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334 Posts tagged with the promotions tag
9

Have you long dreamed of writing a book, but for one reason or another have yet to sit down and do it? Author Meg Nocero's story might inspire you. In her own words, here's how writing began as an outlet for surviving grief - and ended up changing her life.


In April of 2011, not only did I lose my mother to breast cancer, I also lost my way. To navigate the grieving process, I turned to writing as a healing tool. I started simply. I would wake in the morning and read from a book that resonated with me. When a quote or a passage spoke to me, I grabbed my journal and channeled at least three pages of longhand about what I felt my mother would want to communicate to me about it. One day led to the next, and this routine led me to complete my first book, a self-help guide called The Magical Guide to Bliss: Daily Keys to Unlock Your Dreams, Spirit & Inner Bliss. My intention is for the book to empower readers to step into the unknown and wake up to a universe packed with possibility, because that's exactly what happened to me as I wrote it. In addition to allowing me to feel connected to my mom, it helped me muster the courage to make a career change after twenty years as a federal prosecutor. I'm now an inspirational writer, speaker and coach, which I believe is my true calling in life. Even now I turn to my book daily for clarity and direction. It is my morning meditation, it is a place where I transform dreams into reality, and it is liberating and healing in a way like no other. It is where I wrote my way out of darkness to rediscover my inner light. It is what helped me transform into a beautiful butterfly.


If that's not a reason to sit down and start writing, I'm not sure what is. Thanks to Meg for sharing her story! To learn more about her, visit www.MegNocero.com.


-Maria


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Writing tip: disconnect!

What inspires you to write?

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

1,033 Views 9 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, promotions, motivation
6

We all know how important word of mouth is for book sales, but how and why it happens is usually a mystery. As authors, what can we do to encourage word of mouth other than asking our fans to tell their friends? There's nothing wrong with that, but even our most diehard supporters might have no idea what to do in any concrete way, even though they might really want to help us.


For that reason, in addition to asking fans to spread the word, I suggest providing tools and links they can easily copy and paste - and share. For example, here are some you can offer through your website, email, social media, newsletters, etc. In these examples, the hyperlinks are for my books, but they will give you a sense of how helpful they can be:



Marketing doesn't come naturally to most people, but (almost) everyone knows how to copy and paste. The next time a fan tells you she enjoyed your book, thank her for her support, and then ask her to help spread the word...and offer some tools. You never know who might take up your cause, so it's worth trying. A few posts on social media can go a long way!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketingtip: make it easy for people to pay you

Book marketingtip: Put a sample on Goodreads

1,250 Views 6 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, book_sales
2

 

It's time to explore building your brand outside of the boundless arena of the virtual world and look at how you can build your brand in the real world. And the best way to do that is using a tool that most people dread, public speaking. Here are three ways to help you improve your public speaking skills.


1. Toastmasters: You've no doubt heard about this organization. There is a nominal fee to join, so it's not free. You will be both a speaker and listener as you practice the art of public speaking and help other members develop their skills as public speakers. The criticism is constructive and meant to help you grow. It is a well-known organization for a reason. It works.


2. Acting Classes: I know. I know. You didn't become an author to advance your career as an actor. Acting may be something that doesn't interest you in the least or it may even terrify you beyond belief. But the point of joining an acting class isn't to start your journey to winning an Oscar. It's for you to get comfortable with "performing." Giving a speech or doing a reading is just that, it's a performance. An acting class can help you own the podium and make your appearance memorable.


3. Improv Classes: Again, I know. Doing improv is most likely not your fondest desire. But thinking on your feet is a crucial tool as a public speaker. Not everything is going to go as planned, so being able to respond gracefully and seamlessly with humor is a key component to giving a successful speech or reading. As the Boy Scouts say, always be prepared. In this case, preparation deals with handling the unexpected.


Public speaking isn't a natural fit for most people. The only real way to succeed at public speaking is to practice public speaking. Doing so in a group with other motivated learners is the best way to master it and overcome your fear.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Offline brand building

How to scare readers

772 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, writers, promotions, public_speaking, branding
2

 

A general rule of thumb for using social media as a marketing tool is to follow the "80/20 rule." In other words, only 20 percent of your tweets should be about your work. The rest of the time you should provide interesting content that is relevant to your target audience. This makes sense, because think about it: If your Twitter feed is nothing but a steady stream of BUY MY BOOK, who is going to want to follow you?

 

Here are some examples of how to provide interesting content that is relevant to your target audience:

 

 

 

     If you're a life coach and your book is about finding one's calling:

 

  • Tweet an article about a grandfather who changed careers at age 60.
  • Tweet a survey about executives who wish they'd majored in something else.
  • Tweet a video of an interview with someone you find inspiring.

 

     If your novel is about a weekend adventure in New York City:

 

  • Tweet about your favorite restaurants in NYC.
  • Tweet a link to airfare specials to NYC.
  • Tweet an article about the best hot dog stands in NYC.

 

     If you've written a children's book:

 

  • Tweet a link to research about the importance of parents' reading to kids.
  • Tweet an article that mentions a celebrity's favorite book from his or her childhood.
  • Tweet (or conduct!) a survey of teachers' views on reading.


Do you see where I'm going with these examples? Each positions you as an expert in the subject matter of your book, even if your book is a novel. If your Twitter readers (think about those who see retweets, not just your followers) appreciate and enjoy the content you offer, maybe they will notice your bio and pick up a copy of your book. You never know, right? (Be sure to mention your book in your Twitter bio so they will see it!)


-Maria

 

 

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

 

 

 

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Tips for Promoting Your Book on Twitter

 

Twitter Challenge: 21 Days, 21 Prompts

 

 

 

 

868 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, promotion, promotions, branding, social_media, author_brand
2

Always be learning

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 18, 2017

When I was younger, I entered the world of sales for a company that sold professional grade audio visual equipment. I jumped into the job with enthusiasm because I was familiar with the equipment as an end user. I thought I knew everything I needed to know to sell the equipment I knew so well. I was wrong. I would soon learn that, as much as writing, selling is a craft.


My boss sat me down on my first day and gave me a quick tutorial on sales. "There are two things you need to know about sales," he said. "One, once you ask the customer if they are going to buy, shut up. Don't say another word. If you talk first, you've lost the sale. Two, remember your ABC's. Always Be Closing. Introduce yourself, get the customer's name, repeat the customer's name, make your pitch, and then ask them how they want to pay. The first time you ask, they're going to think you're crazy. The second time you ask, they're going to think you're a pushy salesman. The third time you ask, they're going to give you their credit card number." That was it. That was my only training before I got on the phones and started practicing the craft of sales.


When I turned to writing and publishing as a career, I realized the ABC principle could be applied to branding because branding, as much as sales and writing, is a craft. Instead of closing, I would substitute the concept of learning. Always Be Learning. It's the best way to grow your brand. Research and read about branding. When you run across a branding principle three times, incorporate it into your brand-building strategy. It may work. It may not, but the point is to constantly expose yourself to new ideas. It's the only way to structure a brand that can stand the test of time.


Always Be Learning.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Lasting Brand

Evaluating Your Author Brand

823 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions
1

LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) is free for a basic account, so if you don't already have a profile, I highly recommend creating one. Here are some ways to promote your writing along with your other professional accomplishments:


Include the cover image of your book as the background to your headshot


To change the blue template background that appears on most LinkedIn profiles, click on the little pencil on the right side of your profile. That will open the Edit Intro window. Once inside the window, click on the little pencil on the upper right side to upload a file from your computer. (See my LinkedIn profile for an example.)


Describe your writing style and website in your headline and/or summary


The headline appears directly below your headshot, and the summary appears a few inches below that (beneath the city in which you live). To edit either or both, click on the little pencil on the right side of your profile. For example, my headline says "Bestselling novels, about life, love and friendship," and my summary says, "I write contemporary fiction and occasionally give speeches on the crazy story behind how I became an author: www.mariamurnane.com." (Depending on your profession, you might prefer to have your headline about your day job and your summary about your book.)


Add writer/author to your work history


Even if you have a full-time job, why not cite that you're also an author in your work history? Scroll down to the Experience section of your profile and click on the little pencil to open the Edit Experience window. When asked to name an employer for your author position, add your author website.


Add your book (or books) to your profile


Scroll down the Accomplishments section and click on the "+" icon to open the window. One of the options to click is Publications. Here you can include a description of your book(s), as well as links to purchase pages on Amazon.


Note: In addition to individual profiles, LinkedIn also hosts countless private groups that could prove helpful in providing networking opportunities, e.g. college alumni, fraternity/sorority clubs, writing groups, etc. It's worth poking around to see what you can find!


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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How big is your digital footprint?

Are you making this marketing mistake?

800 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, linkedin
1

The selfie paradox

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 27, 2017

 

We all know what a selfie is, right? In case you've never heard of the favorite marketing tool of every self-obsessed celebrity over the last fifteen years or so, here's how Wikipedia defines the term "selfie":


A selfie is a self-portrait photograph, typically taken with a digital camera or camera phone held in the hand or supported by a selfie stick. Selfies are often shared on social networking services....They are usually flattering and made to appear casual. "Selfie" typically refers to self-portrait photos taken with the camera held at arm's length or pointed at a mirror, as opposed to those taken by using a self-timer or remote.


Now, 99.999% of you didn't need that definition. You know what a selfie is, and you probably have a very strong opinion regarding the act of one taking a picture of oneself and posting it on the internet for the world to see. It just seems unnecessary.


I have both decried the selfie culture and participated in the selfie culture. I won't attempt to explain my own hypocrisy because there is no rational explanation that is satisfactory. I simply know the value of selfies when it comes to branding for indie authors. You are the brand. Brands need a face, and what better face than your own face. So, I have turned on the front-facing camera on my phone and snapped a picture or two or three or more over the years. But, I would like to make one thing perfectly clear, I have never donned a duck-face in my entire life. My selfies are usually reserved for events or vacation spots. I may have even snapped a picture of myself in excruciating artistic pain as I rewrite an old manuscript. The horror!


My point is, don't be so fast to ditch the selfies because you just can't bring yourself to be that self-absorbed. They are valuable tools for building an author brand and building an author brand is one of your primary jobs as an indie author.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Marketing Tool Many Authors Neglect

Six-Second Branding with Apps

721 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, publishing, writing, promotions, selfie
1

You never know when you're going to meet someone who wants to buy your book, so it's good to always have a copy handy. But not everyone carries around cash or a checkbook, so I highly recommend the following three payment options:


  1. PayPal
  2. Venmo
  3. Square


PayPal

If you have a free PayPal account (www.paypal.com), others who have a PayPal account can send money directly from their account to yours without a transaction fee. They can also send money through a credit card, in which case you can decide if you or they pay the transaction fee. (This is a judgment call you will have to make.) With PayPal you can also send someone a "payment request" via email, which is essentially a stripped-down invoice.


Venmo

All the rage with Millennials and also free, Venmo (www.venmo.com) account holders can send each other money on their mobile phones at no cost by entering in the recipient's phone number, email address, or Venmo username into the Venmo app. Payments can also be made through the Venmo website.


Square

With a free Square (www.square.com) card reader that plugs into your mobile phone, you can swipe credit cards for a small per-transaction fee. As with PayPal, it's up to you to decide whether to pay the fee or pass it along to the buyer. In my experience, most people are happy to pay a little extra for the convenience of using a card.


If these options seem like too much of a hassle, look at it this way: You want to make it easy for those who express a sincere interest in buying your book to do so. Yes, they can always go online later and order a copy, but even those with the best of intentions can easily get busy and forget. I'd put that percentage in the ballpark of...very high. Why take that chance?


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

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Marketing tip: always carry a book with you

A holiday book marketing idea


1,037 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, publishing, writing, payment, promotions
1

When's the last time you sent a handwritten thank-you note in the mail? When's the last time you received one? If you've sent or received even one within the past year, you're probably in the minority. So think about what a positive impression you can make by sending one when appropriate. Everyone likes to feel appreciated!


Here are some examples of where a physical thank-you note could (not will—no guarantees in book promotion!) make a difference in your marketing efforts:


  • A reviewer who has a mountain of books in her to-be-read (TBR) pile. A thank-you note for "taking the time to read my book" might bump your title to the top of that stack. (Note: be sure to sign the book too.)
  • The editor of an alumni publication that mentioned your book. Your thank-you note might open the door to other opportunities for coverage down the road, e.g. a profile, or an invitation to participate in a regional alumni event.
  • The organizer of a book club that has selected your book. People who run book clubs are usually voracious readers who love to talk about books - and about the time they got a real thank-you note from an author. The more people who talk about you and your book, the better.
  • The organizer of a book club that hasn't selected your book because there are too many books currently in front of yours. A personalized "thanks for considering my book" note might increase your chances of being the book club's selected read down the road.


Ask a hundred authors if there's a magic formula for selling books, and you'll probably get close to a hundred NO answers. But ask a hundred people if they like receiving thank-you notes in the mail, and I bet you'll get close to a hundred YES answers. So what do you have to lose? It certainly can't hurt, and, as a bonus, it feels pretty good to do something nice for someone else.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Use a personal touch when reaching out or following up

The power of a personal connection

918 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, thank-you_notes
4

Genre cultures

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 18, 2017

 

Genres are funny things. They don't just describe and categorize a book. Genres reveal a lot about their readers, especially devoted readers. Much like a region of the country may have a different culture from another region, genres have their own cultures. It's not only a fascinating component of a genre. It's actually a good thing from the point of view of a marketer.


As someone who has a book in a specific genre, you may be well aware of the cultural aspects of that genre. You may even be deeply influenced by that culture. That's great. You not only know where to find your readers, you know how to talk to them without committing a genre faux pas. If you are not familiar with your genre's culture, my advice is to start studying. True fans of a genre gravitate toward authenticity. When they believe you're an authentic member of their genre tribe, they will be a powerful volunteer sales force for you.


You want to know the benchmark literary pieces in your genre. You want to know the literary masters of those works. In fact, knowing this information isn't enough. You want to have an opinion on the great works in your genre. Read them. Study them. Talk confidently about them. Once you develop a reputation as a connoisseur of your genre, your social media community will be filled with folks who admire your knowledge and trust your opinion. You will have a legion of fellow genre-ites who will happily tell their friends and followers about you, growing your brand in the process.


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Connect with Your Volunteer Sales Force

 

How to Manage Your Volunteer Sales Force

 

 

 

 

1,314 Views 4 Comments Permalink Tags: self-publishing, readers, publishing, promotions, branding, author_advice
2

Word-of-mouth is a powerful force, and there's nothing wrong with encouraging your fans to tell their friends about your book. The key word here is fans. It's clear that a person is a fan of your book if she writes a favorable review on her blog, if he sends you an email telling you he enjoyed it, if she signs up for your newsletter, etc. In those situations, ask away!


What I don't recommend is asking people who are not fans to act like they are. I recently received an email from a self-published author, whom I hadn't met, asking me to forward a one-page description of his novel, which I hadn't read, to my network of contacts. The "description" he included was essentially a glowing review of his book. It was also written in the first person. That meant that if I did send it to anyone, it would appear that I'd written it.


What would you have done in that situation? I imagine the same thing I did, which was to thank the author for getting in touch and to tell him I couldn't promote a book I hadn't read. I felt bad for him because he had clearly put a lot of effort into his outreach. His email to me was personalized, which got me to read it - good! If he'd only added in the additional step of offering to send me a copy so I could read it before possibly recommending it, who knows what might have happened. I'm always looking for a good read.


If right now you're thinking, "I don't know if I have any fans to ask for help," you can start by including a note in your email signature along the lines of, Did you enjoy my book? Please tell your friends! If it results in a recommendation, it will be an honest one.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing tip: make it easy for readers to contact you

Marketing idea: encourage your fans to spread the word

986 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, author, promotions, word_of_mouth
0

Auditing your brand

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 4, 2017

 

In a previous post, I discussed the importance of auditing in the business world. It's a practice conducted on a regular basis in order to gauge past performance and current levels of inventory. Essentially, it's used to get an accurate barometer of where a company stands financially. The results of the audit determine how the company will move forward in the most productive way possible.

 

 

 

As an author selling a product, you are a business, and you should be doing periodic audits just like companies with thousands of employees. Before, I encouraged you to audit your readers. Today, I'd like to explain the importance of auditing your brand. You want to take a deep, hard look at what brand practices have been hurting your business and what brand practices have been helping your business. It can be a comprehensive and difficult task, but here are few core metrics you will want to understand in order to build your brand.

 

 

 

1. Where: What platforms are you using to build your brand? Hopefully, you're using multiple platforms. If you aren't, consider changing your strategy and incorporate two or three to help grow your brand's community. If you are using multiple platforms, rank them. Determine which one results in the most engagement and make that your primary plank in your platform. Look into ways you can advertise on the site in a cost-effective way, and bring more people into your brand's community.

 

 

 

2. How: Are you sending a consistent message? Remember, an author brand shouldn't be all things to all people. It reflects your true self. The best way to stay on message is to do just that, be you. Don't try to be what the reader expects you to be.

 

 

 

3. How often: Are you active enough on social media? Are you posting a status update or tweeting only a couple of times a week or are you doing it multiple times a day? Like it or not, the more active you are, the better your opportunity to grow your brand and sell more books.

 

 

 

These are just three areas of your brand strategy you should examine first. The more you conduct these audits, the more nuanced they will get, but for now, set dates on your calendar to audit your brand four times a year to examine these three key elements of building your author brand.

 

 

 

 

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Be Authentic to Build Your Brand

 

How to build a brand without even really trying

 

 

 

 

996 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, promotions, brand, branding, author_brand, author_advice
3

 

Here are three building blocks of a good marketing campaign, with resources for each:


1)   Website



Andiamo Creative: www.andiamocreative.com

Author Support: www.authorsupport.com


Note: Andiamo Creative recently revamped my website if you'd like to have a look: www.mariamurnane.com.


If you're good with design tools and/or your budget is tight, free services such as Wix, Website Builder, and GoDaddy are options. (Just be careful not to end up with a site loaded with advertising, which can look gauche and turn off potential readers.)


2)   Newsletter

I recommend using a newsletter program over email for multiple reasons, such as the option for subscribers to opt in (or out), and your ability to track subscriber engagement. Two solid vendors are:


Mailchimp: www.mailchimp.com

Constant Contact: www.constantcontact.com


I use Mailchimp, which is free for unlimited messages to less than 2500 subscribers, and $30+ per month on a sliding scale of subscribers from there. (Click here to see what a recent newsletter looks like.)


3)   Business cards, postcards, bookmarks, etc.

Easy-to-carry giveaways with information about your book are a great marketing tool, and the following vendors offer fantastic pricing:


Vista Print: www.vistaprint.com

Got Print: www.gotprint.com


I recently ordered 250 customized, two-sided, color business cards from Vista Print for $22.99. (I believe there are also more basic card options for free.) Each of my cards includes my website color, logo and tagline: Bestselling novels about life, love and friendship.


Book marketing is hard work and takes a lot of energy, which can leave authors of every genre feeling overwhelmed and discouraged. While there's no magic formula for conducting a marketing campaign, the basic elements above will get you started, and in my opinion that's half the battle.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing Tip: Business Cards

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

2,011 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, websites, promotions, newsletters, email_campaigns
1

A couple years after my first novel was released, I noticed a title on Amazon with the same name. I read that book's description and realized it was also in the same vein as mine, which had been featured on the front page of the Life section of USA Today and also (briefly!) reached No. 2 overall on Amazon. In other words, it was not hidden under a rock for those in the publishing world. Curious as to why the author (and/or her publisher) would choose the same title as my book, I went to her Author Page on Amazon. It was blank. Then I looked her up on LinkedIn. Nothing. Then I typed her name into Google. Zip. Then Facebook. Nada.


If I'd been able to connect with my book-title-twin author, who knows what might have happened? Maybe we'd have ended up sharing marketing stories. And ideas. And readers. Now we'll never know.


Are you easy to find online? If you're not making tons of money off your book(s), you should be, because you never know what opportunities might pass you by because no one can find you. Opportunities don't come around every day for authors, but if you're reading this post then you already know that.


Even if you do nothing else to market your book, why not fill in your Amazon Author Page and provide some contact information? It's so easy. And it's free! It's not like you're giving away your Social Security number and your mom's maiden name. A simple email address will do. If you're worried about being deluged with messages, you can set up a specific email address just for this purpose.


Here's a link that explains how to complete your Amazon Author Page.

Here's what mine looks like.


What are you waiting for? Do it!


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing Tip: Set up an Author Page on Amazon

Have you created your Amazon Author Page yet?

1,451 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, self-publishing, promotions, author_central
3

Until recently I had no idea how easy it is to make an audiobook. My publisher always took care of that, so I didn't pay much attention. For my latest novel, however, my publisher decided not to make an audiobook, so I decided to do one myself. Here's how the process works:


1. Go to ACX and set up an account.

2. Search for your book using your name, the book's title, or its ISBN.

3. Claim ownership of your book.

4. Upload your cover.

5. Set parameters for how and how much you want to pay.

o    Options include splitting royalties with the narrator or paying the narrator a fee per completed hour.

o    Top-notch narrators charge around $300 per completed hour. My most recent book is 250 pages and about six-and-a-half hours spoken.

6. Solicit auditions for narrators to read a few pages of your book.

o    You will receive an email each time you have a new audition to review.

7. Choose the narrator you want. (I chose the talented Amy McFadden, who narrated one of my earlier books.)

8. After the narrator is finished, you can listen to the entire thing on ACX and either approve it or request changes.

9. Once you approve the audiobook, you pay the narrator (I used PayPal).

10. The narrator indicates to ACX that he/she has been paid.

11. ACX distributes your audiobook through Audible, Amazon, and iTunes under both exclusive and non-exclusive contracts. If you grant non-exclusive distribution rights, then you can distribute through additional channels.

12. Each retailer independently prices your audiobook, generally based on its length.

13. Track sales through your author dashboard on ACX.

14. Get paid royalties monthly via direct deposit.


That's it! If you have any other questions about the process, let me know in the comments. If there are enough, I'll ask my narrator Amy to answer them in a future post.


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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