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522 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
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No matter who publishes your book, it's important to do what you can to promote it. That means reaching out to many different organizations, which takes time, energy, and a lot of following up.

 

To keep track of your efforts (and your progress), I suggest creating a master spreadsheet with a separate page for each type of organization you contact (e.g., alumni groups, book clubs, bloggers, press, etc.). The fields can be very basic, including details such as name, organization, email address, website, and status.

 

Once you begin your outreach, color coding can help you keep track of your progress. For example, let's say you contact local alumni clubs of your alma mater to see if they'll include a mention of your book in their newsletter. I suggest putting clubs who have said yes in green, those who need some follow-up in yellow, and those who have said "thanks but no thanks" in red. With color coding, every so often, you can skim through your spreadsheet and know which areas need some attention.

 

When you first begin your outreach, you may think you'll be able to remember necessary details about each group, but trust me, you won't. Sending out a bunch of emails today is one thing, but what happens a month down the road? Which leads were promising? Who asked for more information? Whose email bounced back with an "I'm on vacation" autoreply? If you don't keep track of these things, despite the best of intentions you may end up spinning your wheels and getting nowhere fast.

 

I know it's a lot of work to do what I'm suggesting, but I promise it's worth it! In addition to keeping you organized, a spreadsheet also will help you track your successes, which is a powerful motivator. Book marketing is hard, and the more green sections you have, the more inspired you'll be to keep going.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Build a Plus & Minus Brand Map

The Marketing Maze

2,844 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writers, writing, promotions
1

Part of my job as an author and disseminator of information to authors is to know a lot about marketing, and I do, but I don't know everything about marketing. I am constantly scouring the Internet to devour as much information as I can from people who identify themselves as experts.

 

Some have more expertise than others of course. I've found some individuals who provide streams and streams of useful marketing advice while others don't really offer much at all. I would like to share with you three websites I have found in my virtual travels that offer the most useful advice more consistently than others.

  • The Creative Penn– Joanna Penn is a bestselling author of both fiction and nonfiction. She uses her website/blog to churn out all things book- and author-related. In a very literal sense, she wrote the book on marketing, public speaking and even career advice. She's done blog posts, videos and podcasts, often bringing in other authors to share their experiences in writing and publishing.

  • Book Market– John Kremer is the guru's guru of book marketing. He's been in the game for more than 20 years. His book 1001 Ways to Market Your Books: For Authors and Publishers is in itssixth edition and serves as an essential tool for a lot of authors. There are tons of marketing gems on his website.

  • The Future of Ink– The brainchild of Denise Wakeman and Ellen Britt, The Future of Ink probably offers the most innovative ideas for marketing books. While it is geared toward digital publishing, a lot of the advice can be applied to print books as well. Both Wakeman and Britt have backgrounds in brand-building via new technologies, and they assemble a cast of marketing strategists who never fail to deliver top-notch advice.

 

These are the three sites I find myself visiting most often. My advice to you is to bookmark them and make it a habit to see what they have to say whenever you need a little marketing pick-me-up.

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Build a Plus & Minus Brand Map

Branding vs. Marketing for Authors

2,978 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, book_marketing, social_media, marketing_books, marketing_ideas
3

Mingle Marketing

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 9, 2014

I'm a huge advocate of social media. I know it works in making connections and helping authors with limited financial resources get the word out about their books. Establishing your brand via social networking sites, blogs and personal videos has the potential of raising your profile to global proportions.

 

But, I have to say the most solid connections I've made with readers have been during face-to-face meetings in actual real life environments. I'm not talking about meeting fans at book events. Those are great too, and I've made a lot of wonderful connections there as well. I'm referring to parties and gatherings that have nothing to do with books, where I've been invited simply because I know someone or my wife knows someone. Allow me to explain.

 

I'm not a "mingler" by nature. I'm a wallflower to the nth degree. Fortunately my wife could literally write a book on the topic of meeting strangers and engaging them in meaningful conversations. And, like a good publicist would do, she has a way of turning every conversation to my books. That leads to questions that land squarely in my wheelhouse: writing and publishing. Before the conversation is done, I always offer to give them a copy of one of my books. They are happy to accept. It's a free book after all. Most of the time, I don't have books with me, so arrangements are made to get a book to them at a later time.

 

To date, every instance of this happening over the years has paid off in various ways. I've gained beta readers out of the exchange. I've received friend requests on Facebook from others connected to these strangers because they become wonderful advocates for my books. In addition, I've received speaking engagements and even an invitation to a book launch party for another author. All of these are invaluable steps to building my own brand.

 

The lesson here is to mingle in real life whenever the opportunity presents itself. If you're a wallflower like me, attach yourself to "minglers." There really isn't a substitute for face-to-face connections.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Read It Forward

Marketing Tip: Reach Out to Book Clubs

 

 

4,915 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, social_media
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I recently received a tweet that left me scratching my head. A woman tweeted (to me, not to the world), a photo of herself holding a book. There was no accompanying note, no greeting or explanation, nothing. And she wasn't holding up one of my books, so it clearly wasn't a fan tweet.

 

Huh?

 

I tweeted back asking if she'd forgotten to include a message with the photo. She replied that she was an author and thought I might want to read her book.

 

That's all she wrote.

 

Again, huh?

 

Book marketing takes a lot of work, and I commend any author who makes the effort to get the word out, but it's important to make sure that your efforts make sense to the person on the receiving end of your outreach. The woman in question clearly took the time to send me a personalized tweet, but unfortunately her effort fell flat because it was so generic that I had to assume she'd sent the same thing to anyone and everyone she could find on Twitter. She also gave me the impression that she lacks common sense because when I replied to her and gave her the chance to explain, she didn't even tell me what her book was about or why she had contacted me about it.

 

When you set out to promote your book, make sure to provide the people you're contacting with context for why you're getting in touch. And if you're reaching out to fellow authors, it helps to let them know that you've either bought their books or plan to very soon. We all need to pay the bills, right?

 

As I said in a recent post, it's always a good idea to put yourself in the recipient's shoes before you hit "send." No one wants to feel spammed.

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Marketing Tip: Know When to Be Concise

Marketing Tip: Use Text in Your Hyperlinks

2,246 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writers, promotions, tweet
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Social Media Quiz ? Which Social Site Is Right for You? - Author Marketing Experts

An interesting exercise in choosing the social media path that suits your needs and matches your talents.        

                                                    

Dos and Don'ts for Choosing a Title -Tips, and a Free Tool, Too - Beyond Paper Editing

A great set of guidelines for works of fiction and nonfiction.      

 

Film

                                                        

Film Schooling: Insider Insights on Indie Filmmaking - Pre-production and Locations - Bleeding Cool

The location you choose for your film has a bearing on more than just your story's setting.   

                                          

Great Filmmakers and Their take on Filmmaking and Style - Filmmaker IQ

Style is the most essential element of filmmaking.      

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

5 Basic Recording Tips for the Hi-hat - The Audio-Technica Blog

Learning to properly record your hi-hat can make or break your mix.

 

Music Marketing Ideas: Where to Find the Best Ones - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

Do you know where to find those hidden marketing ideas?  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- May 9, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- May 2, 2014

2,224 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, filmmaking, nonfiction, fiction, social, music_marketing, social_media, style, music_production, writing_advice
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Let's go offline and local today with our marketing discussion. We all want to master the Internet and become a global sensation, but a better strategy may be to develop a following in our own communities and let the word spiral out like a growing galaxy of influence.

 

Now, just because it's your hometown doesn't mean finding readers is going to be a cakewalk. You are still going to have to do the leg work, and you may even have to shell out a few bucks here and there. I am of the opinion that spending time and money on local advertising could have a better return on investment than putting money into an online outlet that reaches readers around the world. Why? Because everyone wants to discover a new local literary talent.

 

How can you reach these readers? Here are three offline and off-the-wall suggestions to get you started. Feel free to sprinkle in your own ideas too.

 

  1. Advertise in local alternative newspapers. Most cities, big and small, have weekly newspapers that cater to the artsy crowd. The advertising rates are usually much cheaper than your typical newspaper, and the newspaper may even be willing to do a story on your book. Remember, one ad won't do. A series of ads over a number of weeks is more effective in a print environment.

  2. What about that restroom for customers in your favorite restaurant? I'm not kidding. A lot of restaurants and bars work with third-party advertising companies to rent out space on their bathroom walls. Think about it. There's a lot of idle time spent in bathrooms. The grocery store down the street from my house even has ads for local businesses in their bathroom.

  3. Anyone ever tell you that your book would make a great movie? Maybe you don't have the funds to produce a movie based on your book, but what about an ad that can be shown in the theater before the feature starts? We've all seen local businesses being advertised in a movie theater. Why not your book?

 

With a little research on the marketing opportunities in your hometown, you could discover that starting local is a great way to go global.

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Offline Branding

Small Marketing Steps

4,621 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, advertising
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Including hyperlinks in your marketing materials is a great way to send people to your Amazon page, or your website, or your Facebook page or anywhere you want them to go. But the actual links can be long and quite unsightly, so I suggest using the text function to make them look clean, pretty and professional.

 

Let's use the e-mail signature as an example. Including a clever blurb about your books and a hyperlink or two in your e-mail signature is a fantastic marketing strategy that I've been recommending for as long as I've been writing this blog. However, I often receive e-mails from authors that include crazy long links. To protect the guilty, I'm making up the following author name and blurb and using hyperlinks to my own content.

 

EXAMPLE OF AN ATTRACTIVE E-MAIL SIGNATURE:

 

Name, author of ABC and XYZ, thrillers that make you scared to sleep

Check out my books on Amazon

Like me on Facebook

 

EXAMPLE OF A MESSY E-MAIL SIGNATURE:

Name, author of ABC and XYZ, thrillers that make you scared to sleep

 

Check out my books on Amazon!

 

http://www.amazon.com/Cassidy-Lane-Maria-Murnane-ebook/dp/B00FAH87IU/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=&qid=

 

http://www.amazon.com/Perfect-Paper-Adventures-Waverly-Bryson-ebook/dp/B002WGC8JG/ref=pd_sim_kstore_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=09QT2D7WPHMFSVXP5T3R

 

Here's my Facebook author page!

https://www.facebook.com/mariamurnane

 

To make a clean hyperlink in a Word document, type in the text you want to use, then highlight the text and right click. Choose the "hyperlink" option in the drop-down menu. Under the "address" function, paste in the actual hyperlink.

 

The hyperlink option varies by e-mail program, but it shouldn't be too hard to figure out in the "signature" option.

 

Much of book marketing is making a positive first impression. Clean and pretty looks professional. Messy and unwieldy? Not so much. Which of the above e-mail signatures would impress you? Play around with your own until you come up with something good. I know you can do it!

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind and Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Marketing Idea: Encourage Your Fans to Spread the Word

Three Easy Marketing Ideas

3,698 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, hyperlinks, email_signatures
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Engaging with your fans is a fundamental element of smart book marketing, and I'm all for it. However, there's a fine line between casual communication and inappropriate communication, and that line is often called "bcc" aka "blind copy."

 

If I send an e-mail to a small group of friends from my personal e-mail account, I'll put them all on the recipient list. But if I send a message to any size group of readers from my author e-mail address, that's a different story. For that I will always blind copy.

 

Last week I received an e-mail from the new assistant of a talented friend of mine who does brand consulting for small businesses. My friend had tasked the assistant with updating her client database with birthdays. It was a smart idea, but unfortunately the assistant included all the clients on the recipient list. We're talking more than 100 people.

 

Needless to say, my friend was mortified by the gaffe and quickly sent out a message of apology (using blind copy). I laughed it off, but I'm also not a client. If I were, I might have reacted differently. I wasn't surprised by the assistant's error because I see it all the time in book marketing. Enthusiastic new authors want to promote their books, and in their haste to get the word out they often e-mail everyone they've ever met about the book and put everyone on the recipient line. Every time I see this I feel bad for the author because it just doesn't look professional. Also, one "forward" of that e-mail, and who knows where all those addresses are going to end up. More spam, anyone?

 

If you don't use a newsletter program, I urge you to use the blind copy feature for all your promotional e-mails. Not only does it protect the addresses of your fans, it looks so much prettier!

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind and Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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The Importance of Staying Organized

How Not to Pitch Your Book

6,894 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, bcc
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Professional Authors

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Apr 21, 2014

The coolest thing that's happened in the last couple of years in publishing is the industry finally accepted that those of us who publish outside of the world of traditional publishing are more than self-published authors, we are indie authors. Okay, there are still a few detractors, but most book-wise folks see that we possess the same spirit and passion for our craft that independent filmmakers and musicians have for their craft. It's a gesture of respect that is long overdue.

 

With this growing respect comes much responsibility. As indie authors, we have more than creating compelling and groundbreaking fiction on our list of things to do every morning. We also have to embrace the business side of publishing. We have to do the marketing. We have to deliver books that match our traditionally published counterparts at every professional turn. Where traditional published authors have to rely on a staff, indie authors rely on desire, grit and determination.

 

Sure, most of us publish for the love of writing, and the content we create may be edgier and incorporate risks the traditional publishing world would dare not take, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't conduct ourselves in a professional manner with entrepreneurial fervor. Yes, we are professional authors, and don't let anyone tell you differently.

 

So, I say to you my fellow indie author friends, proclaim your professionalism by conducting yourself in a professional manner. Walk the fine line that all independents walk. Write as an artist, publish as an entrepreneur and repeat after me, Yes, we are professional authors!

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Indie Freedom!

Going Indie? Watch Out for Predators

4,490 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, writing, indie_authors
1

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Celebrate Every Writing Milestone! - The Seekers

All milestones, whether small or large, are reasons to celebrate and keep you motivated.   

                                                    

Ask the Editor: Breaking the "Write What You Know" Rule - The Book Deal

Write what you feel passionate about.     

 

Film

                                                        

The Future of Digital Cinema Cameras & Why the Resolution Race Is Over (for Now at Least!) - Noam Kroll

A look at the latest and greatest in digital video cameras made with filmmakers in mind.   

                                          

3 Film Directing Tips: How to Be Zen and Have a Good Time - Filmmaking Stuff

When things go awry on your film set, it just means it's your moment to shine as a leader.       

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

One Big Reason Bands and Musicians Need Their Own Website, and a Few Others - Musicgoat

Show the world you're serious and take control of your brand.

 

Funk Volume CEO's Social Media Secret? Put the Work in and Communicate Directly with Fans - Hypebot.com

The CEO of an indie label reveals how his company uses social media to grow their fan base.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- April 11, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- April 4, 2014

2,490 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, filmmaking, author, movies, musicians
0

I'm a member of a listserv that includes many professional writers, a good chunk of whom are freelancers looking for work. Recently, someone posted a question asking what everyone in the group is currently doing to pay the bills, and the response was bigger than any I've seen. Overnight dozens and dozens of people replied, and after scrolling through the bulk of the messages, I was surprised at how few gave a concise, compelling description that would make me want to hire them. The majority of them went on and on (and on) for several paragraphs, included a lot of detail and personal information that didn't seem relevant, and never seemed to get to the POINT.

 

The ones that grabbed me were short.

 

And clever.

 

And just a few sentences long.

 

My personal reaction to the long-winded replies (i.e., a lot of skimming) got me thinking about book marketing and how important it is to have a brief description of your work. If someone asks you for a detailed, two-page summary of your book, that's great. But most people just want the basics. People are BUSY, and if this is their first interaction with you (think book club moderator or first-time visitor to your website) you need to grab their attention quickly before they lose interest and move on to something else.

 

I think it's a good idea to have three descriptions of you book: a one-liner, one that is about a paragraph long, and one that is several paragraphs. Then, you can use whichever is appropriate for the situation. If the moderator of a book club asks "what's your book about?" and you send over a detailed, two-page summary, that might be a bit much, right?

 

Going back to the example of the freelancer writers on the listserv, if I were looking to hire one of them, I would probably contact one who had provided a brief, compelling description - then ask for more detail. When you're reaching out to busy strangers, sometimes less is more.

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind and Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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How's Your Elevator Pitch?

Marketing Idea: Encourage Your Fans to Spread the Word

5,378 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing
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In case some of you have never read my bio that follows my contributions to the CreateSpace blog, let me humbly point out that it identifies me as an award-winning author. Modesty prevents me from pointing out that it should say multiple-award-winning author. Actually, I should probably point out that I've lost more awards than I've won, but that's not the point of this blog post.

 

The point of this post is to answer a question I frequently get asked: Has winning awards helped me sell books? The answer is yes, it has helped me sell books. I know this because I have been contacted by teachers who explained to me that they chose my book over other offerings because it had won an award. Teachers are my bread and butter because they are the gateway to the young adult demographic. In addition, winning an award has been a wonderful marketing tool. Beyond the announcement after the initial win, there's the bio upgrade that forever draws attention to the fact that I won an award.

 

I didn't write this post to brag. I just wanted to give you a firsthand account of what it means to an author's marketing efforts to win an award. It can give your sales a boost not just in the short term, but for a long time to come. I won my first award in 2006, and that book is still one of my top sellers.

 

Not all awards programs are created equal. My advice is to look for award competitions that have a long track record. Go through a list of their past winners and look up a few of the authors online to see if you can determine what kind of impact the award had on their marketing and sales. In other words, do extensive research on a competition before your enter. Most awards programs have entry fees. Spend your time wisely, and you'll spend your money wisely.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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There's a Lot of Self-Promotion Going On

The Key to Succeed as an Author

2,744 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, award_winning
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

 

Books/Publishing

 

 

Building a Literary Community: Why and How - The Creative Penn

How connecting with other authors can lead to finding more readers.            

                                       

How to Harness the Power of Viral Marketing - The Future of Ink

When you get a mention online or offline, be ready to pounce on the marketing opportunity.     

 

Film

                                                        

Filmmaking Tips from SXSW: Some of Indie Film's Biggest Movers & Shakers Sound Off - No Film School

A collection of insights from indie stalwarts participating in various panel events at this year's SXSW. 

 

 

How Feature Filmmaking without a Crew Is Possible - Filmmaking Stuff

Gathering an all-volunteer crew can sometimes create more problems than it's worth.                                      

Music

 

 

Checklist: What to Do before You Book the Gig - Bob Baker's The BuzzFactor.com

A little planning is prudent before you start booking gigs.

 

 

Discover How Chords Are Used in the Songs You Love - Hooktheory.com

An amazing and addictive tool that lets you see the similar chord structures of popular songs, and it even predicts what will be the next big thing in chord structure.   

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Weekly News Roundup- April 4, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- March 28, 2014

3,465 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, music, filmmaking, indie, movies, community, shows, promotions, songs, craft, filmmakers, indie_film, filming, playing, viral_marketing
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I love receiving emails through my website that begin along these lines (my new novel is called Cassidy Lane):

 

Hi Maria, I just bought a copy of Cassidy Lane and look forward to reading it. I'm an indie author and a big fan of your blog. I've also taken your webinar on book marketing and was wondering if...

 

I enjoy messages like this because the sender has not only shown that she knows exactly who I am by referencing my blog, but she has already bought a copy of one of my books and taken one of my webinars. I instantly want to help and support her, because she is helping and supporting me. If this woman wanted me to read the first few pages of her manuscript and provide feedback, I would probably do it at no charge. Not kidding.

 

On the flip side, I'm not such a fan of emails that go something like this:

 

Hi Maria, I'm the author of ABC book and wonder if you have any tips for me on how to promote it?

 

Each time I receive an email like this (which unfortunately is quite often), I reply with a friendly note asking if the sender has read any of my books or taken my webinar on book marketing. If the sender replies, which is rare, it is always to say that he has done neither. That's when I know he has no idea who I am and is probably sending the same request to every author he can find on the Internet.

 

If you put yourself in my shoes in the above scenario, what would you do? I enjoy helping other authors, especially those who are just getting started. But I also appreciate it when people take the time to remember that I'm an author too.

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind and Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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How to Support an Indie Author

Use Common Sense in Book Promotion

3,737 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

5 Keep-It-Simple Marketing Tips for Indie Authors - Marketing Tips for Authors

Do you know what your "bumper niches" are?     

 

How to Create Your Marketing Funnel the Right Way - The Future of Ink

Funnels, circles, and books, oh my!    

 

Film

 

Questions for an Open Call Audition - A Moon Brothers Film Blog

Here's how a typical open audition works.   

 

Shoot Something Every Two Weeks: A Conversation with Phil Hughes and Jenn Daugherty - Making the Movie

A look at how a couple of filmmakers are trying to raise funds for an independent feature.     

                                    

Music

 

Two Key Mistakes Your Band Needs to Avoid - Music Makers

The music matters most.

 

How Flight Drummers Got 500,000 YouTube Views in 10 Months - Hypebot.com

A case study on the effective use of YouTube. 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- March 14, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- March 7, 2014

3,571 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, filmmaking, promotion, films, bands, filmmakers, marketing_ideas, marketing_strategy
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