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488 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
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Goodreads is a smart (and free) way for authors to reach avid readers. With 20 million members, 570 million books, and 24 million reviews, it is now the world's largest site for readers and book recommendations. Here are a few tips for how to use it:

 

  1. Create an author profile and include your book title(s), bio, headshot, website, Twitter handle, blog, etc.
  2. Run a giveaway. Giveaways are free to list and drive awareness of your book. You can run as many giveaways as you like for however many copies you want to provide. Even if winners don't post a review, they will likely add your book to their "To-Read" shelf, which will provide exposure for your book.
  3. Add the Goodreads widget to your website to let people know they can post reviews of your work there. Just like with Twitter and Facebook, you want to let readers know where to find you. Goodreads provides a variety of widgets to help you promote your books.
  4. Join groups and talk about books (not just your own). Goodreads members like to talk about what they're reading, and you can tap into that discussion by joining groups that interest you. Avoid excessive self-promotion, but feel free to express your opinion!
  5. Create an event and invite your friends and followers. You can create all kinds of events, including book signings, online chats, cover reveals, and book launches.
  6. Use your blog and the "status update" feature to keep fans informed about your books. You can import your blog from Blogger, Wordpress, Tumblr, or other blogging platforms.

 

Bonus advice: As I discussed in a previous post, I don't recommend commenting on reviews, especially negative ones. Bad reviews can actually improve the perception of your work, as it shows that real, unbiased people are reading it. Resist the temptation to dispute a poor review, but do flag it if it violates the Goodreads terms of service.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

 

 

 

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Watch for Errors in Marketing Materials

Tips for Promoting Your Book on Twitter

13,713 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, author, promotion, promotions, social_networking, social_media, marketing_strategy
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The Next Big Thing

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 4, 2013

"Be an early adopter." Taking that advice can be the key to finding unprecedented success in marketing because when you are one of the first to adopt the next big trend, you are then positioned to accompany that trend to the top. It's like being on the ground floor of a new business venture that turns out to be a game-changing enterprise.

 

The trick is to know which "next big thing" really is the next big thing. There are new social media sites popping up constantly. Some come and go before anyone takes notice. Others reach the stratosphere and carve out their own little spot in the social media universe. There's no way to know for sure which ones will take off, but if you make it point to visit some of the trend-watching sites listed below on a regular basis, you'll have a great chance of finding "the one" that will help you take your brand to the next level.

 

  • Mashable- Founded by Pete Cashmore in 2005, Mashable is the go-to news source for all things social media. It is one of the best trend-watching tools out there today.

  • TechCrunch- This site prides itself on finding and reporting on new technology start-ups and breaking news in the tech industry.

  • ReadWriteWeb- Founded in 2003 by Richard MacManus, the site is one of the oldest to cover tech news in the age of social media.

 

There are others of course. You can find a fairly comprehensive list by visiting moreofit. Pick a time out of every day to spend 15 minutes perusing a few of these sites and you just might become an early adopter of the next big trend in social media.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Today's New Media

Six-Second Branding with Apps

7,921 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, self-publishing, promotions, mashable, techcrunch, readwriteweb
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Today's New Media

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 28, 2013

I hear the word "media" used a great deal these days, more so than in my younger and more impressionable days. When talking of marketing in the past, there didn't seem to be an obsession with what type of media a particular organization represented. There weren't groups, subgroups, and subgroups of subgroups of media. There was just THE media, as in the press, and the one general word was sufficient for describing most of it.

 

Now, there's mainstream media, alternative media, online media, etc. Media has broken off into more specialized forms. When you're trying to market a book, it might be useful to identify the types of media that are available to you. Here, I've focused on three types of media you can pursue to get coverage for you and your books:

 

  1. Mainstream media - Something becomes mainstream when it is widely known and utilized. I don't limit this particular group to offline organizations like electronic news networks and the print industry because they all have enormous online footprints these days. Sure, mainstream media includes The Wall Street Journal, NBC Nightly News, CNN, etc., but it also includes sites like The Huffington Post, Yahoo!, and other online-only organizations. They are oft-quoted and linked to via social networks. Because they have such a big presence, it can be difficult for indie authors to get coverage in these types of outlets, but it's not impossible.

  2. Specialized media - This is a subset of the media that has a smaller presence than its mainstream counterparts, but it still caters to a large group of people. These are specialized media groups that usually focus on one specific topic. Writer's Digest is a good example of this type of organization. That is a publication that focuses on all-things-writing. There are hundreds of specialized media organizations out there today. If you have a book that features a specific topic or passion, there's a fairly good chance you can get coverage with one of these outlets.

  3. Enthusiast media - These are your bloggers. In most cases, they don't have a formal media background, and many don't consider themselves part of the media, but they are. They disseminate information to a reading audience, and they usually do so with a great deal of zeal. Like specialized media, bloggers more often than not focus on one or maybe a couple topics of interest. This is where you're going to get the best return on investment of your time. Bloggers are hungry to discover the next greatest thing - your book could be that thing!

 

Getting the attention of the media is something you should be trying to do as part of your indie author marketing plan. It can be hard work, but with all the different types of media out there today, you have more opportunities than ever before to reach new audiences.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Six-Second Branding with Apps

Book Marketing: Have You Tapped Your Network?

4,244 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, writing, media, promotions
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Grab, Delight or Shock Your Readers Right from the Start -The Book Deal

We're going to need a bigger hook.

                                       

Book Marketing 101: Sell the Benefits NOT the Product -Self Publishing Coach

A rather unusual take on how to sell a book.

 

Film

                                                        

How to Make Your Horror Screenplay More Effective - No Film School

'Tis the season to get your horror thinking cap on!

 

6 Filmmaking Tips from Ron Howard - Film School Rejects

You can learn a lot from a man with a catalog of blockbuster hits like Ron Howard.

                                    

Music

 

What Does a Music Producer Even Do? - Musicgoat.com

A great explanation of a music producer's role.

 

How to Warm Up Your Singing Voice -RouteNote Blog

A video tutorial featuring opera singer Danielle de Niese.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - October 18, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - October 11, 2013

 

2,641 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, selling, music, filmmaking, author, movies, writers, writing, fiction, musicians, screenwriting, filmmakers, branding, social_media, music_production
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Build Subplots from Multiple Viewpoints -Writer's Digest

How many subplots is too many subplots?         

 

How Much Time Do You Need To Write? -Catherine, Caffeinated

Do you need the whole day to write for an hour?

 

Film

 

18 Writing Exercises to Improve the Quality of Your Script - Filmmaker IQ

Can lessons learned in a poetry group help you write a better script?

 

Disney's Lucasfilm Says Filmmakers Will Soon Be Using Video Game Engines

- Minyanville

Will special effects soon be done in real time and eliminate the need for extensive postproduction?

                                    

Music

 

Singing Multiple Sets? Beware What You Do Between Shows! - Judy Rodman

Resting between sets can save your voice.

 

How to Get More Click-Throughs and Retweets on Twitter -Hypebot.com

There is an art and science to tweeting. Dan Zarella cracks open Twitter and examines how to best use it.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - October 11, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - October 4, 2013

3,298 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, indie, video, writing, films, twitter, musicians, filmmakers, social_media, point_of_view, writing_exercises
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After speaking at a conference a few weeks ago, I met an author who had done something quite smart to promote his novel: He created a bookmark about it. The front had the cover, title and his name, and the back included a brief plot description, the author's email address and website, and where to buy the book.

 

The bookmark included a lot of great information, and overall it looked very professional. Unfortunately, it also included a grammatical error that jumped out at me and overshadowed everything else. The error also caught the trained eye of a fellow panelist who works in the publishing industry. (For those who are curious, the author had mixed up "lay" and "lie," an oft-confused word pair addressed here.)

 

By not catching this error before his marketing materials went to print, the author inadvertently gave the impression that he doesn't focus heavily on grammar and editing, a trait that could carry over into his book. That is probably the furthest thing from the truth, but in marketing, perception is often reality. Catching grammatical errors or typos before producing marketing materials will not only ensure you create a positive impression, but it can save you the time and monetary costs of a reprint.

 

Try to learn from this author's mistake. When you're putting together materials for promoting your work, be sure to get multiple sets of eyes on them to make sure they are perfect before pulling the trigger. To be on the safe side, you may even want to get your editor to read over your text. You only get one chance to make a first impression, so you want it to be your best.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Why Good Grammar Matters

Everyone Needs an Editor!

6,678 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Find the Perfect Names for Your Characters -Writer's Digest

Naming a character may require a little trip around the world.

                                       

Wish You Had a Few Extra Hours in the Day? Hire an Author Assistant! -BadRedhead Media

Hiring an assistant is not as outrageous as it sounds.

 

Film

 

How to Shoot a Film with a Skeleton Crew - Noam Kroll

Two words every independent filmmaker knows too well: skeleton crew.

 

Two Types of Sound in the Movies - A MOON BROTHERS Film Blog

Do you know the difference between Diegetic Sound and Non-Diegetic Sound?

                                    

Music

 

How Film Music Shapes Narrative - OUP Blog

Music can make or break the success of a film.

 

Is Music Really Getting Sadder? -The Echo Nest

Do more minor keys in hit songs mean that music is getting sadder?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - October 4, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - September 27, 2013

3,098 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, movies, writers, publishing, characters, films, musicians, filmmakers, social_media
1

Can You Do More?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 7, 2013

If you're not selling as many books as you envisioned you would, the answer isn't to give up on your dream. The answer is to sit down and ask yourself a series of tough questions that may help you pinpoint where you went wrong, or if you went wrong. Here are the top questions you should ask yourself.

 

  • Is your cover holding you back? Even in this world of eBooks and online shopping, covers matter. A poorly made cover or a cover that doesn't adequately represent your genre can sink sales.
  • Is your book description just a summary? Book descriptions shouldn't be approached as a chance to summarize your story. Book descriptions should be looked at as a chance for you to sell your books. If you didn't write it with your marketing hat on, chances are it's not hitting the mark. Get your power words out, and get to work rewriting it. See my tips on book descriptions here.
  • Did you pick the right genre? Perhaps you're not totally clear on what kind of book you've written. Or you may even feel that your book is so versatile that it's not fair to limit it to just one or two genres. But do yourself a favor, and narrow your genre identification down to no more than two. It will be much easier to find and attract readers if you clearly define the book you've written.
  • Are you actively marketing? If you're sitting back and waiting for sales, there's a better-than-good chance those sales won't come. Get on the social media wheel and start running. Blog your heart out, and turn on that video camera. You've got some marketing to do. Check out Marketing Central for some ideas.

 

A little self-examination never hurt anyone. If book sales are less than stellar, you owe it to yourself to do all you can to sell more books. If you don't want to do it for yourself, do it for all those readers who are missing out!

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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What is Your Pivot Point?

Make Your Brand Engaging

9,217 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, sales
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Making Your Book Attractive for Book Clubs -Duolit

Getting noticed by a book club isn't easy, but Stephen McCutchan shares some tips that helped him do just that.                                                     

                                       

7 Questions to Ask Before You Write a Nonfiction Book -The BookBaby Blog

Bobbi Linkemer dishes out her advice on writing a nonfiction book.

 

Film

 

Filmmaking: Making a Little Go Further - Business 2 Community

How independent filmmakers stretch a dollar.

 

Indie Beat: The Road to Sustainable Filmmaking - Twitch

Have the worlds of raising financing and finding an audience merged?

                                    

Music

 

Hey Musicians, Does Crowd Size Matter? - Musicgoat

Do you need the room to be packed in order to play your best?

 

Silence vs. Playing -Ashley Saunders

Not playing a note is just as important as playing a note when it comes to music.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 27, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - September 20, 2013

2,357 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, music, filmmaking, film, indie, movies, writers, writing, nonfiction, films, musicians, craft, filmmakers, social_media, book_clubs
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

4 Reasons You Need a Business Plan for Your Book - Writer's Digest

Embrace the entrepreneur inside of you.

 

The Secret to Writing Faster -Backspace

Could the secret to writing faster be ditching technology?

 

Film

 

5 Tips for Creating Your Own Film or Series - backstage

It takes a team to make a film.

 

Joss Whedon on Filmmaking - BAFTA - Filmmaker IQ

From Buffy to The Avengers, Joss Whedon has proven he knows his stuff.

                                    

Music

 

3 Surprising Reasons House Concerts Are Great For Selling Merch and Making New Fans - Musicgoat

It might be time to invite a few hundred of your closest friends over and have a party.

 

Busy Voices: Quick Tabata Exercise for Physical Stamina -Judy Rodman

One must exercise the entire body to keep one's voice physically fit.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 20, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - September 13, 2013

3,170 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, film, author, movies, writers, writing, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media
2

One of the first things I ask people about when I give workshops on book marketing is their networks. Oftentimes, authors reply with, "I don't have one." But that's not true, because everyone has some sort of network. Here are some ways to find yours:

 

1. Where did you go to school?

 

Tap into high school and college alumni networks on Facebook and LinkedIn. There are also tons of regional college alumni clubs out there, as well as national college alumni magazines, and all of them would be interested to hear that you're an author. For those organizations that have newsletters, provide the editor with a brief description of your book, a high-resolution cover image, a short author bio, and your headshot. Also, be sure to note what your connection is with that particular institution. You'd be surprised where that might lead. If you were in a fraternity or sorority, the Greek system also has strong alumni networks.

 

2. How do you spend your free time?

 

Everyone has at least one hobby! Do you play a sport? An instrument? Do you sing? Knit? Paint? Quilt? Are you in any social or business networking groups? Whatever it is that you do when you're not working, there are organizations filled with like-minded individuals. Many of them will have newsletters that would appreciate hearing from you, especially if your book has something to do with their field of interest. A simple internet search can get you started. Meetup.com is another way to find people who share your interests.

 

3. What is your heritage?

 

Are you an immigrant? Were you born in the United States but have parents who weren't? Are you Greek-American? Irish-American? Indian-American? Whatever your bloodline or personal history, there are groups out there full of people with similar backgrounds, so get online and start reaching out!

 

4. Where do you work/have you worked?

 

LinkedIn is a great way to track down former colleagues. If you've worked with a group of people, the simple fact that you've written a book is newsworthy, so be sure to tell them.

 

Marketing a book takes effort, and your networks are a good place to start. You already have something in common with those audiences, so it'll be easier to make a connection that could add to your readership.

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Book Marketing Tip: Hold On to Your Contacts

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

10,112 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, writers, promotions, social_networking, social_media, marketing_strategy, fanbase
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

4 Ways to Cultivate Fan Activists to Help with Word of Mouth Marketing -Marketing Tips

Author and branding expert Eric Thomas reveals his secrets to finding superfans who love spreading the word.                                                    

 

In Book Marketing, Sometimes Less is More! -Self Publishing Coach

Author AFN Clarke discusses his experience with advertising his books.

 

Film

 

Film School Thru Commentaries - Filmmaking.net

Kevin Smith explores who does and doesn't need to go to film school in the world of filmmaking.

 

5 Things You Should Know About DSLR Film Making - Raindance

Meet the camera that is changing independent filmmaking.

                                    

Music

 

#10 Change with Bob Baker - #BBTD

Music marketing guru Bob Baker talks succeeding, failing, and all the hurdles in between.

 

Great Advice from Sting's Guitarist -Ashley J. Saunders

Dominic Miller discusses the proper way to hold a guitar.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 13, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - September 6, 2013

3,329 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, movies, writers, publishing, writing, book_marketing, films, musicians, filmmakers, social_media
0

You have readers, but do you have a volunteer sales force? Readers who enjoyed your books may want to be part of your word-of-mouth campaign, but you might not be giving them the tools to do so. Time to give them calls to action, which can elicit passive or active responses:

 

1. Invite Readers to Sign Up for Updates (Passive)

This call to action invites readers to sign up to learn more about you and your work. On your blog or website, you should have a highly visible button that directs them to an online form, email address, or social media group where they can sign up to receive updates from you. If they are part of a social media environment, you'll want to reach out frequently, even if it's just a quote of the day. If you've set up an email newsletter, your updates won't be as frequent, but you'll still be reaching them about author and/or book activity on a semi-regular basis.

 

This is a common practice in the world of marketing, so you're not reinventing the wheel. You're just enabling readers to continue connecting with you after they've closed your book.

 

2. Invite Readers to Spread the Word (Active)

This call to action is for readers you'd call "superfans." They're the ones who will sign up to spread the word about your books (your "street team," if you will). A call to action for them would be an invitation to join your word-of-mouth campaign.

 

These readers are your volunteer sales force, so give them information about how they can help. Making a personal appearance? Ask these fans to spread the word, particularly if they live in the area where you will be appearing. Released a new video book trailer? Ask your team to share it with their friends and followers. New book coming out? Tell them how they can help to get the word out. Your goal is to make it easy for those readers who want to be part of your team to take action.

 

Remember to regularly thank these superfans for their dedication. You could offer other rewards as well. Perhaps they could be beta readers for your next book, or you could offer them signed copies of your books. The point is to make them feel special for being part of your inner circle and helping you out.

 

One or both of these calls to action will give readers an opportunity to get more involved with you and your books. Have you given your fans that call to action?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Find Advocates with Free Books

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

7,242 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, writers, promotions, fans, social_media, marketing_strategy
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

5 Steps for Restarting Your Book Marketing Efforts after a Break -Duolit

What to do when building your brand has taken a backseat to living your life.

                                       

Goodreads for Authors with Patrick Brown -The Creative Penn

The director of author marketing and community manager at Goodreads shares some valuable insights for authors about the online community of readers.

 

Film

 

The New Marketing Model for Filmmakers - AdPulp.com

A look at the world of online media for filmmakers that goes beyond YouTube.

 

Equity Crowdfunding, a New Financing Opportunity for Independent Filmmakers - Filmlinker

Is this a viable new financing strategy for independent filmmakers?

                                    

Music

 

The War of Art: Resistance and the Music Producer - Renegade Producer

How to battle that little voice in your head that's trying to hold you back from taking chances.

 

How Streaming Affects Music Revenue Growth -Hypebot.com

Are the latest music streaming statistics signaling a growth in music revenue?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 6, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - August 30, 2013

3,074 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, marketing, book, music, self-publishing, indie, movies, writers, publishing, writing, films, promotions, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media, crowdsourcing
2

Claim Your Genre

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 9, 2013

Have you fully embraced your genre? Have you established yourself as a go-to source in your genre? When a reader is looking for a reliable opinion or information about a book in your genre, is there a chance that reader will turn to you or stumble upon your brand because of your status as an expert or enthusiast?

 

If you answered no to one or more of the questions above, you might be selling yourself short and missing an opportunity to solidify your author brand. But don't worry - it's never too late to become a central figure in your selected genre. All you have to do is raise your profile. Here are a few suggestions to do just that.

 

  1. Review books in your genre - You are most likely an avid reader in the genre in which you write, and there are undoubtedly authors and books you love. Tell the world with a killer review. Share your opinions as if your brand depends on it.

  2. Review authors in your genre - You have a platform. Use that platform to showcase your favorite authors. You can do an email interview; set up a Skype interview; or if the author is nearby, grab your camera and head over to his or her writing spot to do an interview you can upload to a video sharing site.

  3. Turn your blog over to authors in your genre - Invite both new and established authors to do a guest post on your blog. Give them a theme to write about, provide them with a short introductory paragraph, and then let them do what they do best: write. Chances are they'll reciprocate. Authors who support one another tend to have more success.

 

Be that guy! Be the one readers look to for reliable information on your genre. If you increase the prominence of your brand in your genre, you raise both your own stature as an author and that of your books.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Expand Your Reach by Teaching

Make Your Brand Engaging

5,859 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions, genre
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