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18 Posts tagged with the reading tag
2

When I first signed with a literary agent several years ago, she told me to read as much as I could because it would improve my own writing. I never forgot that advice, and while I have always loved to read, after that I began to read with a different eye.

 

I enjoy a variety of genres and always have a book on my nightstand (or on my Kindle), and with each one I learn something that positively affects my own work. Sometimes it's the way an author uses details such as colors, sounds, or smells to enrich a description, or the way I'm drawn into a chapter by a subtle hint that something terrible is going to happen, or how I find myself caring about a particular character due to the way the author shares interesting nuggets about his or her past. (I've said here before that quirks make characters real, and one reason I so strongly believe that is because of how I've responded to characters as a reader, not just because of how my readers have responded to characters I've created.)

 

Another way reading helps me is by expanding my vocabulary. Much like the way I speak, with each novel I write I find myself reaching for the same words and phrases because they're familiar to me, and the force of habit is strong! Now I keep a notebook by my bed when I'm reading and jot down words or descriptions that jump out at me as unusual, interesting, or flat-out unfamiliar. I love the Kindle because I can look up a word's meaning simply by pressing the screen--and when I'm reading a paperback I keep a good ol' fashioned dictionary handy.

 

They say to be a writer you should (try to) write every day. Toss in some reading, and you're on your way!

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Want to Improve Your Writing? Read!

Does Writing Change the Author?

1,898 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, self-publishing, writing, characters, reading, author_advice, writting_exercises
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Get in Good with Goodreads - Writer's Digest

Veteran author Michael J. Sullivan shares his secrets to Goodreads success.           

                           

Reader Question: Grammar, Second Languages, and Book Soundtracks - All Indie Writers

Poor grammar and typos in your marketing material can cost you readers.         

 

Film

                                                        

Top Five Things I've Discovered about Promoting a Low Budget Children's Film - Projector Films

Be relentless, and be prepared for the long haul.     

                                          

The 11 Principles of Leadership for Filmmakers - Studio Binder

Know thyself, and know thy craft. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Nine Reasons a Guitar Pickup Sounds the Way It Does - Bobby Owsinski's Big Picture Music Production Blog

What seems simple can actually mean everything when it comes to tone.  

  

How to Use Craigslist to Book Music Gigs - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

Can a free site help find paying gigs?  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- April 3, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- March 27, 2015

2,510 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, book, music, filmmaking, author, self-publishing, promotion, indie, movies, writing, guitar, promotions, reading, musicians, filmmakers, social_media, music_industry, grammar_tip, grammar_advice, music_gigs, music_shows
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For an upcoming release, I used a fairly large group of beta readers before my final round of rewrites. Now, the dangerous thing about using beta readers is that you're selecting readers who are fans of your previous books. In the wrong environment, these readers may be reluctant to give you their honest opinions in an effort to stay in your good graces. So, I decided to give this group of beta readers the ability to provide feedback anonymously. I set up a survey with 13 elements of the book that they could rate on a scale of 1 to 5. I also gave them the option to leave a comment on each element they were asked to rate. In addition, they could leave a comment at the end of the survey to give their overall impression of the book.

 

This system worked beautifully. I got a lot of constructive feedback that helped tremendously during the final round of rewrites. The key for me was to know what needed to be addressed. Of the 13 areas, eight would only apply to my story, but five could be used for almost any book. I'll share them here, and I invite you to use them should you decide to use this method with beta readers.

 

  1. Character: Please rate main and secondary characters as a whole. (I went on to describe my style of revealing character)

  2. Plot: Besides being the catalyst for action and dialog, the plot has to be worth investing time in and has to be delivered in a compelling manner. Given all that, how would you rate the execution of the plot?

  3. Setting: The setting is a small fictional Southern town at the base of an unknown mountain range in Tennessee. Various other communities featured in the book are located on the slopes of those mountains. The author attempted to establish a ruggedness and sense of isolation both in the terrain and through the secondary characters of these small communities. Based on these criteria, how would you rate the setting of this book?

  4. The Final Conflict: The final conflict takes place in?(a location specific to my story). At the conclusion of this scene, readers should not have any remaining questions about the main plot: who was involved, the extent of the crime committed, and the plan to address it moving forward, etc. Based on these criteria, how would you rank the final conflict?

  5. The Ending: How would you rank the ending?

 

Together with the other eight questions in the survey, I was able to address problem areas. Having so much input before the release of a book has really set me at ease. I'm usually a bundle of nerves just before a book goes live, but now I'm more confident than I've ever been about a new book. And, I wouldn't feel this way without my beta readers.

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

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Fix It in Rewrites

Thank the People Who Help You

4,655 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, self-publishing, readers, setting, writing, story, characters, drafts, plot, reading, craft, social_media, author_advice, writintg_tips
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Much has been written about what reading a novel does to the brain. One study featured by The Atlantic showed that reading certain words associated with odors can trigger the part of the brain devoted to smell. Another study showed that reading a novel can change the structure of a brain. For example, reading about riding a bicycle can activate the parts of a brain that are used when physically riding a bicycle. In short, reading a novel can open the reader up to experiencing a kind of non-physical reality that is completely created by the author.

 

 

If reading can have that kind of effect on the reader, imagine what it can do for the writer. During my best writing moments, I slip into a trance that in many ways makes me feel removed from this world, a kind of Fringe-like alternate universe. The structure of my brain must be constantly under construction as if it's the Winchester mansion adding wing after wing with no end in sight.

 

 

Personally, I feel like my worldview has expanded a great deal over the years that I have followed the stories in my head. Some would argue that it's a natural process of aging and maturing, and while I can't say for sure that writing is what changed me, I lean in that direction. For no other reason than I know of, we are shaped by our experiences and thanks to my writing, I have experienced things that I haven't physically experienced. It's a wild concept that can leave you a little dizzy.

 

What about you? Do you feel your writing has changed you in any way?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Thank the People Who Help You

Make Your Own Rules

2,639 Views 4 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, publishing, writing, reading, craft, author_brand
2

Let's go over a checklist. You've got an author bio on your blog. Check. You've got an author photo. Check. You've got information about your book or books. Check. Your blog is updated with new posts on a regular basis. Check. Congratulations! You've completely utilized your blog to build your author brand.

 

But wait…There does seem to be something missing. What have people said about your book? Visitors to your blog may find that information useful. In fact, it may be the determining factor that prompts them to click on the link to buy the book.

I know you probably have reviews you're proud of on the detail page for your book on Amazon. That's great. And, you may have even been contacted via email by readers who've had glorious things to say about your book. And, you may have even gotten lovely comments from friends and followers on social media sites. That is terrific. But why haven't you drawn attention to those comments on your blog?

 

You should have a section on your blog devoted to reviews or testimonials. Source the comment and attribute it to the reader. Ask permission when possible. In most cases, it's not technically necessary, but they're more than likely to be flattered that you want to highlight their comments on your blog.

 

Potential readers want to know what actual readers are saying about your book(s). Don't make them hunt for that information on your blog. Give testimonials a prominent space on your author platform.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Read It Forward

Let Your Excitement Show

3,361 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: blog, sales, writers, review, readers, blogging, reading, author_blog, reader_review, online_review
9

Read It Forward

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 21, 2014

Have you read a good book lately? How about a good book by an indie author? I'll admit to not having read enough indie books. It's a serious shortcoming that I'm not proud of. I am an indie author – I should be participating as a reader in the same arena where I participate as a writer.

 

We, as indie authors, have a responsibility to build up the indie market's reputation. I don't mean we should shower each other with false praise and disingenuous hype; I mean we should wade through the indie offerings and showcase those gems we stumble upon, just as we would a book in the traditional publishing world. We need to make the indie market a story-worth-reading friendly environment.

 

If we aren't good citizens of our own indie world, how can we expect the average reader to embrace us? The more indie books of exceptional quality that we shine a light on, the bigger the readership grows for all of us. In other words, if we read it forward, there will be big dividends for all indie authors.

 

In response to this post, I know the temptation will be to pepper the comments and retweets with a plug for your own book. It's a natural response. I get it, but I'm going to encourage you not to do that. Instead, start the read-it-forward ball rolling by plugging an indie book written by someone other than you. Give us a gem that you, as a reader, think is worthy of recommending. If we make such recommendations a habit, we all benefit and reap the rewards.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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A Basket Full of Books

Supporting Indie Authors

4,276 Views 9 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, promotion, writers, independent_publishing, reading, craft, branding, marketing_ideas, indie_authors
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One of my favorite stories is The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway. It's a classic written by a legendary literary figure. My love for the story is so strong I assumed everyone felt the same way. The Old Man and the Sea is universally loved, right?

 

Wrong. There are plenty of people who hate The Old Man and the Sea. It's tough for me to accept it now even though I just got through typing it in the previous sentence. It just seems wrong to me. But it is a truth I must face, especially after stumbling upon an article club called ?What Not To Read? on BookRiot.com. As their name indicates, they list what books they hated, and you, the reading public, shouldn't bother reading. Sitting at number five on their list was Mr. Hemingway's classic tale of an old man fighting to bring in the catch of his life to the show the boy he was still relevant, and he could still contribute something to this world.

 

I like Book Riot. It's something that's rare these days, a fun website devoted to the world of books. After getting over my initial shock of finding my favorite story on their list, I actually saw a silver lining in the literary diss. If a man who's so respected worldwide for his writing talent can make it on to such a list, why should I get upset over a bad review of one of my books? It's someone else's opinion. It doesn't mean they're right or wrong. It just means the book wasn't for them.

 

Book Riot's inclusion of The Old Man and the Sea on their list of books not to read doesn't diminish my love for the story, and a bad review of one of my own books doesn't diminish my passion for writing. The only thing to do is to keep my head down and keep publishing. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Bad Reviews & Great Company

Online Reviews: Just Say...Nothing

2,701 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, reviews, writers, writing, reading, book_reviews
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I love reading. I read on the subway, before I go to sleep, while waiting for various appointments - all the time! I read both fiction and nonfiction in a variety of genres. I'm not the fastest reader, but I'm always reading something. Not only do I read for education and entertainment, but also because reading other people's work makes me a better writer.

 

Reading good writing is inspiring and educational. When I run across a clever turn of words, or a vivid description that makes me feel like I'm right there with the characters, it motivates me to create a similar effect in my own work. When an author does a great job of developing a protagonist, I want to do the same with mine.

 

I learn from other authors by experiencing the impact of their work firsthand, i.e. as the reader. For example, if you react strongly to a particular scene, ask yourself why. Is it because the author uses a lot of details? Or does the dialogue ring true? Are there a lot of colors? Smells? Actions? Emotions? All of the above? There's no exact formula for writing a great story, just a lot of potential ingredients that - if mixed together correctly - could result in something special.

 

Reading a book you don't like can also help you improve for the same reason, just flipped around. Why don't you like it? What does the author do that bothers you? Pay attention to the answers, and then ask yourself if you do the same things in your own writing.

 

Writing is hard work, and it takes a lot of time to complete an entire book. I recognize that for many authors the idea of spending more time with words on a page, especially ones that aren't your own, might be the last thing you want to do. But I promise it's worth it.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, and Chocolate for Two. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Being an Obsessive Reader

 

The Most Powerful Word

8,980 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, author, writing, reading
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Brain Function 'Boosted for Days after Reading a Novel' -The Independent

How powerful is reading? It can change your brain.      

         

Doctors Prescribe Books to Treat Depression -GalleyCat

Read two books and call me in the morning. 

 

Film

                                                        

Five Days of 'Her': How to Shoot the Future - Los Angeles Times

Futuristic films don't always have to look futuristic. 

                                          

Super 8 Bounces Back with a New Professional Level Super8 Camera! Analogue Filmmaking is Back! - RedShark

Will 2014 be the year of Super 8 film?   

                                    

Music

 

Best of 2013: Top 10 Ways to Unclutter Your Band Website - Hypebot.com

You can make your website better, neater, and more efficient. 

 

Small Band is Big Business -Musicgoat

Indie is in. Do you know how to capitalize on obscurity? 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - January 3, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - December 27, 2013

2,674 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: website, filmmaking, production, business, music_marketing, reading, bands, music_production
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

 

Books/Publishing

 

 

How to Secure Raving Endorsements for Your Product or Service - Michael Hyatt

 

The first step is asking. It's also the hardest. Michael Hyatt shares his best tips for getting endorsements. 

 

 

LeVar Burton Reveals Reading Rainbow Follow-Up - GalleyCat

 

Is an updated version of the show that taught a generation to love books in the works?                         

 

 

Film

 

 

Brad Pitt Believes Age of Filmmaking Dominated by Big Studios is Over - newKerala.com

 

The man who conquered the studio system sees the future of film belonging to the independent filmmaker.                              

 

 

How to Apply "Show, Don't Tell" in Screenplays - Filmmaking Stuff

 

It's the one piece of advice that drives beginning writers crazy. Screenwriter Jurgen Wolff explains how to apply it to your screenplay.     

 

 

Music

 

 

Copyright is Valuable - 'The Birthday Song' earns $2 Million a year in royalties - artists house music

 

Time to dust off that Happy Tuesday song and start collecting royalties.         

 

 

New Instrument Alert: Björk's Gameleste - Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise

 

Sometimes you've just got to go that extra mile, like creating a new musical instrument to get the sound you want.

 

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 13, 2011 Edition

 

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 6, 2011 Edition

 

1,932 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, book, book, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, indie, indie, endorsements, endorsements, reading, reading, musicians, musicians, screenwriting, screenwriting, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Science Fiction/Fantasy Books Expected to Grow 3.4% in 2011 - Book Publishing News

The Harry Potter affect continues to influence the publishing industry. Looks like it's time to dust off that idea about aliens taking on witches and warlocks in a galactic war of awesomeness.

 

If "We Can't Teach Students to Love Reading," What Can We Teach? - big think

A thought-provoking piece on whether loving to read is something you're born with or something that can be taught.

 

Film

 

Dancing with the Devil - ABC North Coast NSW

It's the fear of every pure artist. How do you make it without selling out?

 

360 Degree Film - Projector Films

Move over 3-D films, there's a more mind-blowing technology on the way: 360-degree films.

 

Music

 

Do You Name Your Recording Studio? - wire to the ear

Oliver Chesler asks a pretty good question: if you're just going to be producing your own music, do you name your studio?

 

3 Tips for Better Social Music Video Marketing - Hypebot.com

It's more important to engage your audience than to push a product.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 23, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 16, 2011 Edition

1,735 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, sci-fi, sci-fi, recording, recording, reading, reading, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Read Faster with Spreeder - PWxyz

A pretty cool little application that trains you to read and comprehend faster.

 

What Is Distant Reading? - The New York Times

I've heard of not reading a book because you're waiting for the movie to come out, but Franco Moretti has a completely different strategy. He's waiting for the data to come out.

 

Film

 

Hi-Technical Knockout: Movie Games or Game Movies? - Diehard GameFAN

Which is better or worse: games based on movies or movies based on games?

 

Filmmaker Robert Rodriguez on Technology, Creativity, and the Need for "a Bigger Gun" - Geek Wire

The man who started his career with low-budget films talks about making the most of all your resources.

 

Music

 

Quick Tip for Low Notes - Judy Rodman

Having trouble getting down low with your vocals? Judy has a solution.

 

How 'Unbelieving' In Yourself Helps Finish Music - Mr. Tunes

Could too much confidence in your talent and skill be holding you back? Mr. Tunes offers a different theory on what it takes to get motivated.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - June 28, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - June 21, 2011 Edition

854 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, films, films, reading, reading, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Does Reading Lead to a New and Improved You?

What can reading a great novel do for you? Can it make you smarter, kinder, or more sensitive to the world around you? A new memoir by William Deresiewicz, A Jane Austen Education: How Six Novels Taught Me About Love, Friendship and the Things That Really Matter, seems to suggest that it can. The author believes that he is the man he is today because of Jane Austen. But Laura Miller with Salon.com takes issue with his assertion. In her words:

 

Does reading great literature make you a better person? I've not seen much evidence for this common belief. Some of the best-read people I know are thoroughgoing jerks, and some of the kindest and noblest verge on the illiterate - which is admittedly an anecdotal argument, but then, when it comes to this topic, what isn't?

 

You can read the entire article on Salon.com: Does reading great books make you a better person?

 

Sometimes Rejection Leads to Great Things

What do you do when you can't get your independent movie into a film festival? If you're Leslee Scallon and Michael Trent, you start your own film festival. They contacted 15 other independent filmmakers, called their festival "Dances With Films" and had a great time. When they had an after-festival party in their apartment and announced it was just a onetime affair, the other filmmakers in their makeshift festival begged them to keep it going.       

 

And so they continued. The 14th annual Dances With Films kicks off Thursday evening at Laemmle's Sunset 5 and continues through June 9. Billing itself as the "Last Independent Independent Film Festival," the event typically attracts 6,000 to 7,000 patrons during the week and includes an awards ceremony. The festival is funded by sponsorships, submissions, tickets and volunteers. "We range from about 1,100 to 1,400 submissions depending on the year," Scallon said. "We have shown films from all over the world. We had a film from India that was a one-minute short, and the filmmaker actually came in from India for the premiere."

 

You can read the entire article on the Los Angeles Times' website: Dances With Films was born of rejection

 

You Haven't Lived Until You've Rocked a Cemetery!

So the good news is you got a gig in Hollywood. The bad news is that gig is a cemetery. You read right. Bands have found a new venue to showcase their musical talents, a cemetery called Hollywood Forever. The grounds are home to some of the silver screen's biggest deceased legends, such as Rudolph Valentino, Douglas Fairbanks and Cecil B. DeMille. There are even a few legendary musical acts that call Hollywood Forever their final resting spot, but clearly the most astonishing thing about the cemetery is that bands are dying to play there (sorry, I had to do it).

 

One of the most popular recent shows at the cemetery was Austin's cinematic, instrumental experimenters Explosions in the Sky. The band's Munaf Rayani says of the experience, "Very rarely does one get a chance to play for the living and the dead. We were lucky to get the opportunity." The week before the performance, the cemetery opened its gates to a handful of visual artists, each of whom created a piece to accompany a song from Explosions' new album. The crowd roamed the park after dark listening to music among the gravestones.

 

You can read the entire article on the Los Angeles Times' website: Hollywood Forever comes alive with music

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - June 3, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - May 27, 2011

1,637 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, festival, festival, reading, reading, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, independent_film, independent_film
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What a Boy Wants

It's no secret that young female readers far outnumber young male readers. The question is why don't boys read? Unfortunately, there is no universal answer. There are indications that it is a cultural flaw. Most boys are taught that physical prowess is much more important that mental prowess during their developmental years. Others believe that it's a simple matter of there being more reading material created for girls than boys. Here's more on the topic from The Tennessean.

 

You've got your typical boys. Then bring in Kelly Miller, assuming the role of the relentless eighth-grade English teacher. She's determined to buck the odds and get all her students - boys and girls - to meet a goal of reading 30 novels this school year. Miller knew the same general facts that had troubled Calame: Boys read less than girls. Surveys show they're more likely to have a negative experience with books. And boys lag behind girls in reading skills.

 

You can read the entire article on The Tennessean's website: How do you get boys into reading? Girls

 

Wheeling and Dealing, Hitchcock-Style

Even the great ones must make compromises and promises to get their films made. And there is no greater one than Alfred Hitchcock. Hitchcock had heard the story of a man, Manny Balestrero, wrongly accused of committing a robbery. He was brought to trial where a mishap with a juror caused a mistrial, and that's when the great director got interested in the real-life story.

 

As "Manny" waited for a retrial, the real robber was arrested while trying to hold up a grocery store. With that arrest, "Manny" was exonerated. After hearing the story, Alfred Hitchcock decided to make a film. He created The Wrong Man and wanted to make the film as real as possible. He approached Judge Groat (the presiding judge) to see if the Court Room in the Queens County Court House could be made available to film a portion of the movie - just as it had happened in real life. Judge Groat said, "Yes, but with one condition." That "condition" required Alfred Hitchcock to speak at a local Young Republican Club.

 

You can read the entire article on AntonNews.com: Remembering Alfred Hitchcock

 

A Voice You Should Know

Every once in a while, a talent comes and goes from this planet that is just too good to let go by without acknowledging. Sadly, Phoebe Snow succumbed to illness at the young age of 60 and passed away last week. For those of you who don't know, Snow was a singer/songwriter who broke onto the music scene in 1974. She had a deeply rich and beautiful bluesy voice that she showcased perfectly with her haunting and moving songs. She gave up music to care for her disabled child. Even though it was a decision that most likely cost her millions of dollars and elite stardom, she never regretted it. Though her life and contribution to music were far too brief, she still left an indelible mark. 

 

Ms. Snow was discovered at the Bitter End in Greenwich Village in 1972 by Dino Airali, a promotion executive for Shelter Records, based in Tulsa, Okla. Mr. Airali and Phil Ramone produced her first record, which included guest performances by Zoot Sims, the Persuasions and Teddy Wilson. Besides "Poetry Man," the most striking original song on her debut album, "I Don't Want the Night to End," is about a lover named Charlie Parker (not the jazz saxophonist), who had died. The introspective, quirky coffeehouse torch-singing of that hit was a style she later largely abandoned to pursue various hybrids of hard rock, soul and gospel.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' websiteHypebot.com: Phoebe Snow, Bluesy Singer-Songwriter, Dies at 60

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - April 29, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - April 22, 2011

1,642 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, book, book, music, music, film, film, reading, reading, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Confluence of Pleasures: On Reading and Tuna Fish - The Millions

An essay about those moments when the right book finds you at the right time.     

 

Nonlinear Reading and Other Things Print Books Do Better Than E-books - PWxyz

Is this a case where the "analog" world outdoes the digital world when it comes to nonlinear "technology"?   

 

Film

 

The (Dreaded) Silent Role - A MOON Brothers film

Actors who pass on parts because of lack of dialogue may be missing out on the chance to deliver an Oscar-winning performance.              

 

Beyond a Social Network - The Independent

Yet another article about the changing face of film financing and the world of crowdsourcing.   

 

Music

 

Is the Dedicated Songwriter Going Extinct? - digital music news

The music industry is seeing the demise of songwriting as a reliable source of income. Now, songwriters are being asked to diversify in order to make a living.  

 

6 Things to Help Your Music Marketing This Week - Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

Get your notebooks out. Bob Baker is cranking out the free marketing tips.     

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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