Skip navigation
1 ... 12 13 14 15 16 ... 34 Previous Next

Resources

506 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
0

Blurb with Caution

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Mar 10, 2014

At one time in my life, there was a particular author that I read religiously. As soon as I finished one of his books, I raced to buy his next book or find an old book of his that I had not yet read. I was crazy about this author. Quite simply, he was my favorite writer. On one occasion, when I had no more of his books to read, I picked up random titles in the same genre and flipped through the pages to find something that grabbed my attention. This went on for far too long. I just couldn't find something that pulled me in until I started reading some of the blurbs. Lo and behold, right there between two quotation marks was a glowing endorsement by my favorite author. If the book was good enough for him, it was good enough for me. I bought the book, took it home and cracked it open, ready to be whisked away on a magical fictional journey.

 

 

Two chapters in, I hated the book. It was nothing like my favorite author had promised it would be. I read other reviews online, and most agreed with me. I went in search of another book and found another one endorsed by my favorite author. I didn't like that one either. Turns out my favorite author didn't have a similar taste to mine...or he was being less than honest in his blurbs.

 

Fast forward to the release of his next book - I had no interest in reading it. His blurbs for less-than-deserving books somehow ruined my excitement for his own books. I can't explain it. I just felt like he had violated a sacred trust between reader and scribe. He used his brand to sell bad writing that wasn't even his.

 

 

Consider this a precautionary tale. While it is incredibly flattering to be asked for a blurb by a fellow author, make sure you are endorsing something you truly believe in, and the book is worthy of being associated with your brand. Anything less and you run the risk of tarnishing your own brand and losing readers.

 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

Sell Yourself as an Enthusiast

A Few Indie Book Review Media Sources

3,153 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, blurbs
0

If your biggest fans aren't authors themselves, there's a good chance they have no idea how much you need their help to spread the word about your work. So why not tell them? I created a "buzz" page on my website. It lists easy ways to spread the word about my novels, and anytime I interact with fans on a personal level, I ask them to check out that page.

Here are some examples:

 

1)  My newsletter: Anytime someone signs up for my monthly newsletter, I reply with a personal note asking why they chose to do so. Many are aspiring authors looking for writing and marketing advice, but just as many say they signed up because they love my books. If they're fans, I tell them how important word-of-mouth is and how much I would appreciate their help. For example, I suggest they post something about my books on Facebook. It's important to make it as easy as possible for your fans to take action.

2)  Goodreads: When people begin to "follow" me on Goodreads I also send them a personal note and follow the same protocol as with the newsletter. Most people who follow me on Goodreads are voracious readers and love to share what they are reading with others. They also love hearing from authors!

3)  Twitter: If I see that I have a new follower, I repeat the same protocol mentioned above. My Twitter followers are mix of writers and readers, and they always appreciate a personal tweet.

 

You'd be surprised how happy your readers will be to hear from you - and how willing they are to help you if you tell them you need help. The key is to give them the tools they need, which is why a buzz page is great.

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

You may also be interested in...

How to Support an Indie Author

Three Easy Marketing Ideas

10,574 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, goodreads, twitter
0

Back in my days of writing ad copy for print and electronic media (before the internet and social media), I learned a very valuable lesson about advertising and marketing. As a newbie to the ad world, I mistakenly thought that the ad was the only thing that really mattered. As long as you conveyed your message clearly and created an emotional attachment to the ad, you had done a bulk of the leg work, and you were going to strike gold. But then I saw what came next and realized that the real work had just begun.

 

What came next? The media buy. I knew nothing about the process. As far as I knew, you picked the most popular show you could afford and ran your commercial during that time slot. And as far as print goes, I assumed you picked a spot in the section of the Sunday paper that was most relevant to your product and placed the ad there. I could not have been more wrong. I was in for a real education. Ratings books were consulted. Reader and viewer demographics were pored over. Everything was crucial to the media buy: income, age, gender, occupation, and family status.

 

I learned the buyer wasn't just trying to find a way to reach the most people that fit the demographic; they were trying to find a location (on air or in print) where people in the desired demographic would see the ad over and over again. They wanted people to see the ad seven to ten times. The number of people wasn't as important as how many times the people would be exposed to the ad.

 

So, as you move forward and consider jumping into the world of advertising for your book, keep this little lesson I learned in mind. The key to your ad's success is how many times it's seen by the same people. Being viewed by a large number of people means nothing if they only see it one or two times. It's not about reaching the most people; it's about reaching the right people over and over and over and over again.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

A Basket Full of Books

The Key to Succeed as an Author

3,548 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, advertising, promotions
0

When someone asks, "What's your book about?" it's important to be able to answer in a sentence or two. This is often described as an "elevator pitch," because you should be able to explain your book during a short elevator ride. Who knows what Hollywood producer might happen to ask - or be listening?

 

Creating a brief yet compelling description of your book is essential. Not only does it give you something to say when people ask you about it, it can be used for the following proactive marketing purposes:

 

1)  In your (personal) email signature: Every email program comes with a "signature" option. Including a quick description of your book, or even the tone of your book, is a great way to let people know what your book is about without being pushy. For my first book, I included this description in the signature of my personal email address:

 

Maria Murnane, award-winning author of "Perfect on Paper," a novel for anyone who has ever run into an ex while looking like crap

I've lost track of how many people have told me they laughed at my email signature and ended up buying my book as a result. And as you can see, the little blurb doesn't necessarily have to say anything about the actual plot of your book. The key is to convey the essence of your book so potential readers will know what to expect when they pick up a copy.

 

2)  On business cards that feature your book's cover: Why not put your one-line description on the back? Be sure to carry the cards in your wallet at all times. If that Hollywood executive you meet in the elevator likes what he or she hears, you'll have a business card to hand over.

 

Coming up with a compelling one-liner can be challenging, but it's worth spending time to create a good one. With most people, you only get one chance to grab their attention, so you want that description to sparkle.

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Relay Conflict in Your Quick Pitch

Can You Do More?

6,761 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, elevator_pitch
0

The Lasting Brand

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 24, 2014

When thinking of marketing and branding, it's important to keep a perspective on what matters. Even in the world of creating virtual public personas, viral marketing campaigns, blog tours, giveaways and so on, the one thing that matters above all else is quality.

 

The brand you want is one that will stand the test of time, a brand that will survive changing technology. You want a brand that represents a book that is as enjoyable to read in paperback as it is to read on your Kindle as it is to read on your smartphone as it is to read on whatever we will be using to read 50 years from now. You want a brand that represents an outstanding storyteller who writes compelling books that have the DNA to entertain, move and transfix generations of readers.

 

A brand built on quality is a lasting brand. As an author, if you want the potential to leave a legacy, you need to constantly grow your skill set and knowledge of writing. You do that by writing and testing the boundaries. You also do that by reading other great writers: legends, traditional powerhouses and rising indie authors. Finally, you do that by committing to your craft.

 

Quality matters. It may matter more today than it ever has because of the sheer number of books published every day. To stand out and gather readers over time and through the years, to be a lasting brand, the quality of your writing is what matters most.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

A Writer's Brand Identity

Going Indie? Don't Skimp on Quality

6,532 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writers, branding
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Find the Time to Finish Writing Your Book - Self Publishing Advisor

As time marches on, it seemingly makes it hard to find.        

 

3 Simple Steps for Your Book Promotions Planning for 2014 - The BookBaby Blog

Time to make a book promotions bucket list.   

 

Film

 

Three Ways to Cut Your Movie Budget (and Increase Production Value) - Filmmaking Stuff

Any budget can be trimmed, but at what cost?   

 

Hollywood Producer Says It's Still about the Story in Digital Filmmaking - GCU Today

The platform you use doesn't change the heart of filmmaking.     

                                    

Music

 

Why Do Musicians Always Feel Disappointed about Their Career? - Artists House Music

Shaking off the doubts and getting back to work in the new year. 

 

Music Marketing Podcasts All Bands and Musicians Should Be Listening to - Musicgoat

Stay on top of your marketing efforts with these podcasts.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- January 24, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- January 17, 2014

2,486 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, filmmaking, budget, author, promotion, indie, writers, book_promotion, musicians, filmmakers, movie_budget, digital_filmmaking
1

In a previous post, I recommended doing one thing per day, every day, to promote your book. If you took that advice to heart, you're probably currently in the process of building a "marketing checklist" and might also be wondering what to put on it. In addition to the items I suggested last week, here are three additional ideas to include:

 

  1. Set up a Twitter account. Even if you aren't ready to actually tweet anything, set up an account before you get too famous and someone uses your Twitter name for their account. (Optimism is a good thing!) Using your real name makes it easy for people to find you. My Twitter handle is @mariamurnane.
  2. Add a fun line about your book beneath in the "signature" of your personal e-mail account. If you have a website, include a link to that as well. The signature is typically found in the "settings" section of any e-mail account. Using a signature is a great way to tell people about your book without telling people about your book. My signature says "Best-selling author of the Waverly books, novels for anyone who has ever run into an ex while looking like crap. www.mariamurnane.com."
  3. If you don't have a website, register a domain. (GoDaddy is a good place to start.) I always recommend selecting www.yourname.com, or if that is taken, then www.yournameauthor.com or www.yournamebooks.com. Just like with your Twitter handle, you want to make it easy for your fans to find you. I don't recommend going with www.nameofyourbook.com because what happens when you write your second book? That may sound like crazy talk now, but it is quite possible that one day you will write a second book! (See my above note about optimism.)

 

I know marketing sounds scary for many authors, but remember what I said last week: If I've learned anything about book marketing over the years, it's that persistence pays off, and little things do add up. So take one thing at a time, and keep going!

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Tips for Engaging Your Readers Online

A Few Reasons to Have a Website

12,938 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, promotions
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Dominate Your Niche with a Book Blog -The Future of Ink

Here are your three steps to genre domination.           

                                       

Konrath's Publishing Predictions 2014 -A Newbie's Guide to Publishing

Author Joe Konrath lets us peer into his crystal ball to see what he believes is on the horizon in the world of publishing in 2014. 

 

Film

                                                        

88 Cinematographers Share the Best Professional Advice They've Ever Received - The Black and Blue

Be careful. You may know it all after reading this article. 

 

Building A Cinema Camera for Under $1000 - Which Cameras Are Best & Which Accessories You Need - Norm Kroll

You can piece together an exceptional camera for under $1000 these days.     

                                    

Music

 

The Power of a Concert Memento - Hypebot.com

Do you have the merch to leave an impression with your fans? 

 

9 Things Every Musician Needs To Know About the Sound Guy -Digital Music News

Sure he does a killer mic check, but how is he at pulling off a killer sound?

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup - January 10, 2014

Weekly News Roundup - January 3, 2014

1,742 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, music, self-publishing, movies, writers, sound, publishing, films, musicians, filmmakers, cameras, merchandise, cinematography, niche_market
1

Form an Author Co-op

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 13, 2014

I'm guessing a large number of people reading this are writers with friends and family who also write. You may even belong to a writers group. I'm also guessing that among your collective of writers there are those of you who have jumped into the world of indie publishing. In other words, you have numbers, and where there are numbers, there is strength.

 

Alone, you are one author trying to break through by finding the right branding formula that will lead to a boatload of book sales. It's a tall order when you're on your own to keep up with the latest and greatest marketing tools and techniques or what's on the horizon.

 

Consider this: Instead of being a one-author operation, why not team up with your fellow indie author friends and become a cooperative, a kind of authors group where you meet monthly and examine each other's marketing strategies? You can share insights on what's worked and what hasn't. You can guide each other through this maze. You can organize group signings, appearances and readings. The possibilities are endless.

 

If you decide to give this a try, my suggestion is to go the whole nine yards. Have officers, take minutes, follow a meeting agenda, etc. Make it a real organization that effectively serves the needs of the authors in your group. Remember, this isn't a group critiquing each other's work. You have writers groups for that. This is a group dedicated to the topic of marketing and branding for authors.

 

Imagine how much easier your journey as an indie author would be if you had a group of other indie authors helping you navigate the marketing world. Authors helping authors: that's how it should be!

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Covering the Convention Beat

It's Not Just a Hobby, It's a Marketing Opportunity

3,009 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, sales, writers
0

As you examine the year ahead and formulate your marketing strategy, I have one suggestion for you: Have fun! Just because you take your career as an author seriously doesn't mean you shouldn't enjoy it. If you're mired in tasks that fill you with dread and consternation, don't do those tasks. 

 

Lest you think this is impractical advice and maybe even contrary to advice I've given you in the past, I would argue otherwise. The philosophy I've tried to impart to you over the years is that following a dream shouldn't be filled with wall-to-wall angst. The bottom line is that by writing and publishing a book, you have already succeeded. Doing such a thing takes commitment and discipline that many, many, many others have not demonstrated. You took the desire to write a book and turned it into a published book. That is huge.

 

The journey from here on out should feel like a reward for your efforts, not a list of must-dos to make you a publishing icon. Yes, marketing is the key to selling books, but instead of focusing on how to sell tens of thousands of books, focus your marketing efforts on treating the readers you do have like royalty. Study after study has shown that a majority of people buy books based on recommendations by friends and family. People are more likely to recommend books by indie authors they feel a personal connection to than indie authors with whom they've had no interaction.

 

So, narrow your focus on those who appreciate your work, and you will have fun. As they feel more and more connected to you, they will spread the word about you and your book. Fun will be had by all. 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

 

Recognize Your Readers

Book Marketing Tip: Stay Positive

11,959 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, writers, book_marketing, marketing_strategy
2

In my last post, I encouraged you to sit down and write at least 500 words a day. For those of you who already have a book in hand, now it's time to get marketing!

 

Before I was published, I attended a writers conference where the keynote speaker suggested that everyone in the audience do five things every day to promote our work. At the time I thought that was a bit much, and now that I have multiple books out there, I still think it's a bit much. However, if you think doing five things a day is unreasonable, doing one is not. So that's what I propose today for my readers: In 2014, do one thing each day to promote your book.

 

To nudge you along, I suggest putting a daily alarm on your phone that says DO SOMETHING FOR BOOK MARKETING! That may sound silly, but trust me, it helps. That little beep is hard to ignore after a while. Guilt is a powerful motivator.

 

Here are some suggestions to get you started:

 

Monday: Update your author bio.

Tuesday: Take snippets from your best reviews and create a "Praise for (title of your book)" document.

Wednesday: Create a compelling one-line description of your book.

Thursday: Create a compelling one-paragraph description of your book.

Friday: Contact your college alumni magazine about your book using the above materials.

Saturday: Make a list of 10 influential people you want to read your book.

Sunday: Research how to get your book into the hands of the above people.

 

These are just a few ideas that only scratch the surface of the myriad things you could do to promote your book. (There are many more suggestions on my blog if you'd like to have a look.) While the bigger list may seem daunting, the key is to think small, don't freak out, and go one day at a time. If you do just one thing a day to promote your work, soon you'll have done dozens of things, and eventually hundreds. You may not see results right away, but over time those seeds you sow can sprout into prolific fruits. If I've learned anything about book marketing over the years, it's that persistence pays off, and little things do add up. I'm living proof of that. Happy New Year!

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Can You Do More?

It's Too Much!

6,266 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotion
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Blog Carnival: Marketing Tips for Authors -Marketing Tips for Authors

A collection of links to posts on all-things books and publishing.         

                                                    

Too Much Vertical Space in Your Manuscript? -The Book Deal

Are you including enough writing in your writing?

 

Film

                                                        

Achieving That Film Look - New Channel Media Blog

Tips and tricks on how to give a digital image that film look.

                                          

Why All Film Directors Need To Know How to Act - NoamKroll.com

Having experience as an actor will allow you to communicate better on set. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Becoming a Better Singer - MusicianCoaching.com

Renowned vocal coach Linda Septien shares her thoughts on the art of singing.

 

Does Music Make You Smarter? (The Mozart Effect) -Maestro Musicians

Has music given you better spatial temporal reasoning?

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup - December 20, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - December 13, 2013

2,980 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, indie, movies, writers, writing, films, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media
1

A new year is upon us. By now, the shock of outlasting the Mayan calendar should be wearing off, and you are raring to kick your book marketing into high gear. You want to build that brand and sell, sell, sell. 

 

Where should you start? My advice is to commit to making 2014 the year of participation. This is the year where you will earnestly and enthusiastically engage with your fan base. The fans are the ones who are doing the hard work for you by telling their friends, followers, and family about your book. The more you interact with them, the more passionate they'll be about their mission to help you and your book succeed.

 

This is a pretty simple concept. Mingle. Start a conversation through a social media site and keep it going for as long as you can. Post on your blog and respond to comments by ending each one with a question. Get to know the people who are fans of your work. You might even want to start a birthday log of the fans you hear from the most. Reach out to them, let them know you're creating a calendar of birthdays for your most ardent supporters and then follow through by sending them birthday wishes at the appropriate time - via email if you can, because that's a bit more personal than doing it via Facebook or Twitter. This is just one idea; the point is to take advantage of every opportunity to interact with your community, no matter how large or small.

 

This is your brand's year. Make it a success by participating in your community. Engage your fans.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Include Calls to Action

Tips for Engaging Your Readers Online

3,951 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, writers, readers, social_media, engage, fan_base, engaging_readers
4

The Marketing Maze

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 18, 2013

Let's face it, marketing a book is hard. It's not rocket science or brain surgery hard, but it is "finding your way through a maze" hard. Sometimes you snake your way through the confusing twists and turns and find your way to the other side without a problem. And, other times, you take wrong turn after wrong turn before you finally reach your destination.

 

The thing you don't want to do is to stop trying to find your way. You're allowed to make mistakes. If you do take a wrong turn, simply turn around and look for another way. Don't be afraid to move forward because you've gone the wrong way in the past; pick a direction and go. You have time, because with print on-demand, your book will never go out of print.

 

There are some things you can do to help yourself navigate the maze:

  1. Know your genre. Study what other authors in your genre are doing to market their books to the demographics you want to reach.

  2. Know yourself. Be honest with how much and what you can do. If there's a skill set you want to learn to help you market your book, factor that into your journey.

  3. Know your book. If you can describe your book in one sentence, pitching your book will be much easier for you.

  4. Know where your readers gather. Likeminded readers often find a place like Goodreads to talk about their favorite books, and they're eager to make recommendations to their fellow devotees.  

 

Yes, marketing a book is hard, but it doesn't have to be unrewarding. As long as you're learning and keeping your eyes open, you'll find a formula that works for you. Just continue your trek through the maze, and you'll get there. 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

You may also be interested in...

 

Promote Your Book with Goodreads

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

8,558 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, book_marketing, author_brand, marketing_strategy
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

10 Essential Non-Writing Tools to Help Writers Write -PBS

What non-writing tools are in your arsenal?

                                                    

Getting Maximum "Bang" for Your Book Description Buck: an SEO/Author's Perspective -The Creative Penn

Author and book marketing expert Lori Culwell looks at book descriptions as an SEO professional.

 

Film

                                                        

How to Build Rapport with Movie Investors (and Other Hollywood Heavy Hitters) - Filmmaking Stuff

Because sometimes it is about whom you know.

                                          

30 Things about Screenwriting - Filmmaker IQ

The greatest hits list from Scott Myers' blog, Go Into The Story.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Mixing and Producing: Choosing a Mix Engineer - Musician Coaching

An interview with Grammy-winning engineer Jason Goldstein.

 

Social Media to Your Band's Advantage -Musician Makers

Use social media as more than just a gig announcement tool.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup - December 6, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - November 29, 2013

17,630 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, book, music, filmmaking, movies, writers, writing, mixing, investors, musicians, craft, screenwriting, filmmakers, descriptions, social_media, producing, writing_tips
1 ... 12 13 14 15 16 ... 34 Previous Next

Actions