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303 Posts tagged with the promotion tag
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A general rule of thumb for using social media as a marketing tool is to follow the "80/20 rule." In other words, only 20 percent of your tweets should be about your work. The rest of the time you should provide interesting content that is relevant to your target audience. This makes sense, because think about it: If your Twitter feed is nothing but a steady stream of BUY MY BOOK, who is going to want to follow you?

 

Here are some examples of how to provide interesting content that is relevant to your target audience:

 

 

 

     If you're a life coach and your book is about finding one's calling:

 

  • Tweet an article about a grandfather who changed careers at age 60.
  • Tweet a survey about executives who wish they'd majored in something else.
  • Tweet a video of an interview with someone you find inspiring.

 

     If your novel is about a weekend adventure in New York City:

 

  • Tweet about your favorite restaurants in NYC.
  • Tweet a link to airfare specials to NYC.
  • Tweet an article about the best hot dog stands in NYC.

 

     If you've written a children's book:

 

  • Tweet a link to research about the importance of parents' reading to kids.
  • Tweet an article that mentions a celebrity's favorite book from his or her childhood.
  • Tweet (or conduct!) a survey of teachers' views on reading.


Do you see where I'm going with these examples? Each positions you as an expert in the subject matter of your book, even if your book is a novel. If your Twitter readers (think about those who see retweets, not just your followers) appreciate and enjoy the content you offer, maybe they will notice your bio and pick up a copy of your book. You never know, right? (Be sure to mention your book in your Twitter bio so they will see it!)


-Maria

 

 

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

 

 

 

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Tips for Promoting Your Book on Twitter

 

Twitter Challenge: 21 Days, 21 Prompts

 

 

 

 

816 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, promotion, promotions, branding, social_media, author_brand
1

Sharing

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 11, 2017

 

Do you know what is at the heart of your brand or of any brand? It has nothing to do with your appearance. It has nothing to do with your style. It has nothing to do with your platform. It has nothing to do with your books. I should say it has nothing to do with any of these things while simultaneously having to do with all of these things. This thing that is at the heart of your brand is sharing.


Your brand is defined by what you share. Whether it's information, a video, a link, or a photo, what you share defines how you interact with your community and not just your community. What you share has the potential to reach beyond your community when your friends and followers share it with their friends and followers. In fact, what you share and not your books may be how many people are first introduced to you. Once they themselves have joined your community, they will hopefully read your books out of curiosity.


So, given that sharing is at the heart of your brand, what you share and how often you share are extremely important to the success of your brand. First, what you share should reflect the persona you are trying to establish. Second, you should be sharing as frequently as possible. Think of spreading the word about your brand as a numbers game. The more you share the more likely it is your brand will be discovered and grow.


Sharing, it's not just a great lesson to teach your kids. It is the heart of your brand. 


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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You're not just an author, you're a brand

 

Building an author brand: you are what you share

 

 

 

 

466 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, branding, author_brand, author_platform
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Beyond the book

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 25, 2017

In order to sell lots of books, you may have to release versions of your novel that go beyond the physical book. Here are three other media platforms that may help you build your community and sell more books.

 

1. Audiobook: In another time, they were called books on tape, and then CDs became the preferred format. When we started consuming digital audio files, audiobooks were born. An audiobook version of your novel is a natural transition. I have taken the leap, and I have to tell you I had a blast working on them. From selecting a narrator to uploading the files, developing an audiobook is a truly exhilarating process. The fact it can grow your readership (listenership) is a delightful bonus.

 

2. The stage: I know it sounds like a stretch, but a stage version of your book has the potential to grow your audience. Granted, that audience will be limited to the people in the theater, but social media gives them their own platform to tell their friends and followers about the adaptation of your book to a play. I attended a play in California where the playwright sold and signed copies of her book after the performance of her play based on the book. By the looks of it, she did very well.

 

3. Podcast: This is kind of a mixture of an audiobook and a stage play. The podcast version of your book mimics radio theater. Like a stage play, you would use actors to act out the parts. Unlike a stage play, you would serialize the material and present each segment via a podcasting service on the same day and at the same time. The hope is that you will build buzz as folks wait in anticipation for your next chapter.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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What makes you different?

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

1,619 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: books, marketing, selling, promotion, podcast, audiobooks, platform
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Years ago I attended a seminar on book cover design that was hosted by one of the Big Six (at the time) publishers. As an indie author just getting started, I wanted to know all the secrets of the industry. What I discovered is there are no real secrets. There's a quote that comes from John Wanamaker, a department store mogul in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, that embodies what I learned that day in the marketing/cover design seminar. He famously proclaimed, "Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don't know which half."


 

The only thing that didn't match in his quote is that the success rate in traditional publishing is only about 30 percent. Keep in mind, there are entire departments in major publishing houses with the sole purpose of researching the best way to market a book. These are folks with advanced degrees in some cases that conduct focus groups and use scientific studies to determine what a color represents to a consumer. What font is more appealing on a cover. Are people more likely to buy a book with a human face on the cover or an inanimate object. They explore every little detail.


The presenter at the seminar talked about one particular case involving the European release of a book that had done well in the States. They researched and created mockups and conducted focus groups, and they chose a cover that was nothing like the American version. The book failed miserably in Europe. With all their resources, they couldn't find a cover that helped the book sell. 


You probably don't have the resources of the major publishers. With that in mind, here's how you should go about picking a cover design for your next book. Pick something that appeals to one person, you. Whatever grabs you, that's the cover for your book.


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The will

Don't burn yourself out



1,187 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: cover, marketing, design, formatting, promotion, cover_design
2

 

It's 2017, and it turns out social media wasn't a fad. It's going to be around for a while.  That being the case, we probably should have a refresher course on social media best practices. It's a short list, and it's easy to follow.


1. Be prolific: To paraphrase David Mamet, always be posting. It's all about staying active and generating a lot of content. The more your friends and followers see your name pop up in their feed the more they will be reminded that you're their author-friend. 


2. Engage: Don't miss an opportunity to engage with a friend and follower. When they take the time to comment on one of your posts, "like" their comment or respond to their comment. Let them know you appreciate their contribution. I will give one word of caution. Don't "like" inappropriate comments. You don't want to be seen as someone who supports offensive material. I've even deleted inappropriate comments posted by fans, and I sent them a private message explaining why I did it, and to be frank, in one case the commenter did not take it well, but it was the right decision.

 

3. Be light: Yes, there is a time to make serious comments on social media, but don't let that be your sole persona online. Don't be that person. Be the type of person who entertains and enlightens. Be opinionated. Be bold. Be kind. Be funny. People should look forward to seeing your posts every day.


That's it. It doesn't get more complicated than that. Now, go forth and post, engage, and entertain.


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Social Media Best Practices

 

Social Networking Sells Your Brand

 

 

 

 

4,477 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, social_media, author_marketing, social_media_marketing
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Local and online

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Aug 14, 2017

The Internet is an amazing thing. It can connect individuals who live a world apart. It can put fans in touch with their favorite celebrities. And, yes, it can put readers face-to-virtual-face with their favorite authors, but it can do far more than breakdown barriers of distance. It can bring local individuals and entities together, too.

 

Most local businesses in communities of all sizes have a social media presence, and more than anything they want to connect with the locals in their area and alert them of specials, sales, events, etc. So, joining their social media circle won't be terribly difficult, but as an author, you want to take it a step further. You want to be an influencer for their brand. Why? Because you will be rewarded handsomely as your relationship builds, and they are going to be more amenable to a cooperative affiliation. Have a book release coming up? Contact the local business you've been touting to all your friends and followers and see if they'll let their customers know about your new book. Maybe they'll even post a congratulations on their page.


You are going to want to choose your local businesses carefully. Make sure you don't connect with an organization that may tarnish your brand. Do your homework. If you have a personal relationship with an employee or owner, all the better. You have an in, and you'll have the inside scoop on the company. 


Reach out and connect with a local business online and start building a relationship that could be an invaluable tool to help you spread the word about your books.


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Launch Party

 

Chamber of commerce

 

 

 

 

741 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, promotion, social_media, launch_party, influence, author_marketing
0

There is no doubt about it. More and more people have short... Oh, look a squirrel. Neat. Okay, back to what I was saying. People have very short attent... Cool, the squirrel's back, and he's eating something... ATTENTION SPANS! People have short attention spans because there are so many distractions in the world today. There's social media, videos, TV, streaming, gaming, etc. Capturing the attention of a reader online these days is extremely difficult, and there are more ways to drive them away than to attract them to your content.


What you don't want to do is give them huge chunks of material to digest once you do get them to notice you. Online content shouldn't be novel length. Your videos shouldn't be feature film length. You want to write short and concise blog articles, and your videos should ideally be around three minutes. Long form is not your friend online.


There are exceptions to the rule, and those exceptions usually are associated with established brands. TED Talks are an example of long form video that works because they've built their brand on that sort of thing. Long posts about politics get special consideration because they are normally about politicians with their own brands.


Chances are, you're not an exception. You aren't an established brand. You are building a brand. That being the case, keep your online content short, concise, and easily digestible. As your brand becomes more mainstream, then you can graduate to longer content.


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.



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Top five listicle about listicles

Social media best practices



938 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, promotion, writers, social, branding, social_media, author_brand, online_content
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When it comes to marketing, you're going to want to nail down the genre of your book as soon as you can. Yes, I know most authors know the genre before they even start writing, but a surprising number of authors reject the notion of genre fiction. Most do it as a misguided artistic choice, but some do it because they don't want to limit their reading audience.

 

By choosing a genre, you're not limiting your reading audience, you're identifying them. My suggestion is to dive deeper and select your sub-genre categories. The more specific you can get the more likely it is that you are going to be able to locate your readers and market to them more effectively.

 

One of my books falls under the following category, genres, and sub-genre: Teen and Young Adult -- Horror -- Science Fiction and Fantasy -- Science Fiction -- Post-Apocalyptic. Now, I have been contacted by many adult readers who've expressed that they enjoyed the book, so you may think that by putting the book in the Teen and Young Adult category that I am limiting my reach with a potential pool of readers. But in reality, there is a segment of adult readers that seek out Teen and Adult books. However, conversely, the segment of teen and young adult readers seeking out adult market books is much smaller. So, the smarter play here is to categorize it in the Teen and Young Adult market where I will reach a majority of interested readers.

 

Categories, genres, and subgenres, weren't invented by retailers to help them organize their titles. They were invented by publishers to help them market their books. Know your genre and you know your reader.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Bending genres

Find smaller markets to sell more books

5,244 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, promotion, genre, marketing_for_your_genre, genre_marketing
0

I've scoured the internet for a clear explanation of the difference between marketing and branding. I've heard people use the terms interchangeably, and frankly, that's just wrong. They serve the same purpose, but they are two different tools serving that purpose. After reading, rejecting those explanations that made no sense, and accepting those that seemed logical, here is an explanation of branding:

 

  • ·        Branding is an image and message tied to a product. In the case of an author, this would include the genre identity, category (fiction or nonfiction), age group of readers, style of writing, personal causes, and frequent topics an author devotes his/her online time to. These and other image definers contribute to how the author is seen by the reader. Personal appearance can play a part if the author makes appearance integral to his/her brand identity.

 

Marketing is a tad more complicated. Here is a culmination of the explanations I found:

 

  • ·      Marketing is a multifaceted tool the author will use to draw people to his/her brand. It can be by utilizing social media to build relationships with readers. It can be via advertising to make the public aware of a book signing or launch date. It can be done via interviews online and offline. Essentially, it is how you make the public aware of your image and message.

 

Going by these two definitions, you can see how they serve the same utility but in very different ways. The two go together, but they are not the same thing.

 

-Richard

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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You're not just an author, you're a brand

Raising your marketing game

1,905 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, book_marketing, branding, author_marketing, author_brand
1

Today's rule could essentially be summed up in the Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young song, "Teach Your Children." The song is a classic that encourages us to pass along our knowledge of life to all the generations without judgment or expectation of anything in return. I know it sounds kind of heavy for a branding strategy, but the more young writers you selflessly help along the way, the greater service you do for the community of writers and society as a whole. And, yes, even though you shouldn't expect a return on your investment of time and knowledge, you most likely will receive enormous returns in the form of loyal disciples of your brand.


So, I say to you, seasoned writer, teach aspiring authors well. Share your dream with them. Find opportunities to assist other writers in achieving their dreams. Give them constructive feedback on their manuscripts. Help them navigate the indie publishing world. Give them marketing and branding advice. You may even encourage them to pass along what they know to up-and-coming writers.


Being an author is being part of a community. We don't have competitors. We have fellow authors. By helping to strengthen the community, you are helping yourself in the most unselfish way possible. You can't go wrong with this strategy. I don't care where you are in your writing career. You have useful knowledge to share. You probably don't even have to dig that deep to find it.


Grow your brand by following the rule of coaching, and teach the writers well.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Bring Your Community Together through Writing

Your Brand is a Community

1,376 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, promotion, writing, branding, author_brand
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Over the next several weeks we're going to discuss the different elements of successful branding for authors. Author brands are a mix between corporate branding and personal branding. You're trying to sell a product, yes, but more accurately, you're trying to sell you, the author.


Branding isn't just how you look or how you present yourself. Those things can come into play, even in the world of publishing. That's not to say you have to be a runway model or Brad Pitt to sell books. I'm referring more to style when I say "look." If you're the cowboy mystery writer, give your readers the cowboy mystery writer look.


Toda's lesson in branding is simple. In order to be associated with a brand, you have to demonstrate consistency: in your messaging, your appearance, your attitude. Consistency will help cement your brand and make you easily definable. And, yes, that's important because when your readers tell their friends about you, they'll know how to describe you. In essence, you will have given them a portable brand to share with their friends.


In addition to consistency in how you present yourself and message, consistency in where you "practice" your branding is important too. If Twitter is your thing, make that your primary branding pad. If you are more at home on Facebook or Instagram, that's where you're going to spend a bulk of your branding time. You can use other sites to support your brand building, but you're going to want to have a go-to site where people will expect to find you.


Consistently keep on message on your social media turf and make yourself easily definable.


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Author Brand Success: Consistency without Stagnation

Can You Choose an Author Brand?



2,035 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, author_marketing, author_brand, author_platform
1

 

Your book has been on the market for a few years. Sales were brisk in the beginning, but they are virtually nonexistent now. Here's how to let the title go and stop promoting it. You may want to write this list down and post it somewhere in your writing space.


  1. Don't--DO NOT STOP PROMOTING.


Nope, it's not a long list, but it is important. There is no reason for you not to promote a book you wrote a year ago, five years ago, or even ten years ago. As long as you don't have inventory or a nonfiction book that contains a time-sensitive subject matter, why would you stop promoting your book?


Your book has a publishing anniversary. That's a perfect time to promote it every year. If your book has a seasonal theme, that season occurs every year. Why shouldn't you promote it? If your book is a work with a historical event or figure at its core, then that historical event has an anniversary. The historical figure has a birth date. Those are other opportunities to promote your book, no matter how old the book is.


Conventional wisdom used to be that you frontload the release of a book with all your publicity efforts, and then you move on. Print-on-demand and digital publishing has made that sort of publicity strategy obsolete. Your book will never go out of print. Why, then, would you stop promoting it? To not promote it is wasting opportunity.


Don't move on in the sense that you will forget about your book. Move on and write your next book. Promote your next book. Just don't forget your previous books when it comes to promotion.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Marketing Maze

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

 

 

 

 

1,556 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, promotion, promotions, marketing_advice, promotion_advice
1

Content marketing

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 1, 2017

You may have heard the term "content marketing" before. You may have even used it. It's become a ubiquitous term that is used in countless posts and articles about branding. But, what does it really mean?

 

Simply put, it's branding oneself not by calling attention to one's brand, but by being a purveyor of useful, entertaining, and/or informative content via social media, blog, or online media outlets. In essence, you are providing a valuable service. That you are an author with a book or many books for sale isn't the main focus of the content you provide.

 

Obviously, you want to gear your content marketing to attracting those readers who represent the demographics for your books. For instance, if you write science fiction, you might write a content marketing piece on the history of science fiction. Or, if you write "how-to"books on gardening, you might write an informative piece on seasonal gardening tactics. Even if you write works that are heavily laced with humor, you could write your views on today's current events, featuring your brand of wit and witticisms, of course.

 

Don't overthink the term. Content marketing is just you writing about stuff you enjoy. That's all it really is. Yes, you want it to be well researched. And yes, you should strive for the piece to be well written and painstakingly edited. Other than that, have fun. Build your brand around being a pathway to knowledge and entertainment. Once people learn to rely on your content, they will seek out your books.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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3 reasons original content is king

What is article marketing?

4,938 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, promotion, content, branding, social_media
0

I receive a lot of emails from first-time authors, and 99 percent of them are looking for marketing ideas they can implement for zero cost. If you fall into that category, here are two ideas you can do that will cost nothing more than your time and energy:


     1.    Create a list of local alumni groups from your college, then reach out to each one individually*


*This is critical. No one likes bulk email, so personalize your message enough to show whoever receives it that you respect his or her time.


Even if you went to a small school, you'll be surprised at how many alumni groups are probably scattered across the country. Contact information for each club is usually available on the college's website, and many clubs even have their own websites. Local clubs often have electronic newsletters they need to fill with news about alumni just like you, so if you offer to send them a cover photo of your book, plus your headshot, there's a good chance they will write a little blurb about you. (This is why it's important to have both a one-line description of your book as well as something a little longer. You can use the one-liner in your initial email, then send the meatier piece later.)


Remember that the people running these groups are volunteers so they may take some time in getting back to you. That also means you may need to follow up more than once to get the ball rolling.


     2.    Repeat the above with local alumni groups from your fraternity/sorority


If you weren't a member of the Greek system, what organizations were you involved in? Everyone has a network, so put on your thinking cap. The Internet makes the world small, so find your community and see how it can help you.


A new year is here, along with countless potential readers for you to dazzle with your writing. So start marketing!


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing Tip: Tap Your Network for Contacts

Book Marketing: Have You Tapped Your Network?

1,890 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, promotion, writing, marketing_ideas
1

 

    As an author seeking publicity, you are more than likely going to be asked to do an interview via email, podcast, social media, etc. There are almost countless opportunities to be interviewed as an author of a book. It's better to prepare yourself for those interviews now so you're ready when you're actually asked. Here are the top three questions you will likely be asked:

 

  1. What is your book about? Stick to the main plot. Don't include subplots or what you think are interesting side notes. Ironically, providing too many details can make it seem as if you don't know what your book is really about. If your main plot is an allegory for broader social issues, feel free to provide that information, as well.
  2. Who are your influences? Don't just name authors. List the reasons why. Charles Portis is one of my influences. Why? Because I love the way he subtly incorporates humor to make a story compelling, and he's also a master at writing realistic interactions between characters.
  3. What best-selling book is closest to yours in style and tone? We all want to be original, and it may be tempting to bypass this question or even tout how original your book is. That would be a mistake. This is a great opportunity for you to reach the fans of a best-selling book. Name a book that truly is similar to yours, and send a signal to readers that they should read your book.


In addition to these three questions, come up with two or three more of your own--questions you would want to be asked that are specific to your book and genre.

 

-Richard

 

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Don't sweat your first radio interview!

 

The author pitch

 

 

 

 

1,226 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self-publishing, promotion, writers, interview, author_marketing, author_appearance, author_interview
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