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466 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
3

If you want to promote your book on Twitter, I suggest not tweeting about your book - or at least not very often. Here are two things you should do instead:

 

1. Tweet information that is useful to others.

 

I don't tweet a ton, but when I do, it's usually a link to a post I've written about book marketing or writing, or a link to an article I've read that I think will help other authors. The links to my own posts drive people to my website, where they can also learn all about my novels. This way I'm providing them information they find valuable, but I'm also getting my work in front of them without being pushy.

 

2. When someone begins to follow you, ask why.

 

Anytime I receive a notification that I have a new follower, I send that person a tweet of thanks and also ask why he or she decided to follow me. The response is usually one of two things. Either the person is an aspiring or published author who appreciates my suggestions on book marketing and writing, or she is a loyal fan of my novels. Once I know the answer, I can engage in a conversation with the follower. If it's someone who hasn't read my books, I send a link to the first chapter of the first book in the series and hope she will take a look. If it's a loyal reader, I send her a link to my fan page, which includes a list of easy ways to spread the word about my novels. (You'd be surprised how willing your fans are to help you if you just ask them.)

 

It's fine to promote your book now and again, but when all I see in a person's Twitter feed is an endless stream of BUY MY BOOK!, I immediately lose interest. You probably would too, right?

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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How Not to Market

Book Marketing Tip: Make It Easy for Your Fans to Help You

13,319 Views 3 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions, twitter, tweet
1

In my blog post about doing a book relaunch, I talked briefly about how giving your book a new cover could give you a reason to reintroduce your book to the reading public. But giving your book a new cover can do more than give you a new marketing opportunity; it can give you a more marketable book.

 

If your sales have hit a slump or you feel they've never reached their peak, you may want to take a serious look at your cover. Covers matter today more than ever. With so many books published every year, you have to make your book stand out among the millions of other titles competing for readers' attention online. When I say "stand out," I don't mean for the wrong reasons. Your cover should be professionally designed. If you have the skills to undertake such a task, have at it. But if the concept of creating a cover is foreign to you, hire a professional cover design artist to do the work.

 

Whether you have the skill set to design a cover or you hire someone else to do it, don't enter the arena without knowledge of what works as far as cover design for books in your genre. Yes, genre should be a major consideration when you're designing your cover. Fortunately, thanks to retail sites like Amazon.com, you have a place where you can research the cover designs of bestselling books in your genre. Do your research and give your book a similar look and feel. I'm not suggesting you copy another author's book cover; I'm merely telling to you to use bestselling book covers as an inspiration for your cover design. There are design similarities among them for a reason; they work to attract readers in the genre.

 

Your book is worth reading. If you're on top of your marketing and people still aren't reading it, it might be time to consider a new, professional cover design.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Beat Writer's Block with Cover Design

Going Indie? Don't Skimp on Quality

4,427 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, promotions, book_covers
1

The Book Relaunch

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Aug 5, 2013

One of my favorite trailers for a book was done five years ago by author Dennis Cass for his book, Head Case. The trailer wasn't for the initial release of the book. It was for the release of the paperback version, hence the title of the video: Book Launch 2.0. I'll post it here for your viewing pleasure:


*Can't see the player? Click here to view the video on YouTube.


You can see that Dennis is a funny guy with a real sardonic wit, but that's not why I'm drawing your attention to it. I bring it up because it points out a marketing opportunity a lot of us ignore: the relaunch. In Dennis' case, he's taking the initiative to reintroduce a book that had already been launched in a different format.


Indie authors can do the same. In previous posts, we've already touched on the fact that our books usually exist in more than one format now. Most of us will publish both a print version and a Kindle version. Why not have a virtual launch for each? If you're about to publish your book in a new format, you have the opportunity to announce the release on two occasions with a lot of pomp and circumstance. You could do the same if you choose to release it in audiobook format through ACX.


If you've released your book in every available format, you can always upgrade. We live in an age where changing the cover is a relatively easy process. You could freshen up your book with a new cover and reintroduce it to your fans. Will they buy a book just because it has a new cover? Not likely, but your relaunch could motivate them to tell their friends and family about it.


There are numerous opportunities for you to launch your book. Why not take advantage of them all?


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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What Is a Platform?

The Evergreen Era of Publishing

3,534 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, book, author, promotion, formats, launch, book_launch, book_release
1

Every month or so, I receive an email from a friendly indie author (whom I met just once) about an upcoming book signing for his novel. The events are always several thousand miles away from where I live, but I admire his efforts to promote his book.

 

Unfortunately, however, his messages regularly make me cringe.

 

Why? Because he sends them to dozens of people, all of us on the recipient line of the same email. This not only looks bulky and unprofessional, it is also bound to tick off potential supporters of his work. He also regularly commits another faux pas with his messages, which is to attach enormous PDF files. The last one he sent was nearly 7MB, which dramatically slowed down my small email program.

 

I always recommend using a free newsletter program such as MailChimp for email marketing campaigns. MailChimp is simple to use and creates a professional impression for your announcements, even if you only have a handful of subscribers. There also are many other email marketing tools to consider out there. These programs allow people to quietly unsubscribe without having to ask you to remove them. While it may sting when they do so, this ensures that your list is comprised of people who truly want to hear from you.

 

If you're resistant to a newsletter program and still want to use regular email, be sure to use the blind copy (BCC) feature. No one wants his or her email address out there on a massive list that could easily be forwarded and absorbed into questionable email marketing practices. We all get enough spam already.

 

As an author, you want the people on your email list to root for you, not dread hearing from you, right? Put yourself in their shoes before you send your next message, and that should prevent you from making awkward email missteps.

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Make It Easy for Readers to Find You

To Be a Professional Writer, Make a Professional Impression

3,252 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, mailchimp, blind_copy
0

The Author Press Kit

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jul 29, 2013

A lot of marketing has moved online, but author press kits still matter. Press kits are traditionally thought of as physical tools, but they are effective digitally as well. In fact, a digital press kit can be used to facilitate your marketing efforts in online venues as well as the brick-and-mortar realm. Here's what to include in your digital author press kit:

 

  1. Author photo - Make it count. You most likely don't want to use a photo you took of yourself or one your significant other took of you in front of the fireplace. Invest in a professional headshot if you can.
  2. Author bio - We've discussed in detail how to construct an effective author bio. You can provide a little more information in this environment than you can in the bio on your book cover.
  3. Cover image - Make sure all of your images are the highest quality allowed by your hosting site.
  4. Full synopsis of book - You can use the description you use for the book cover.
  5. One-sentence book description - When an organization is promoting your appearance, it would make their lives much easier to describe your book in a single compelling and concise sentence.
  6. Book details - This includes ISBN, page count, genre, etc.
  7. FAQ - Provide a list of the most frequently asked questions about your book along with your answers. If you haven't been asked questions about your book, it's okay to anticipate what readers may ask you.
  8. Sample - Include a short excerpt from the book.
  9. Buzz - If you've received positive reviews in the media or any other kind of media coverage, provide a link to the material.

 

By creating a digital author press kit, you are simplifying things for anyone who invites you to do a personal appearance or anyone who writes about you and your book. Your best strategy to achieve success is to be prepared for it.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Passive Income and Marathon Branding

Find Advocates with Free Books

5,827 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions, press_kit
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Finish Your Book's Second Draft - The BookBaby Blog

There is a blueprint to completing a second draft.

                                                    

5 Profitable Places to Sell Your Books - The Future of Ink

The non-bookstore item in this list is particularly interesting.

 

Film

                                                        

This Is Your Brain on Movies: Neuroscientists Weigh In on the Brain Science of Cinema - Truth Seekers

Can studying the effects of movies on the brain lead to creating better films?

                                          

Building a Movie - A Moon Brothers Film Blog

Creating a film is a lot like building a house.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Maybe You Should NOT Do Vocal Exercises - Judy Rodman

If you feel like you're doing your vocal exercises wrong, you're probably doing it wrong.

 

Tips on Getting Music Placed and Listened To -Musicgoat

Tips on reaching out to radio shows and podcasts to get your music heard.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - July 19, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - July 12, 2013

2,127 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, filmmaking, promotion, publishing, manuscript, music_marketing, musicians, craft, filmmakers, social_media, mdistribution
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Most Common Mistakes: When Your Scene Focuses on What Isn't Happening - Wordplay

If you're going to write about what your characters don't do, make sure it counts.

                                                    

How to Make Ordinary Characters Compelling -Writer's Digest

A character doesn't need unusual abilities or knowledge in order to be fascinating.

 

Film

                                                        

How Does P.T. Anderson Start Writing a Story? - Making the Movie

Paul Thomas Anderson discusses the coffee shop method for breaking through writer's block.

                                          

10 Tips for the Video Producer on Location in Summer's Heat - Videomaker

The dog days of summer are upon us. Do you know how to beat the heat so it won't ruin your production?

                                                                                                                       

Music

 

Co-creating a Fanbase with Music Curation and What Artists Can Learn From Bloggers - Hypebot.com

Sharing and cross-promotion can help you build your fanbase.

 

What Are the Benefits of Listening to Music? -Musician Makers

Music matters on so many different levels.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - July 12, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - July 5, 2013

2,031 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, music, film, indie, movies, writers, blogging, writing, films, filmmakers, social_media, film_location
0

Last week, I attended CraftFest and ThrillerFest VIII, an annual event hosted by the International Thriller Writers (ITW) in New York City. Hundreds of writers packed the educational sessions that featured tips from bestselling authors and experts. Here are some things I learned about writing and marketing:

 

From Steve Berry, author of The King's Deception

  • Every single story must have structure. The beginning, middle, and end are equally important.
  • The beginning (Act 1) should be 20% of the book. In it, you establish character, conflict, and the crucible (the thing that gets a character to do what they'd otherwise never do).
  • The middle (Act 2) is 60% of the book. It should be a series of complications.
  • The end (Act 3) is 20% of the book. It includes the crisis point (the moment when everything comes to a peak) and the conclusion.

 

From Michael Connelly, author of The Black Box & The Lincoln Lawyer

  • If you want to write series fiction, forget about writing a series and just focus on writing one book. If you concentrate on not sowing seeds for future books, those seeds will be sown anyway.
  • If you have momentum as a writer, the reader will have momentum with your passages.
  • The history you create for your character will help you create future books. Layer in the character's past to plant seeds for your series (but don't get bogged down with backstory).
  • The best part of writing is that first draft, but then you have to assess what you have. Rewriting really makes books come together.

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The team with Michael Connelly

 

From David Morrell, author of Murder as a Fine Art & First Blood

  • Be a first rate version of yourself and not a second-rate version of another author.
  • Writing is a vocation, not a profession.
  • For setting, choose a location and mine it for everything it can give to you. Forget about sight and concentrate on feeling. When someone says writing is one-dimensional or flat, it's because the writer is relying too much on sight, almost like looking at an image on a movie screen. If you incorporate two other senses, you'll create more textured details and make readers feel like they're more in the setting.

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David Morrell signs books

 

From Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child, authors of Two Graves

  • Getting a writing partner is like getting married; that's where the real work begins. (D.P.)
  • Find a writing partner whose experience, knowledge, talent and discipline matches your own. (L.C.)
  • You need to be able to take criticism and have a thick skin. Check your ego at the door. (L.C.)
  • Rather than assigning chapters, assign sequences to each other. Then you can merge them and revise so there's no change in prose style and they're seamless.
  • With a writing partner, divide everything 50/50. But you'll always FEEL like you're doing three-quarters of the work. (D.P.)

 

From Leonardo Wild, author of Artificial Self

  • When you are writing, you should analyze what subtext you'll be bringing out in your turning points. You can achieve subtext by microdetailing, omission, or hinting.

 

From M.J. Rose, author of Seduction

  • No book is dead anymore. Every book is new to a reader who's never heard of it.

 

From C.J. Lyons, author of Blind Faith, winner of ITW's Best eBook Original Novel award

  • Every author has the chance to become the CEO of his or her own global publishing empire.
  • Here's the secret: Write a great book. Give your readers time to find it and tell their friends. Repeat.

 

From Kristen Lamb, author of Rise of the Machines: Human Authors in a Digital World

  • If you're a novelist, you're a storyteller. "High-concept" blogging is universal, emotional, and it gives the reader something to contribute or take away. It has a higher potential to go viral than just posting about the writing process or "buy my book." You'll also be able to reach past the small pool of avid readers into the much larger pool of people who read more casually.
  • With a blog, you're creating something personal, emotional, and becoming a friend. If you can hook someone with a 500-word blog, it's not a stretch that you'll hook them for 50,000.

 

From Meryl Moss, founder/president of Meryl Moss Media Relations

  • Figure out how the material in your book relates to what people are passionate about out in the world. That's what you should blog about.
  • When marketing, build from the inside. Getting your regional audience excited about your book is still a good idea.

 

From Douglas E. Richards, author of Wired

  • People think that giving books away means less sales, but that's not true. You never run out of purchasers, and those people will lead to word of mouth. Everybody doesn't have to love your book, but the people who do must love it so passionately that they tell all their friends about it.

 

From Dana Kaye, publicist

  • When reaching out to the media, you should be thinking creatively. There are more ways to pitch yourself than just saying you're an author. Don't dismiss your background, hobbies, or day job - they're interesting and could be media pitches.

 

From Kathleen Murphy, media specialist

  • Get to the point within a couple seconds when working with the media. They won't have time to read long emails.
  • Video and audio is where everything is going on social media, especially video. The media and readers need to hear and see you.

 

It was great fun seeing so many authors networking, sharing stories, learning from one another, and getting advice from bestsellers. You may want to consider joining a similar organization that gives you the chance to collaborate with your peers. Next up, you'll find us at the Romance Writers of America conference in Atlanta July 17-19 and the Pacific Northwest Writers Association conference in Seattle July 25-27.

 

Are you part of any writing organizations?

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-Amanda

Amanda is the editor of CreateSpace's educational resources and social media channels.

 

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The London Book Fair, Starring Authors

BEA Part of It: Book Expo America Session Takeaways

2,142 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, author, promotion, writers, writing, craft, social_media, trade_show, conference, thrillerfest, craftfest
8

Reviews are an important element of a book-marketing campaign, but some authors exercise poor judgment in securing them. Here are my thoughts on where they go wrong, as well as some suggestions for how to do it right:

 

DON'T ask friends and family to post reviews.

 

An author's loved ones would never say anything negative about her book. How would you feel if you bought a book based on its glowing reviews, then found out they had been planted by the author's friends and family? I would feel cheated, and I imagine you would too. So don't do that for your own book.

 

DON'T trade reviews with other indie authors.

 

This is a bad idea because it puts both authors into an awkward position. If Author A thinks Author B's book is terrible, is Author A really going to skewer Author B's book? Of course not. Reviews need to be completely objective to be credible, and the nature of this arrangement keeps that from happening.

 

DO reach out to prolific reviewers who have posted reviews of books in your genre.

 

It may take some digging, but you can find them. For example, many reviewers on Amazon list their contact information in their profiles.

 

DO ask readers who proactively tell you they enjoyed your book to write a review.

 

If someone takes the time to contact you with positive feedback about your book, by all means, ask him to put his thoughts into an honest review. It would never occur to many fans to post a review, so if they reach out to you, there is nothing wrong with suggesting they share their feedback with a public audience.

 

For any review system to maintain credibility, the reviews must be objective. That doesn't mean they will all be positive, but at least they will be honest, and that is more important. For more tips on getting reviews for an indie book, check out my webinar on book marketing at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Amazon General Review Creation Guidelines

To Be a Professional Writer, Make a Professional Impression

10,760 Views 8 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotions, book_reviews
0

We have defined the term "evergreen" on this blog, but for those of you who need a quick refresher, it simply means that because of the digital environment, your book will never go out of print unless you choose to take it off the market. Indie authors are the benefactors of a segment of the publishing industry that no longer requires inventory in order for a book to be made available for purchase.

 

Why is that significant? It gives you the potential to earn passive income forever. "Passive" may be a little misleading because it suggests that you aren't required to do anything to sell books. I suppose technically that is true; you may sell a few books by doing nothing, but it takes something akin to a miracle for that to happen. By passive, I mean you aren't required to take a single order, package your book or ship it. That is all done for you. Your only job is to put your entrepreneurial energy into marketing and branding. Do you see the possibilities? This isn't a fleeting, get-rich-quick, money-making scheme. This is a long-lasting, income-generating opportunity. The more you participate, the greater your possibilities of success.

 

So the message here is don't treat the publication of a book like a sprint. This isn't about getting the word out about your book weeks before publication and then putting a lot of time and effort into creating buzz for a relatively short period after it hits the market. You are engaged in an endless marathon. This is about building a brand for yourself as an author with a growing catalog of books available for sale. In the film version of Glengarry Glen Ross, there's a memorable scene where the salesmen are taught the ABCs of sales. It turns out ABC is an acronym for Always Be Closing. I would like to impart upon you a similar sentiment.

 

In order to truly harness the potential of a passive-income environment, you have to consistently build your brand. It is something you never stop doing. You should Always Be Branding!

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Passive Marketing is Important Too

Book Marketing Takes Persistence

2,626 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, branding
1

I receive a lot of email messages from authors who read my blog. Many of them believe they have the next big thing in literature on their hands, so they reach out to me in hopes that I will spread the word. Unfortunately, however, their emails often lend the impression that their books are most likely not very good, or they don't inspire me to get the word out. Here are three reasons why:

 

1. THEY WRITE THEIR EMAILS IN ALL CAPS.

When you send someone an email in all caps, no matter what you write, IT COMES ACROSS AS SHOUTING. End of story. And right or wrong, this creates a negative impression. Nobody likes to open emails and feel as if someone is yelling at them.

 

2. They use an unprofessional email address.

I always suggest that authors use a professional email address, e.g. john@johnsmith.com. When I receive an email from flirtygirl107@aol.com, it is hard to take the sender seriously. For contacting your friends or family, use whatever account you want. But if you're reaching out to strangers and asking them to take you seriously as a writer, a professional address makes a much better impression.

 

3. They spell my name wrong.

My name is Maria Murnane, and my email address is maria@mariamurnane.com. However, I get a lot of emails that begin with "Hi Marie" or "Hi Ms. Murname." The senders who do this lose me before I even read their messages. How can I think of them as amazing writers with well-edited books and good attention to detail if they don't even check that they have written my name correctly?

 

These are basic but important things to keep in mind the next time you're conducting email outreach for your book. It's usually the small things that make the biggest impressions!

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Why Good Grammar Matters

Just Say No to Random Capitalization!

2,803 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writers, promotions, impression
1

I often hear from authors who are frustrated because they aren't getting much traction with their book marketing efforts. However, when I dig deeper, I usually discover that their "efforts" haven't amounted to all that much. They just don't realize it.

 

Here's an example: a very nice man wrote a book about Jewish history, and he wanted to speak at synagogues to help promote it. He conducted an outreach campaign but said he got very little response and was quite discouraged. When I asked him for details about what exactly he'd done, he said he had emailed five rabbis and that two had expressed tentative interest and would let him know. Nearly two months had passed, and he hadn't heard from them again.

 

His strategy was a good one, but he made two big mistakes in his execution:

 

1)    Contacting five synagogues is not enough!

 

When I was an indie author, I contacted hundreds of organizations about my book. Only a small fraction got back to me, but over time I was successful because I cast such a wide net and kept at it. If I had stopped at the first five, I certainly wouldn't be where I am today. Just like sales, book marketing is often a numbers game.

 

2)    It's up to the author to follow up.

 

Even if two of the five rabbis expressed interested (and 40 percent is actually a great response rate), it is highly unlikely that either of them will get back in touch. Why? Because they are busy. People are busy, and despite their best intentions, the vast majority of them will flake if you leave things to them. It is critical to understand this. They may indeed be interested in whatever you are proposing, but it is up to you to keep the ball rolling.

 

If you keep at it over time, you'll be more successful in your efforts. I promise!

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

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Passive Marketing is Important Too

Marketing: Begin with Your Strengths

8,561 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, marketing, author, promotions, branding
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

What's the 3-Step Process to Marketing Your Book? - BadRedhead Media

A book release strategy from the 'marketing' point of view.

                                                    

21 Ways to Launch a Successful Virtual Book Tour - The Future of Ink

Author D'vorah Lansky shares 21 articles that are the basis for her new book about virtual book tours.

 

Film

                                                        

How to Secure a Shooting Location -Filmmaker IQ

Watch as indie filmmakers set out to legally secure a location for their short film.

                                          

Are You Good In a Room? -Joke and Biagio                 

Just because you're an indie filmmaker doesn't mean you don't have to pitch your film.      

                                    

Music

 

Music Industry Networking Tips - Musicgoat

Sometimes success really does hinge on who you know.

 

Voices and Allergies...Practical Tips To Quell the Mucous Monsters - Judy Rodman

How to avoid letting that cold invade your music.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - June 7, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - May 31, 2013

2,079 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, film, networking, indie, movies, writers, business, writing, films, craft, filmmakers
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The PERFECT Hook - Author Culture

What are you promising your readers with your hook?

                                                    

5 Reasons to Admire Self-Publishing - Huffington Post

An article examining the independent spirit of the self-publishing community.

 

Film

                                                        

10 Films That Gave the Game Away Too Early -What Culture!

Can you spoil a good story by uncovering the mystery too soon?

                                          

The Philosophy of Filmmaking: Storytelling DNA -San Francisco School of Digital Filmmaking

Can making a film be both easy and impossible?

                                    

Music

 

The Essentials to Building a Successful Music Career - Musicgoat

Call them the five Ms of making it in music.

 

The Future of Direct-To-Fan Marketing - Hypebot.com

Experts in the music and tech industries discuss the coming advances in fan outreach tools.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - May 31, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - May 24, 2013

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Thankfully, we live in a world where the media has splintered into factions. I say "thankfully" because there's no longer a bottleneck blocking an indie author's access to media sources. Today there are a number of highly specialized new media organizations - including blogs and online review sites - that are effective vehicles for indie authors to get the word out about their books.

 

One of the best ways to spread the word about your book is through new media groups that do honest reviews of indie books. Here are five such sites with the genres they prefer to review. If you choose to contact one of these, remember they do not guarantee they will accept your book, and if they do, there's no guarantee they will like your book.

 

 

  • Ginger-Read Reviews: Young Adult, New Adult, Adult, Urban Fantasy, Paranormal Romance, Fantasy, Science Fiction, Horror
  • C9C Reviews: Thrillers (action, military, spy), Action/Adventure, Sci-Fi (space)
  • Big Al's Books and Pals: (Amazon eBooks) Any genre of Fiction, Non-fiction if general interest and targeted at a layperson
  • Books on The Knob: Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Mystery, and Suspense preferred, but considers other genres
  • Books Like Breathing: Romance, Young Adult (mainly paranormal romance), Historical Fiction (limited), Contemporary Fiction, Horror (limited), Memoirs/Biography (limited), Chick Lit, Cookbooks (especially about desserts)

 

Should any of these sites or others you can find on The Indie View agree to review your book, be sure to respect the reviewer's time and opinion. Some sites no longer accept books from authors because of negative treatment from those who did not get a favorable review. That's unfortunate, because we as a community should always conduct ourselves in a professional manner. Remember, reviews are subjective. As authors, we must be able to take constructive criticism gracefully, especially if it means we have a chance to learn and improve our books.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

How Not to Market

Find Smaller Markets to Sell More Books

5,289 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, writers, promotions, book_reviews
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