Skip navigation
1 2 3 ... 5 Previous Next

Resources

67 Posts tagged with the sales tag
1

A sense of urgency

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 25, 2016

Limited Time Offer!

 

Offer Expires Soon!

 

Sale Ends Tomorrow!

 

While Supplies Last!


The above are examples of ad copy we've all seen before. Other than the exclamation point, they all have one thing in common. It's the ad world's version of "show; don't tell." Each slogan conveys the same feeling, and it's a feeling meant to move consumers to run to their favorite shop, virtual or actual, and buy, buy, buy. That feeling is a sense of urgency.


It is meant to leave consumers feeling as if they are about to miss out on an incredible offer. It is either stated outright or implied that time is running out. The sweetheart deals will soon be gone and those who miss out will be left with nothing but a sense of regret.


As you devise a strategy to bring awareness to your book or books, look for a way to build a sense of urgency into your messaging. Perhaps it's reduced pricing for your book. What better way to use this urgency strategy. Highlight the limited time of the price reduction, and make it clear daily in your social media circle that the time is growing shorter to take advantage of the sale price.


Or perhaps you want to give away a dozen signed copies of your book. Don't think that the giveaway is enough to entice readers. The sense that the signed copies are limited editions and will be gone soon is the real promotion. Hammer that point home.


Sometimes to sell books, you have to have time on your side. The best way to do that is to limit the amount of time readers can participate in a promotion for your book. Make them feel as if they are about to miss out on an incredible opportunity.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in…

 

Three marketing websites for authors

 

Guerrilla book marketing tactic

 

 

 

 

944 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, self-publishing, sales, promotions, social_media, how_to_promote
3

As I've mentioned before, I read a lot about book marketing and publishing. The other day I came across an article about an indie author who had recently published a novel about baseball. I love sports and thought his book sounded interesting, so I looked it up on Amazon. There were just two reviews, one of which was five stars and had the title: Great book. Among other glowing things, the review said the book was "a nice easy read for kids of all ages" and "well worth the time and money."


Then I noticed that the name of the reviewer looked strangely familiar. I scrolled to the top of the page and realized it was the same as the author! I couldn't believe someone would have the gall to give his own book a five-star review, but there it was, staring me in the face.


Needless to say, I didn't buy the book. How could I support such unethical behavior?


I've said more than once in this space that I believe asking friends and family to positively review your book is a bad idea. It puts them in an awkward position (what if they didn't like your book?), and it's just not credible. Reviewing your book yourself is even worse. Of course you think it's worthy of five stars; you wrote it! But that's beside the point. For reviews to mean anything, they need to be written by objective readers. That's the point of reviews.


The only time I think it's OK for a friend to write a review is if that person proactively tells you that he/she enjoyed your book. In that case, feel free to say, "Thank you! Would you mind putting that into a review?" Otherwise, don't do it. All you're going to do is shoot your credibility--and your sales--in the foot.


 

-Maria


 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

 

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


 

You may also be interested in...

Get Reviews for Your Indie Book

Dos and Don'ts of Soliciting Book Reviews

 

1,081 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, sales, writing, promotions, book_reviews
0

Competency

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 25, 2015

What makes someone successful? How does someone make it to that next level? It's a question I ask myself as an author all the time. How did famous author John Doe go from unknown to mid-list to well known? Is he a better writer than me? Is he luckier? Is he more handsome? When somebody makes it and you don't, you either pick apart their success or you pick apart your lack of success.

 

As somebody who's studied the issue ad nauseam, I think I've uncovered the formula for succeeding as an author. Talent and luck do play a factor, no doubt. But the driving force behind success for an author, for an athlete, for a politician, for a manager of a grocery store is competency. Knowing your craft, knowing the market, knowing your genre, knowing your readers, these are all the building blocks of competency. Competency doesn't happen by accident. It's a consequence of focus. Once you possess this competency, your marketing efforts will become a bit more effortless and a lot more effective.

 

Notice I didn't use the word confidence. Confidence and competency are two different things. You can be confident and lack competency. However, very few competent people lack confidence. So, yes, I think confidence is key to success, but only if it's born out of one's competence. Confidence without the competency anchor isn't a reliable ingredient for lasting success.

 

So, get the focus. Concentrate on improving your craft. Develop the curiosity to know your readers. Study your genre. Do these things, and the competency will follow. Soon after comes the success.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in…

How to be a Confident Writer

How to Find Success

1,200 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writing, success, craft, author_advice
3

When you try to please everyone, you please no one. Art thrives on honesty. Why? Because honesty allows for conviction, and conviction leads to pouring your heart and soul out onto the page. If you write to please the broadest number of people possible, you are most likely holding back when holding back is the last thing you should be doing. Holding back causes your writing to become thin and bland.

 

The temptation is to reach the largest number of people. Simple math suggests that if you've written something that has the potential to appeal to an enormous group of people, you're going to sell a lot of books. Logical, right? Unfortunately, logic has little to do with publishing. Publishing is an industry built on passion. People are passionate about the books they read and even more passionate about the books they recommend.

 

Narrow your focus. Stop trying to reach a broad audience. I know it sounds antithetical to creating a huge seller, but niche markets can be very profitable. For one thing, they allow you to more easily identify your audience. You'll know your demographic, where to find them, and how to communicate with them. That makes for a very effective marketing campaign. Another benefit is that members of these niche markets usually know one another. They either form groups or join online communities where they can share news and notes on their common interests. Your book can find fertile ground for viral sharing among these folks.

 

Stop trying to please everyone. Write a book that ignites your passion, and reap the rewards for reaching a niche market.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

What Makes a Book Readable?

It's Not Just a Hobby, It's a Marketing Opportunity

1,466 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, promotion, sales, seilling_books, marketing_campaign
5

Looking for a way to boost lagging sales? There's no magic bullet, but here are three strategies that may be the perfect solution for you.

 

  1. Cover Design: You've got a solid, compelling story. It's been edited by a professional or someone you know and trust. You're convinced that the pages between the covers contain every element a bestseller requires, but the sales don't come anywhere near your expectations. So if not the story, what's the issue? Maybe it's your cover. Authors aren't always designers, and what appeals to you may not appeal to your readers. Hand the cover design over to professional graphic artists and let them apply their talents to the package of your masterpiece.
  2. Multiple Formats: Gone are the days when a book may have had one or two iterations: paperback and hardcover. You are living in a world where there should be eBook, print, and audiobook versions of your book. To increase your chances for sales, providing the book in all three formats is a great strategy, and with today's technology, it's easier than ever to go the multiple formats route.
  3. Write More Books: Want to sell more copies of your first book? Write a second book and a third--and many more. The key to making it into today's publishing world is to have multiple offerings. Readers are met with a veritable cornucopia of choices when it comes to what book they'll read next. They are of two minds: making a safe choice or discovering a great new talent. As an indie author, you have the opportunity to satisfy both minds if you have a number of books for them to read. You can be that great undiscovered talent they know they can trust with a story.

 

Let's face it, selling books is hard, but by adapting the three strategies listed above, you can make things a little bit easier for yourself.

 

-Richard

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

You may also be interested in…

Selling Books is Hard!

Book Covers Can Affect Sales

6,964 Views 5 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, selling, sales, cover_design, increase_sales
0

Years ago in my life as a trainer for a piece of hardware used in the broadcasting industry, I was invited to the headquarters of the developer and manufacturer to get a pre-release rundown of the latest version of their product. They took the visiting trainers on a tour of their outrageously cool facility. Everything was modern and in pristine condition until we got to the engineering department. It was a mess. Computers and machines of various types were gutted and laid open like a macabre butcher shop for electronics. What were they doing?

 

They were reverse engineering the leading product in their field. They didn't want to reinvent the technology. They wanted to make it better, but they needed a reference point.

 

When you are developing a marketing strategy for your book, you should take the same approach. There's no reason to take a complete stab in the dark when there are millions of examples out there to be reverse engineered. Where do you start? Start with you.

 

What do I mean? Well, I'm guessing you've purchased a book before. Answer the question why you bought it, and you've reverse engineered a sale. You may discover that a friend told you about the book. Ask your friend why they bought the book. Keep chasing the sale down until you can build a profile of a sale. Once you see how a sale is more or less built, you get a better understanding of how the market works, and you'll be able to develop a marketing strategy that will be much more effective than blindly trying ideas.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

 

Host Your Own Webinar

Elements of the Author Brand

5,085 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, author, sales, social_media, marketing_ideas, marketing_strategy, marekting_tip
2

Let's go over a checklist. You've got an author bio on your blog. Check. You've got an author photo. Check. You've got information about your book or books. Check. Your blog is updated with new posts on a regular basis. Check. Congratulations! You've completely utilized your blog to build your author brand.

 

But wait…There does seem to be something missing. What have people said about your book? Visitors to your blog may find that information useful. In fact, it may be the determining factor that prompts them to click on the link to buy the book.

I know you probably have reviews you're proud of on the detail page for your book on Amazon. That's great. And, you may have even been contacted via email by readers who've had glorious things to say about your book. And, you may have even gotten lovely comments from friends and followers on social media sites. That is terrific. But why haven't you drawn attention to those comments on your blog?

 

You should have a section on your blog devoted to reviews or testimonials. Source the comment and attribute it to the reader. Ask permission when possible. In most cases, it's not technically necessary, but they're more than likely to be flattered that you want to highlight their comments on your blog.

 

Potential readers want to know what actual readers are saying about your book(s). Don't make them hunt for that information on your blog. Give testimonials a prominent space on your author platform.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

Read It Forward

Let Your Excitement Show

2,808 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: blog, sales, writers, review, readers, blogging, reading, author_blog, reader_review, online_review
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How Much Attention Should You Pay to Book Design? - The Book Designer

Designing your book inside and out is a crucial component in the indie author's journey.

                           

Becoming an Author - How Do You Spell Success? - The Future of Ink

In today's publishing world, the author doesn't just have control over their ability to succeed; they also have control over how to define success.     

 

Film

                                                        

The Long Take & the Tracking Shot - In Layman's Terms...

A look at how technology and evolving filmmaking techniques have changed the long take in movie making.    

                                          

Writing from Theme - Screenwriting from Iowa

Why summing your story up in one sentence can help you write more effectively.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

5 Mistakes Artists Make in Promoting Their Music - Intern Like a Rockstar

Do you know how to sell yourself and your music?

 

How to Create a Brand Identity Statement as an Artist - Bob Bakers TheBuzzFactor.com

Do you know how to tell fans and potential investors what kind of music you play? 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- June 27, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- June 20, 2014

2,020 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: filmmaking, formatting, book_design, movies, sales, musicians, screenwriting, filmmakers, book_sales, brand_identity, music_production, music_branding, film_production
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Use Breaking News to Buzz Your Book - Eight Strategies -The Future of Ink

Your opinion counts on matters you devoted your book to, so why doesn't the media know how to contact you?

 

3 Book Marketing Projects to Tackle in 2014 - Duolit

Make the year ahead a productive and fruitful one with these three marketing projects. 

 

Film

 

How to Turn That Passion for Writing and Filmmaking into a Reality - FAST - Raindance

Passion to action. Action to achievement. Achievement to reality.   

 

How Do You Define "Independent Film" in 2014? - Indie Wire

Technology has democratized the film industry and blurred the lines between studio, independent and no-budget filmmaking.     

                                    

Music

 

12 Ways to Make More Money with Your Music - Hypebot.com

Twelve music industry insiders share their best advice on how to bring in the cash with your music. 

 

How to Make It in the Music Business - Judy Rodman

Before you can know if you've made it, you have to define what "making it" is.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup - January 17, 2014

Weekly News Roundup - January 10, 2014

2,074 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, filmmaking, sales, writing, book_marketing, social_media, independent_film, music_business, music_production
1

Form an Author Co-op

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 13, 2014

I'm guessing a large number of people reading this are writers with friends and family who also write. You may even belong to a writers group. I'm also guessing that among your collective of writers there are those of you who have jumped into the world of indie publishing. In other words, you have numbers, and where there are numbers, there is strength.

 

Alone, you are one author trying to break through by finding the right branding formula that will lead to a boatload of book sales. It's a tall order when you're on your own to keep up with the latest and greatest marketing tools and techniques or what's on the horizon.

 

Consider this: Instead of being a one-author operation, why not team up with your fellow indie author friends and become a cooperative, a kind of authors group where you meet monthly and examine each other's marketing strategies? You can share insights on what's worked and what hasn't. You can guide each other through this maze. You can organize group signings, appearances and readings. The possibilities are endless.

 

If you decide to give this a try, my suggestion is to go the whole nine yards. Have officers, take minutes, follow a meeting agenda, etc. Make it a real organization that effectively serves the needs of the authors in your group. Remember, this isn't a group critiquing each other's work. You have writers groups for that. This is a group dedicated to the topic of marketing and branding for authors.

 

Imagine how much easier your journey as an indie author would be if you had a group of other indie authors helping you navigate the marketing world. Authors helping authors: that's how it should be!

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Covering the Convention Beat

It's Not Just a Hobby, It's a Marketing Opportunity

2,608 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, sales, writers
4

I self-published my first book in 2005. From the moment I had the trade paperback in my hand, I knew it wasn't going to sell itself. I scoured the Internet for information on how to sell books. The old world of publishing dominated the landscape at that time, so it was difficult parsing all the information to find strategies that fit an indie author. Slowly, I scratched and clawed my way through the gnarly marketing jungle and carved out a small, but growing niche for myself. I became known as an author who writes horror novels for young adults. It was a status that suited me just fine...at the time.

 

But I am an artist, and I like to experiment. I wanted to write something outside of the horror genre for an older audience. I tried doing just that under my name. It worked and it didn't. The book turned out as I envisioned, but most of the reader base I had built just wasn't that enamored with the work. Why should they have been? It was outside of their preferred genre, and it was written for a different demographic. I went back to my bread and butter and, as much as I enjoyed writing the other material, I decided I couldn't waste my creative time on it.

 

Then an idea came to me that I just couldn't shake. It wasn't young adult, and it wasn't horror by any stretch of the imagination. The characters, setting, and story were so clear in my mind that I couldn't help but write it. I decided early on that I would publish it, but not under my name. I would use a pen name.

 

I found it very liberating to write as someone else. If you're considering switching genres and trying something new, you might find it freeing as well. Using a pen name removes the expectations of the audience of readers you've established. Even if you choose to market to that same audience, they'll likely have a clearer understanding of the differences between your titles if you explain your choice of going with a nom de plume. You'll be able to experiment with style and language in a way you probably could not have under your established name.

 

So if you want to stretch your creative chops and untangle your imagination, I highly recommend publishing under another name. You may discover you've unwittingly been holding yourself back in certain areas. Once you exorcise those demons under a different name, you will satisfy the artist in you and become a better writer.    

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Should Authors Ever Reinvent Their Brands?

Brand Audience vs. Book Audience

7,658 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, selling, self-publishing, sales, writing, genre, brand, craft, marketing_strategy, brand_identity, demographic
2

Making it in publishing (indie or otherwise) is hard - hard in the same way it is to sail a boat without wind. It's a beautiful calm day on the water, and you're surrounded by breathtaking scenery. Schools of fish swim just below the glassy surface, birds soar overhead in a bright blue sky...yet all you can concentrate on is the fact that you're aimlessly drifting. 

 

So, when should you give up? When is enough enough? Tell me if this sounds familiar: You did your part. You wrote the best possible book you could write. You've blogged about it. You've taken to social media and done everything you can to get your friends and followers to help you spread the word. You've done personal videos. You may have even spent some money on advertising. But still the wind hasn't picked up. 

 

Don't give up on the wind; just stop waiting for it. You can still appreciate the scenery; that is to say, keep enjoying the writing. Here's the thing: as much as we hate to acknowledge it, drifting is moving. You put yourself in the water. You hoisted your sails. You are prepared for the wind. The longer you're on the water, the greater the chance you'll catch the wind and skirt over the waves. 

 

Writing keeps you on the water with your sails up. Keep at it. Appreciate it. Instead of focusing on what you haven't achieved, focus on how far you've come, what you've learned, the stories you have yet to write. A strong gust is bound to come along, and until then, there's too much else that deserves your attention.  

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

That Wise Old Doubt

How to Get Through the First Draft

1,992 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, author, promotion, sales, promotions, self-doubt, marketing_strategy
1

Can You Do More?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 7, 2013

If you're not selling as many books as you envisioned you would, the answer isn't to give up on your dream. The answer is to sit down and ask yourself a series of tough questions that may help you pinpoint where you went wrong, or if you went wrong. Here are the top questions you should ask yourself.

 

  • Is your cover holding you back? Even in this world of eBooks and online shopping, covers matter. A poorly made cover or a cover that doesn't adequately represent your genre can sink sales.
  • Is your book description just a summary? Book descriptions shouldn't be approached as a chance to summarize your story. Book descriptions should be looked at as a chance for you to sell your books. If you didn't write it with your marketing hat on, chances are it's not hitting the mark. Get your power words out, and get to work rewriting it. See my tips on book descriptions here.
  • Did you pick the right genre? Perhaps you're not totally clear on what kind of book you've written. Or you may even feel that your book is so versatile that it's not fair to limit it to just one or two genres. But do yourself a favor, and narrow your genre identification down to no more than two. It will be much easier to find and attract readers if you clearly define the book you've written.
  • Are you actively marketing? If you're sitting back and waiting for sales, there's a better-than-good chance those sales won't come. Get on the social media wheel and start running. Blog your heart out, and turn on that video camera. You've got some marketing to do. Check out Marketing Central for some ideas.

 

A little self-examination never hurt anyone. If book sales are less than stellar, you owe it to yourself to do all you can to sell more books. If you don't want to do it for yourself, do it for all those readers who are missing out!

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in?

 

What is Your Pivot Point?

Make Your Brand Engaging

8,854 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, sales
1

Selling books is hard. I understand that because I fight the fight every day. I sometimes look at my sales figures and wonder why the universe is so angry with me. What have I done to deserve such a thing? I fret and search the internet for stories of authors who've made it in a big way, and I look for the magic bullet that garnered them all those wonderful sales, only to discover there usually was no magic bullet. Persistence and opportunity happened to converge in their lives and BAM! Books went flying off the virtual shelves.

 

Success should be earned. It should be something you struggle to achieve. That struggle is really just a series of trials that can lead you down one of two paths. You can either wind up feeling bitter for what hasn't happened, or you can feel appreciative for what you've learned along the way. If you choose the bitter path, you will undoubtedly ditch the persistence and miss the opportunity to succeed. If you chose the learning path, you'll crave to know more, and you'll be fully prepared to take advantage of opportunities when they present themselves to you.

 

I write all this because I've come across a few pronouncements by authors online that reeked of desperation. They've publicly lamented that they can't get anyone to buy their books, and the effort is just too great. Writing a book hadn't changed their lives like they thought it would. They make a plea for readers to do more. If readers don't, then the author will give up on his or her dream. Their plea usually falls on deaf ears. 

 

Guilt is the least effective marketing tool that I know of. It will have the opposite effect on readers. Desperation is an inevitable feeling when you think your dream is just too far out of reach, but don't let it taint this publishing journey for you. Learn from the struggle, appreciate it, and embrace the opportunities when they finally arrive.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Book Marketing Takes Persistence

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

2,165 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, promotion, sales, effective_marketing
2

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How a Great Twitter Bio Can Net You More Followers…and Sales! -BadRedhead Media

Your Twitter bio is important, so make it count.           

                                                    

Storyville: What is Literary Fiction? -Lit Reactor

The answer to that age-old question many authors have asked: "Did I just accidently write literary fiction?"

 

Film

                                                        

Social Media for #Filmmakers: Facebook 101 - Film Independent

To thrive in filmmaking today, you have to add one more job title to your list of many as an independent filmmaker: social media evangelist.

                                          

10 Pinterest Boards Filmmakers Should Be Following - Indiewire

Pinterest has become a social media favorite for a lot of filmmakers.

                                    

Music

 

11 Ways to Sabotage Studio Vocals - Judy Rodman

Judy lists some the habits and choices that influence your vocals.

 

The Accident That Changed Modern Guitar Sound - The Big Picture Music Production Blog

Who knew a little accidental guitar distortion would have such a huge impact on music?

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup - August 9, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - August 2, 2013

2,357 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, indie, sales, writers, writing, films, promotions, filmmakers, social_media, author_brand, music_production, vocals
1 2 3 ... 5 Previous Next

Actions