 

Film

                                                        

5 Things Every Filmmaker Should Know Before They Step on Set -backstage

Filmmaker Matthew Perkins believes knowing what you can't do is as important as knowing what you can do.

                                          

16 Big Marketing Ideas for Filmmakers on a Small Budget - Raindance Film Festival

Raindance Film Festival founder Elliot Grove shares his top marketing tips for independent filmmakers.

                                    

Music

 

Infographic: When Is the Best Time To Post On Social Media? - That Eric Alper

According to this infographic, if it's 2 p.m., you have an hour before prime tweeting time ends.

 

Could Flickr Become the Next Big Social Network for Musicians? - Hypebot.com

Is the landscape of social media shifting just a bit?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - May 24, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - May 17, 2013

1,577 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, music, filmmaking, production, movies, writers, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers, social_media
2

As a person with a working knowledge of marketing, I know the importance of identifying your demographic. You have to know which consumers will be interested in your product so you can find them and market to them. That's an easy enough concept to understand. You can't find the group of people you're looking for if you don't know who they are. 

 

Equally as important in this checkers game we call marketing: you have to know your product. If you don't know how to identify your product, you won't be able to identify your demographic. In the world of publishing, we've embraced the genre model in order for an author's work to be categorized and easily identifiable. This genre system allows authors to find readers and readers to find books. 

 

The problem is that authors don't always want to be pigeonholed and restricted to one specific genre. In a weird way, some authors may feel they aren't taken seriously as writers if they are too identifiable with a certain type of genre. We are artists, after all. We don't always like to be reduced to denizens of what can be perceived as formulaic writing.

 

I am of the opinion that you can be associated with a genre and be considered an excellent writer as well. In fact, most bestsellers become bestsellers because they not only succeed with readers of their genre, but they also reach a large group of readers outside the genre. The term for this type of book is a "genre-bending novel."

 

I've read many a genre-bending novel, and they all have one thing in common: they have deep, rich characters that jump off the page. You feel as if you could pass these people on the street they are so real. On top of that, they are fallible and compelling. If you want to succeed in a genre and transcend it at the same time, hone your character development skills and write a genre-bending novel.  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

  

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Show vs. Tell: Do You Know the Difference?

Elements of a Page-turner

2,570 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, writers, genre, craft, branding, character_development, target_audience
1

We hear the word "grassroots" used quite a bit in the world of advertising and marketing. It's a particularly favorite word of political campaigns because it gives the appearance of a movement based on passion, grit, and determination. Money is not the key ingredient of a grassroots marketing campaign. The will of the audience is the primary driving force.

 

Imagine throwing a stone into the water and then watching as the waves ripple out around the point of entry of the stone. That is what a grassroots marketing strategy used to look like. It was something that was restricted to a single location and the waves of popularity rippled out from there.

 

In our highly connected world, grassroots marketing is no longer restricted to a single location; it has gone global. Now imagine taking a handful of stones and tossing them into the water. You're left with dozens of entry points with dozens of waves moving across the water in every direction, some of them even overlapping.

 

That is what a grassroots marketing strategy looks like today. It's your social networking outreach. It's your blog activity. It's your personal video. It's your personal appearance. And it's your consistent interactivity with your friends, fans, and followers wherever you have a presence online.

 

You live in a time where it is easier than ever to build a readership, a time where there are no barriers. The only thing you need to do is demonstrate the passion, grit, and determination that are at the heart of a grassroots marketing strategy.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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How Not to Market

Find Smaller Markets to Sell More Books

19,144 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, grassroots
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Gut Check: How Bad Do You Want It? (Publishing Success, That Is!) - DuoLit

Succeeding as an indie author takes a lot of work and sacrifice.

                                                    

10 Things I Learned from Kickstarting My Book - Huffington Post

Author A.J. Walkley reveals how she raised $5,200 through crowdsourcing to launch her next book.

 

Film

                                                        

Very Independent Filmmaking - Supporting Your Habit - NoHo Art District

No financing? No worries. Your drive and creativity are your most important resources when it comes to making a film.

                                          

Zach Braff, Kickstarter, and Financing Your Film For Free - Filmmaking.net

If nothing else, Zach Braff proved that brand recognition is still king of the hill when it comes to raising funds for an independent film.

                                    

Music

 

5 Steps to Becoming a Music Producer - Musicgoat

No shortcuts here. Just sound advice on how to earn your stripes as a music producer the right way.

 

The Difference Between Mixing and Mastering - Musician Coaching

Industry insider Mark Christensen examines the art and business of music production.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - May 17, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - May 10, 2013

2,040 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, music, author, indie, movies, publishing, writing, promotions, music_marketing, musicians, music_production
3

How Not to Market

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 20, 2013

I spend quite a bit of time perusing websites and blogs that cater to indie authors. I'm always on the hunt for marketing ideas that will help catapult me into the upper stratosphere of book sales. Over the course of a few hours of searching, I usually find, at the very least, one or two strategies that are worth further investigation. I rarely come away bothered by a piece of advice, but I have to say this latest adventure into the world of marketing for indie authors left a bad taste in my mouth.

 

This marketing advice was not unethical. It won't sully an author's reputation should it be revealed he or she was using the strategy to sell books. It simply requires the author to abandon his or her style and preferred genre in order to capitalize on buying trends. The marketing expert in this case was recommending that authors examine a number of bestseller lists, find the types of books that appear there most often, and write a similar book.

 

What bothers me about that particular strategy? Call me naive or ultra-idealistic, but I believe writing should be done out of passion, not out of an effort to cash in on a trend. When authors write to chase the trend, they usually write without authenticity. Readers know when they're being pandered to, and those authors will probably leave them with an unfulfilling reading experience.

 

As in most areas of the entertainment culture, publishing trends are fleeting. By the time you finish your book that has the look and feel of the bestseller lists you checked weeks or months ago, there's a new trend on the horizon. You may have even wasted a lot of time on a type of book readers are now sick of seeing.

 

My advice? Write what moves you, not what you think moves readers. In the end, you'll have a book you'll be proud of and readers will enjoy.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Build Your Brand with Original Content

Catching the Vanishing Idea

4,270 Views 3 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, marketing, author, promotion, writers
3

Many writers make the mistake of thinking that bigger is better when it comes to defining a book's target audience. Logically, it seems to make sense: they want to sell as many books as they can, so they want to find the biggest pool of people to market to. That line of thinking is all about the numbers; the bigger the number, the bigger the opportunity to succeed. So the author designs a generic strategy in order to appeal to as many people as possible. They believe that if a potential reader is simply made aware of their book, then surely they'll take a chance and buy it.

 

But by choosing this "big pond" approach, those authors are being overlooked, and they're missing the opportunity to stand out in a smaller pond. What authors should do instead is look for ways to make their target audience smaller.

 

Find an element of your book that will resonate with a specific group of people and reach out to them. What you're looking for is a niche market. Dictionary.com defines niche market as "specialized and profitable part of a commercial market; a narrowly targeted market." The key word in that definition is "profitable."

 

An example of a niche market is fly fishing enthusiasts. Let&rss assume that you've written a murder mystery that features a protagonist who is a master fly fisherman. You'd be well-served to pursue fly fishing blogs, magazines, websites, clubs, etc. Let them know about your book. Offer them review copies. Let them know you're available for an interview, personal appearance, or whatever else they need.

 

You'll have much better success being a big fish in a small pond than a small fish in a big pond.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Passive Marketing is Important Too

It's Not Just a Hobby, It's a Marketing Opportunity

45,894 Views 3 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, distribution, sales
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The Lessons Music Business Can Teach Authors - Beyond the Book

Can you become a successful author without finding fame?

                                                    

How Fiction Authors Can Steal Marketing Ideas from Their Non-Fiction Friends -Duolit

          Nonfiction authors have the benefit of a built-in audience. Turns out, fiction authors do, too.            

 

Film

                                                        

Your Movie Facebook Fan Page Is Not Big Enough - Filmmaking Stuff

Succeeding in filmmaking goes beyond making a great film. It requires rabid fans.

                                          

10 Lessons on Filmmaking from Director Ken Loach - Filmmaker Magazine

You can't bring your ego when making a documentary; it has to be about the subject matter.            

                                    

Music

 

Don't Make This Music Publicity Blunder - Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

It's not about you; it's about who you're marketing to.       

 

For Music Discovery, Definition Often Varies - Hypebot.com

The way people find your music has changed drastically in the last few years.                 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - April 19, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - April 12, 2013

981 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, film, indie, movies, writers, promotions, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

What Inspires Authors to Write Their Novels? - Huffington Post

Author Wendy Webb looks for the muses among us. 

                                                    

Ten Ways Self-publishing Has Changed the Books World - The Guardian

How indie authors took control and changed the publishing game.

 

Film

                                                        

What Did Barry Levinson Say Is the Worst Thing a Filmmaker Could Do? - Making the Movie

The legendary filmmaker doesn't wait for the audience to catch up before he serves up the next joke.

                                          

How (Why) to Make a Movie - Ezine Articles

A filmmaker argues that you will always regret not making that film you always wanted to make.

                                    

Music

 

DIY Electronic Music Production Basics: Part 5 - Marketing - Musicgoat

Musician/producer Rick Lloyd draws on his experience to give some sage marketing advice.

 

How Much Money Do Viral Music Videos Make? - The Musicians Guide

A viral music video can create multiple streams of income.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - April 12, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - April 5, 2013

915 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, music, promotion, indie, movies, inspiration, musicians, craft, filmmakers, viral_video
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