Skip navigation
1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 ... 16 Previous Next

Resources

229 Posts tagged with the publishing tag
2

Does Grammar Matter?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 30, 2010

Jane Friedman of the "No Rules" blog has an interesting post about grammar called Why I Don't Care About Grammar (and Why You Should Stop Worrying). As you can tell from the title, she's a little fed up by sticklers for perfect grammar. She makes the very salient point that possessing a knack for perfect grammar does not make you a good storyteller. On the contrary, in some cases, perfect grammar can actually ruin a story by preventing a writer from becoming immersed in his or her fictional world. I've written stories about small Southern towns (my heritage), and frankly, having my characters and narrators use perfect grammar would have betrayed the stories.

 

You have to capture the culture of your fictional story in order to suck people into it. Culture is hidden in the language we use, not just in fiction, but in real life, too. Good fiction is rooted in realism. If you want to give your characters realistic depth, design their world with the language that brings their culture to life, not the language that will make your eighth grade grammar teacher happy. If you're writing a romance novel about two English professors who fall in love, perfect grammar would definitely be necessary. But if you're writing about a blue-collar worker who never made it past the fourth grade, your reader's not going to expect him to speak using the King's English.

 

That's not to say you should be reckless with your writing. Giving yourself license to use poor grammar shouldn't mean you're allowing yourself to get sloppy and show a total disregard for the rules of grammar. I'm simply saying that you shouldn't allow grammar to get in the way of your creativity or a good story. Be true to the story first, and then follow the rules of grammar when it's appropriate.

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

A Good Writer Can Ruin a Good Story

5 Tips for Instantly Improving Your Novel

3,209 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, self-publishing, writers, publishing, writing, story, english, grammar
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing


     Do You Have a Marketing Plan, or Do You Have a Business Plan? - Self-Publishing Review

Writer Dan Halloway wonders if you're the "one and done" type of author, or are you in it for the long haul? 

 

     "Be A Great Author" Tips Using Publicity and Media Strategy - Book Publishing News

There is a thin line between a good author and a great author. Are you ready to cross it?


Film


     7-Step Film Directing Formula - Film Directing and Film Making Tips for the Independent Filmmaker

Filmmaker Peter D. Marshall unveils his secrets to directing a film. It's easy if you just take it one step at a time. 

 

     WHY I MADE A MOVIE IN MY UNDERWEAR - Making Of

How do you make an actor comfortable who has to do a scene in his underwear? You direct in your underwear, of course. Learn more behind-the-scenes tidbits from filmmaker Adam Reid.


Music

 

     The Elements of Jazz Guitar Explained - Music After 50

The heart of jazz is all about improvisation, but does jazz have commercial appeal? Jazz guitarist Chuck Anderson thinks it could.

  

     Tupac, Meet Mama Rose: Immortality for Some Sounds of the Past - New York Times Arts Beat

What do hip hop star Tupac and country music legend Loretta Lynn have in common? They've been added to the Library of Congress's National Recording Registry.


-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - June 22, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - June 15, 2010 Edition

1,948 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, music, filmmaking, film, self-publishing, promotion, indie, movies, writers, publishing, writing, films, promotions, musicians, craft, filmmakers
2

What I'm about to reveal to you is as guerrilla as you can get when it comes to spreading the word about a book. And make no mistake about it, that's really what marketing amounts to: spreading the word. Sometimes I think that's forgotten in the torture and turmoil of putting a marketing plan together. We tend to focus on the how, and we don't spend nearly enough time developing the message we're trying to spread. Ultimately your message is very simple - "Read my book!" Notice I didn't say "Buy my book!" Why? Because people who buy your book won't necessarily spread the word about your book. A large number of people who buy books don't always finish them, so the act of buying a book doesn't ensure they will read it and spread the word for you. It sounds counterintuitive, but there's more value for you if someone reads your book (even if they didn't pay for it) than if they buy it and never crack the cover. Ultimately, the readers are going to generate buyers for you. That's why your message is "Read" not "Buy."

 

So, with that in mind, I am aggressive about giving away copies of my books. And, I'm not just talking about family and friends; I give books away to complete strangers. I give books away to people I never even meet. How? I print up labels that say "Read it! Review it! Pass it on!" Then I place the label on the inside cover of the book with a note from me directing them to the Web sites where they are welcome to post reviews, and then I place the books in coffee shops, laundry mats, motel lobbies, cafeterias, etc. If it's a place where people sit and wait, I've been known to leave a book there. In most cases, the managers of the establishments don't mind, but I do make it a point to ask just in case.

 

Does it work? I honestly couldn't tell you. It's a guerrilla tactic that leaves me with no way of measuring its effectiveness. I like to think that the people who discover the books feel as though they've gotten lucky or they've found some hidden treasure and that will add to their excitement, but I've never met anyone who's been the recipient of one my "Read it! Review it! Pass it on!" books. Hopefully, someday I will, and the first thing I'm going to do is thank them for reading my book.

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Do You Have a Marketing Partner?

Coffee And Books

5,512 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, self-publishing, promotion, indie, sales, writers, publishing, writing, promotions, branding
0

No One Bats 1,000 When It Comes to Writing

We've all looked at some of our writing and had a "What was I thinking?" moment. Writers don't always end up writing the perfect story. In fact, you may fail more than you succeed. But, is writing a bad story really a failure? Writing instructor John Smolens doesn't think so. He learned from his mentor, Andre Dubus, that those so called "failures" may be stepping stones to finding your voice.

 

Students are keenly aware of this, the inconsistency of their work, the inexplicable failure of some stories to reach the level they intended. They don't know what to do about such stories; they can't find the flaw (or flaws) and provide a satisfactory fix. Perhaps they shouldn't try; perhaps they should view these weaker stories as the attempts that buttress the stronger pieces in the collection. Instead of declaring such stories failures, I urge my students to consider them as experiments that were not entirely successful - and to look for what did work within them. Maybe it's the voice of the piece, or the dialogue or a narrative passage. Or maybe it's a particular scene where a minor character suddenly comes to life (and if so, maybe the student should try another story, one focusing on that character instead).


You can read the entire article on Writer's Digest's website: There's No Such Thing as a Failed Story

 

 

Conventional Thinking Rarely Lands That Creative Gig

Looking for a job in filmmaking? Or maybe you're trying to get funding for your next film or video project. Perhaps you've tried every traditional method you know to get that job or find that investor, but nothing is working? Well, according to James Caan of the private equity firm Hamilton Bradshaw, it's because you're using traditional methods in a situation that calls for unconventional thinking.

 

If you're coming to a dead end, maybe it's time to look for alternative routes. People in this business are known for their ingenuity, originality and creative problem-solving. Why not go against the traditional grain for funding and start getting innovative? It could open up a world of opportunities.


You can read the entire article on the Telegraph's website: Applying for a creative job? Be creative.

 

 

"When a CD Comes Along, You Must Market It!"

After a 20-year hiatus, Devo has re-entered the music business with a new CD, and they've discovered that things aren't the same as when they left. There's a lot more music available for sale than there used to be, and there are also many more ways to promote and sell your music. But according to founding member Gerald Casale, none of it matters if you're not marketing your music.

 

"What's happened is that so many CDs are put out per month, possibly 10,000 a month. Nobody can possibly even know half the music that exists out there. And so marketing is everything. Marketing is the end-all, be-all of our society."


You can listen to the entire interview with Casale on American Public Radio's Marketplace: Devo on de-evolution, devalued music

 

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - June 18, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - June 11, 2010

1,288 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, music, filmmaking, film, self-publishing, promotion, indie, movies, writers, publishing, writing, musicians, craft, filmmakers
0

I am about to be judged, and I have no one to blame but myself. I uploaded the files for my latest book last night, and I have traded the stress of finishing the book for the stress of waiting for feedback from my readers. Such is the life of a self-published author. We are a breed unlike any other type of author. We truly embody the definition of independence. We do not have a team of editors or marketers or handlers. We have ourselves and, if we're lucky, a small group of family and friends who believe in us.

 

But I like it that way. It's somewhat empowering to know that the buck stops with me. The triumphs and missteps are both equally mine. I've consulted with editors and readers about my manuscript, but I ultimately made the decision to listen to their advice or disregard it.

 

That is a kind of freedom my traditionally published author friends don't get to enjoy. They are under contract and obligated to submit a book to their publisher's liking even if it clashes with their own sensibilities.

 

Despite dealing with the stress of absorbing all the critical focus, I love being an indie author. There's an odd sense of pioneering pride one gets by going it alone. If I fail, I fail on my own terms. I didn't wait to take action. I took it when I wanted to publish and with the book I wanted to publish... I feel like I should quote something from Rudy or Braveheart here, but perhaps that would be a little too much. Let me just end this rambling pep talk that you didn't ask for by saying embrace the stress of being independent. You're doing something a lot of people don't have the courage to do: believing in yourself. And that's worth stressing about.

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...


The Value of Rejection

You Have More Than One Book Inside of You

876 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, self-publishing, promotion, indie, writers, publishing, writing, craft
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

     It's Never Too Late to Start Writing - There Are No Rules

What do you do with 35 years between you and your last writing assignment? You start writing again.


     #163 - Query Shark

Want to see an example of an almost perfect query letter? Look no further than example #163.


Film


     Guerrilla Filmmaking Tips for Micro-budget Filmmakers - Learn Film Online Blog

An abundance of passion for filmmaking can overcome a lack of cash. You just have to do what you do best: be creative.

 

     YouTube Play - YouTube

Want a chance to showcase your filmmaking skills at the Guggenheim Museum? Check out YouTube's Play competition.

 

Music

 

     Giving Music Consumers These 3 Choices Leads to More Revenue - Hypebot

Variety is not only the spice of life; it's also the key to selling more of your music to the public. Bob Baker explains.


     Top 10 Music-Based Facebook Apps - Indie Music Tech

Still trying to find the perfect music app for your Facebook profile? Look no further. Indie Music Tech is here with a list of the top 10 music apps.


Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

 

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - June 15, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - June 8, 2010 Edition

1,485 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, selling, book, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, promotion, movies, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, films, musicians, craft, filmmakers
1

You shouldn't look at other authors as competition. On the contrary, you should look at them as colleagues who can help you sell books. Over the years I've talked to a lot of authors about a lot of marketing ideas and strategies, and I have always been especially intrigued by authors who have worked together to help sell books for each other. How? By pooling their resources, and engaging in book signing events. Here are a few examples of what I'm talking about.

 

  • A group of seven or eight independent authors created a bus tour with a regionally owned department store chain and hit the road for a few weeks making group appearances and selling books. Each author shouldered the expenses equally. They even ended up making long-term friendships with each other. 

 

  • Two western romance novelists have gone on periodic flea market tours in the Southeast for a few years now, and they seem to be having the time of their lives. They're selling books and getting to know their target audience first hand.

 

  • A couple of authors teamed up and wrote a children's book together and then decided to take their partnership one step further. They paid a costume designer to make costumes based on the characters in their book, and then rented a kiosk in a mall for a month with local high school students gathered around the kiosk wearing the costumes. Lucky youngsters got their picture taken with the characters and a signed copy of the book at a very reasonable price.  

 

The lesson here is just because you're an independent author doesn't mean you have to go it alone when it comes to marketing your book. Chances are there are other self-published authors in your area. Put out feelers. Get to know them, and start helping each other sell books.

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Be of Service to Other Writers

Ask For Referrals

2,661 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, selling, book, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, publishing, writing, promotions
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How Travel Renews Your Writing Life - There Are No Rules

Need a little spark to get those creative juices flowing? It might be time for a vacation to bombard the senses with some adventure and relaxation.


Writing Fiction: Can it be Done? - Living a Life of Writing

Freelance writer and blogger Rebecca E. steps out of the world of nonfiction and wonders if it?s possible for anyone to write fiction.


Film

 

Iron Man 2 Robot Repulsor Arm : How to : BFX - Backyard FX

It would take a lot of money to duplicate just some of the simplest effects in Iron Man 2, right? Not according to this nifty special effects tutorial put together by the BackyardFX team.

 

Tribeca Film Festival: Can Social Media Help 'Indie' Filmmakers Make It Big? - FilmSlate

The film industry is all about the buzz. The Internet has changed the way buzz is generated for films. A panel at the Tribeca Film Festival took on the topic of building buzz in a social media driven world.

Music

 

Auto-synchronization of Metronomes - Synthgear

Call it the great metronome experiment of 2010. Five metronomes started at different times remarkably begin to swing in unison.


Songwriter Voice vs Performance Voice... Do You Know The Difference? - Judy Rodman

According to Judy Rodman, the voice you use to write a song is different than the voice you use to perform a song.


Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

1,545 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, film, self-publishing, movies, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, musicians, filmmakers
0

The Reader's Guide

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 14, 2010

I've been asked by a couple of educators on different occasions if there were teacher's guide versions of my books available for sale, and I've kicked myself every time I've had to answer no. Besides the obvious reason that it could be a second source of income for me, it's also one less obstacle for me getting my books into schools on a wider scale. Publishers make it a regular practice to create study guides for their young adult titles for that very reason. They know that school boards and teachers build their budgets around books that will generate discussion and foster a love for reading. A title that comes with a blueprint of discussion topics makes the teacher's job that much easier, and they are more likely to include that book on their reading list.

 

I discussed the situation with my agent recently, and she suggested I take it one step further and create a general reader's guide for book clubs. It makes perfect sense. In addition to providing a list of topics to discuss for the group, it also signals the author's interest in promoting the book club environment and may even result in you receiving an invitation to speak with the book club. I've had the opportunity to do just that, and it was loads of fun. I highly recommend it.

 

Reader's guides aren't just another source of income. They are marketing tools in and of themselves. Simply by having a reader's guide you are planting the seed that your book would make an excellent selection for a group discussion, and it also gives you something to give to teachers and book club organizers that stands out from other book suggestions they receive.

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

881 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, book, self-publishing, writers, publishing, writing, promotions, teachers
1

AAUGH! Rewrites!

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 9, 2010

I am in the middle of rewrites at the moment. I always think I'm prepared for the process, but every time I learn that one can never be fully prepared to find cringe-worthy passages in one's own writing. Rewrites are the very definitions of arduous and humiliating. There are times I just can't bring myself to read one more page without a long break that involves chocolate or some baked good that soothes my writer's wounds.

 

So, is it worth the tedium, horror, and extra pounds to rewrite? Without question, yes. I find too many times that self-published authors either don't do extensive rewrites or they don't do rewrites at all before publishing their book. Huge mistake. Rewrites can do more than help you track down typos. More importantly, they can help you catch holes in your writing and story. When you're working on a manuscript that's tens of thousands of words long, you're no doubt going to make errors that can leave the readers scratching their heads. For instance, I inserted a scene to pursue a plot device, but as I continued writing I determined the plot device didn't work. The problem was that my focus then turned to completing the book, and I put the now useless and dead-end scene out of my mind. Of course, I found it going through rewrites and cut it. Had I decided to take the path of least resistance and self-publish the book without looking back or only giving the manuscript a skimming over, I would have sent a subpar product to market.

 

Rewriting is the least fun part of publishing a book, but in my mind, it is the most important phase of the process. It's so important I don't think you can do it alone. You need an editor or a reader you trust to go through your manuscript and ask you the tough questions about your writing style and your story. Give them the freedom to slash and burn your manuscript without getting defensive. You'll have a better book for it.

 

I have to go now. My first draft and a sleeve of chocolate chip cookies are waiting for me.

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

You may also be interested in...

 

5 Tips for Instantly Improving Your Novel

Does Grammar Matter?

9,318 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, editing, self-publishing, writers, publishing, writing, drafts, typos, craft, rewrites, chocolate
0

Book marketing is as much about keeping up with trends and scouring the internet for the latest developments in all things marketing as it is about implementing your own marketing plan. It's important to know not just what's going on in publishing, but also what's going on in the world of marketing. To that end, a plethora of websites and blogs out there offer book marketing gems of varying worth. Here are five sites that I have found to have a lot of valuable tips and tricks for authors interested in selling more books.

 

John Kremer's Book Marketing Tip of the Week - John is an expert's expert in the field of marketing for books. He's a best-selling author who is probably best known for his book 1001 Ways to Market Your Books. He has all of his past marketing newsletters archived, where you will find a virtual catalogue of useful tips to boost your marketing efforts.

 

Author Marketing Experts - Penny Sansevieri has 15 years' experience in the field of book promotion. She works as a consultant and publicist for an impressive list of authors. The name of her site alone suggests she understands that it's more about marketing the author than the book.

 

The Creative Penn - Joanna Penn, a Brit in Australia, dishes out plenty of sound advice on her site for today's author. She covers the gamut when it comes to books, but she devotes a lot of her virtual space to examining the world of marketing books and authors.

 

Gary Vaynerchuk - If you like your marketing expert to be dull and timid, then Gary is not the guy for you. He is the epitome of high energy, and he funnels all that energy into videos about the world of internet marketing. You'll be entertained and informed just by spending a few minutes with Gary every week.

 

Social Media Examiner - Founded by Michael Stelzner, this online magazine is geared toward helping businesses master the art of using social media, but there are a lot of great tips for authors trying to build a personal brand, as well. You can keep up with strategies and new tools to help get you noticed on social media sites.

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

1,304 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, selling, book, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, branding
0

Self-publishing a book is fun. I can speak from personal experience because I have five books I've self-published, and I have a sixth one on the way. I have enjoyed every minute of it, even this part of it where I get to write about how much I enjoy self-publishing. I have talked to a lot of other authors who have self-published one book, and I am always saddened when they inform me that they won't be doing a second book for no other reason than they don't think they have a second book inside of them.

 

I'm here to tell you that you do have a second book inside of you. In fact, I'm of the opinion that you have countless ideas for books swimming around in that head of yours. You got through the monumental task of writing and publishing a book. Don't let that experience go to waste. Write a second book... and a third... and a fourth... and... you get the point.

 

Where is that next idea for another book going to come from? I can't say for sure, but I can tell you one place to look: in the book you've already published. If you're like me, there are a number of characters in your book beyond the protagonist that you think deserve a story of their own or maybe even the same story but from their point of view. There are stories hidden within the story you've already written and published. Why not flesh them out and give them pages of their own? I'm not talking about creating a series (although that's not a bad idea). I'm talking about creating a spin-off book. This isn't just limited to works of fiction, by the way. I researched a historical figure recently, and discovered an even more fascinating character that could be the subject of his own book.

 

You have more than one book inside of you. You owe it to yourself as a writer to get it on paper and make it available to your present and future fans.

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

2,960 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, self-publishing, writers, publishing, writing, craft
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

     Fantastic Book Marketing: A Great Example - Publetariat

Author and blogger Joanna Penn examines the marketing efforts of author P.W. Singe after her husband was motivated to purchase his latest book.

 

     Three Steps to a Breakout Story - Plot to Punctuation

Want to write a compelling novel that will leave people in awe of your storytelling talent. According to editor Jason Black it's all in the goals you set for your story.


Film

 

     reddit.com Interviews Felicia Day - reddit

Television and Web series star Felicia Day answers questions from her fans and discusses her online strategies to succeeding the film industry.

 

     Negotiating Is a Producer's Life - All About Indie Filmmaking

Producer Jane Kelly Kosek sums up the key to developing your most crucial skill as a producer in one word, experience.

 

Music


     A Brief History of the Blues in Modern Music - 1960s Psychedelic Hippie Culture and Music

You need more that sweet lowdown lyrics to make a Blues song. You need that bluesy sound that only a guitar can make.

 

     Everybody is a Music Maker - Indie Music Tech

Digital Music guru Dave Haynes examines the history and future of music at a TEDxCardiff event.



Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

707 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, musicians, craft, filmmakers
0

How to Keep the Fires of Publicity Burning after the Newness is Gone

Your book may have been on the market for months or years, and you may feel its newsworthiness has run its course, but according to Arielle Ford, your book may still have some life left in it. In this age of print-on-demand, books stay relevant much longer than they did when they were subject to the finite nature of print runs. One of Ford's suggestions for keeping your book afloat:

 

Take advantage of the headlines: Contact your local media outlets immediately after hearing that a topic relevant to your book has made headlines. The local stations usually like to put a local spin on any national or international topic.

 

You can read find more of Arielle Ford's tips in the Huffington Post: How to Sustain Big Buzz for Your Book

 

 

Indie Films Ride the Wave of the Digital Revolution

There's no question about it. Digital technology has broken down the barriers for a lot of would-be filmmakers into the film industry. It's made even the most sophisticated pieces of equipment accessible to even the least affluent directors and storytellers. What was it like for filmmakers before the digital age? According to the JJDMTheMoive.com it was a financial struggle.

 

Before the advent of digital alternatives, the cost of professional film equipment and stock was also a hurdle to being able to produce, direct, or star in a traditional studio film. The cost of 35 mm film is outpacing inflation: in 2002 alone, film negative costs were up 23%, according to Variety.


You can read the entire article here: Independent Filmmaking outside of Hollywood

 

 

The Great White Way is Rockin'!

Broadway has become decidedly more rock and roll as of late. While your dreams of rock and roll stardom may be full of visions of stadium shows, music videos and limos, you just might find yourself participating in a Broadway musical someday. Who knows, you may event take home a few Tonys. This is from the New York Times:

 

Electric guitars onstage, not mini-orchestra-pit bands, drive all four of this year's Tony nominees for best musical: "American Idiot," "Fela!," "Memphis" and "Million Dollar Quartet." Their music bypasses Tin Pan Alley for punk, funk, rhythm-and-blues and rockabilly. And this year's rock musicals aren't alone; they have been sharing the theater district with a celebratory revival of the foundational rock musical, "Hair," and with entrenched jukebox shows like "Jersey Boys" and "Rock of Ages."

 

You can read the entire article here: Broadway Rocks. Get Over It.

 

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

1,579 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, book, music, promotion, indie, movies, sales, writers, publishing, writing, craft, filmmakers
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing


     How to Build an Audience Around Your Blog - Blogussion

An author blog doesn't just need traffic. It needs an audience. Here are 5 tips to create traffic and build an audience for your blog.

 

     The One Sentence, One Paragraph, and Two Paragraph Pitch - Nathan Bransford

Your job as an author isn't just writing books. As much as you may not like hearing it, you have to write summaries of you book, as well.


Film


     How to Make the Move to Hollywood - Joke and Biagio

Hollywood producer Biagio shares five tips on how to successfully make the transition from Main Street, USA to Tinseltown.

 

     Zach Braff Discusses Acting and Directing - Making Of

Actor and director Zach Braff discusses the difficulties he faced when making his movie Garden State. His key to pulling it off was to ignore the naysayers.

 

Music


     Woody Norris: Inventing the Next Amazing Thing - Ted Talks

This TED video features what might be the greatest invention in audio since the phonograph. Wood Norris has invented a device that doesn't use a speaker to project sound. It uses the air next to your ear.

 

     Science Friday on Perfect Pitch - How To Practice

Ever wonder how perfect pitch works? Are you the one in 10,000 that has perfect pitch? Here's an interesting piece on the science behind perfect pitch.

 

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

1,809 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, selling, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, filmmakers
1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 ... 16 Previous Next

Actions