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602 Posts tagged with the self_publishing tag
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We've talked about the rule of consistency in branding. That is to say, you have a look, style, and message that is associated with your brand, and if you make drastic changes to any element of your brand along the way, you run the risk of losing your brand identity.


Today, I want to discuss a similar concept in branding. It's called the rule of repetition. It differs from the rule of consistency in that it is strictly centered on your messaging. There is a fast-food chain where you can have it your way. There is a soft drink on the market that is accompanied with a smile. There is an insurance company that claims you're in good hands. I didn't name one product in those three examples, but I'm guessing most of you know the product. Here, I'll include the slogans, minus the product name, and I'm more than confident you can provide the answers.


Have it your way at ____.


Have a ____ and a smile.


You're in good hands with ____.


Some of these slogans aren't even used anymore, but they are engrained in my memory banks. Why? Because I heard them over and over and over...and over again. The companies practically used the slogans on a constant loop. You, as a brand, should do the same thing. You won't necessarily come up with a slogan, but if you are a genre writer, include the genre in your brand. For example, you're not Jo B. Writer. You're Horror Author Jo B. Writer. If you'd rather focus on your accomplishments, then be Award-Winning Author Jo B. Writer or Best-selling Author Jo B. Writer. Always use it. Repeat the message whenever you can. Make it part of your email signature. Include it wherever you can. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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A Long Term Branding Strategy

How to Be Interesting Enough to Be a Brand

466 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, writing, social_media, author_brand, writing_advice
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In a previous post, I discussed how useful beats are to show your readers instead of telling them. I also advised against using beats too often because it can dilute their effect. Another way to devalue the impact of beats is by telling readers what those beats are already showing.


For example, the following beats do a solid job of letting us know what the character is thinking:


  • He slammed his cup down so hard that it broke. (His actionshows us that he's angry.)
  • She rolled her eyes. (Her actionshows us that she's irritated/exasperated.)
  • She batted her eyelashes at him. (Her actionshows us that she's being flirtatious.)
  • He cocked his head to the side. (His action shows us that he's confused.)


When writers tell us what the beats are already showing us, it can become a problem if done too frequently. I recently read a novel in which the author included an explanation after almost every beat, and as a result I found myself repeatedly thinking, "Why is she telling me this? Doesn't she see how obvious it is that (insert name of character) is (insert adjective)?"


Here are some examples of what I mean:


  • He slammed his cup down so hard that it broke, furious.
  • She rolled her eyes, exasperated.
  • She batted her eyelashes at him, clearly flirting.
  • He cocked his head to the side, confused.


Am I the only one who finds these explanations unnecessary? I doubt it. Readers are smart, so respect that intelligence. We might all have a tendency to tell too much in the first draft, but that's what revisions are for! It's never fun to cut your own words, but your writing will be better for it, and your readers will appreciate it. I promise.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Turn the Beat Around

 

Use Beats to Show, Not Tell

 

716 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, writing, promotions, action_beats, writing_tip, dialgue_tags
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Compelling

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Apr 17, 2017

When I'm asked to describe a book I love, I will invariably use the word compelling to describe it. Whether it's the plot or the character development or some other element of the story, I have found something compelling about the book. The question is what does that really mean?


Yes, there is a clear definition of the word compelling. In short, it means I found the story irresistible. I can't tell you how to make a book irresistible in a quantifiable way. There's no formula that I can give and say, "Use this and your book will be compelling." I mean I could, but that would make me a con man who you should stay far away from.


But what I can do is tell you what I think makes a book compelling. I find a story compelling when it strikes one of two chords:


  1. It's familiar. I can relate to some aspect of the story. Either I recognize myself in the protagonist or I know the setting. I'm compelled to read more because I can picture myself living the story.
  2. It's plausible. Even in a fantasy-based story, if plausibility is the base on which the story is built, I find the story compelling. Sure a vampire might be terrorizing a town, but if some junk science is introduced that casts a shadow of plausibility on how vampires can exist, I will find the story more compelling. I don't even need full plausibility. I just need a sliver of, "Hmm, I suppose it's not totally out of the question." Of course, the more ironclad the plausibility, the greater my attraction to the story.


So, that's what makes a book compelling to me. What makes a story compelling to you?


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Horoscope Prompt

The Resolution Matrix

526 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, character_development, story_elements
1

A few years ago I attended a seminar on starting a small business, and each of the six or seven speakers I heard that day emphasized how important it is to build the list! At the time I remember thinking that was the one thing they all had in common. Now I am also thinking something else: they were right.


Building a mailing list takes time and effort, but it can be a valuable marketing tool, perhaps your most valuable marketing tool. Whether it's through regular email or a newsletter program such as Mailchimp or Constant Contact (I use Mailchimp), a mailing list allows you to keep in touch with the people who want to hear from you.


I always recommend a newsletter program over email, so people can opt in. Yes, they can also unsubscribe, and yes, it will sting when they do. But that shaking out is part of the process of getting a true list, which is what you want. With email, if someone doesn't want to hear from you, it's unlikely that she is going to reply and ask you to take her off your list. (Full disclosure: that happened to me once years ago when I was first starting out, and I will never forget it. Ouch!) A newsletter program also allows you to see how many people are opening your messages, which isn't possible with email.


The best way to build your list is to add a "join the mailing list" button to your website. (Yet another reason to have a website!) Another way is to ask people you meet--and who show a genuine interest in your writing--for their business cards or email addresses. And if anyone emails you about your book, that's also an opportunity.


Note: I strongly recommend asking before adding anyone to your list. The last thing you want to do is annoy potential readers, right? In my opinion, a little courtesy goes a long way.


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Mailing List Dos and Don'ts

Two easy (and free!) ways to spread the word about your book

590 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, marketing_tools, marketing_tip
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How to develop a plot

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Apr 10, 2017

There are lots of rules for developing a plot on the Internet these days. Most lists are the same old same old. Today, I'd like to give you a list of elements for developing plot that you may not have heard before. Use them as you see fit.


  1. Unknown: Your protagonist is driven by the unknown. Some unanswered question is gnawing at him or her, and the desire to find the answer is the force behind your plot. The question can be a "who," a "what," or a "why" question. An example is, "How does he get the woman across the hall to fall in love with him?"
  2. Stakes: Your protagonist has to have something at stake in order to push the plot forward. In the example above, he's trying to win the love of the woman across the hall. The stakes could be as simple as if he loses her, he will be letting the one perfect woman go, or it could be as complicated as his identity as a time traveler who's come back through time to make sure that his past self and the woman get together in order to save all of humanity.
  3. A touch of hopelessness: As you progress through the story, the reader must buy into a sense of hopelessness that the protagonist might not succeed. They have to buy that there are real consequences for failing. If your protagonist is constantly winning, then you're making the journey not quite as gripping as it could be. The conclusion of the story should feel like a sigh of relief or sadness. It shouldn't feel like an expected outcome.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Turning Subplots into Plots

The Time-Sensitive Plot Device

598 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_development, plot_development
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The other day I was catching up with my friend and fellow author Andrea Dunlop, who is also a social media consultant. She mentioned that she'd had success promoting her debut novel, Losing the Light, on Instagram. Never having used the platform myself, I asked her if she could give me (and my loyal blog readers) some pointers, and she kindly agreed! Here's what she had to say:


A lot of authors are initially a bit baffled as to how to use such a visual medium for book promotion. To get you off on the right foot, here are four of the most common questions I get about Instagram from clients, answered:


  1. Who should use it? Any author can make great use of Instagram because, like Facebook and Twitter before it, the platform now has a critical mass of users, meaning that even niche books can find an audience with a bit of research and some canny use of hashtags. However, Instagram is especially good for any book that has visual elements (think cookbooks or design books) and books of any genre whose audience skews young and female. This is especially true for YA books but applies to plenty of literary and commercial adult fictions as well (and most fiction readers are female, FYI).
  2. What do I put on there? If you're using the platform primarily as an author, aim for at least 75% book-related posts. Note, I do not mean 75% posts about your book and your book only (please don't do that on any social media platform). Share reading recommendations, behind-the-scenes shots of your workspace, pictures of works-in-progress (marked up manuscripts, covers, page proofs, galleys) photos from book events, etc. Instagram gives you a lot of space to write captions, so take advantage and share some more in-depth thoughts on what you're reading or writing. You could really do all book posts if you wanted, but I think it's nice to use the platform to show off some of your personality as well with pictures pertaining to your hobbies, your pets, travel, where you live, etc. And don't forget hashtags! Some of the most popular for readers are #bookstagram, #instabook, #igreads, #bookish, and #booknerd.
  3. How frequently do I need to post? I recommend posting daily--three times per week at a minimum. Don't worry if it takes you a while to get the hang of taking photos, using filters, using hashtags, etc.
  4. What if I don't get very many followers? Not to worry. As with all social media, there's more to it than follower count. If you can build up several thousand followers or more, that's awesome, but you've got books to write, and this is but one platform in your overall marketing strategy. The best thing you can do is establish a relationship with readers and fellow bookstagrammers so that when you do have a book to share with them, you're already a part of a community who is excited to hear from you.


So, go, dive in! Feel the #bookish love. You can follow me (@andreadunlop), of course, and here are a few other authors who I think are killing it on the platform:

  • R. S. Grey (@authorrsgrey)
  • Tara Austen Weaver (@tea_austen)
  • Rachel Del (@racheldelxo)
  • Kevin Kwan (@kevinkwanbooks)
  • Liza and Lisa (@lisaandliz)


Many thanks to Andrea for sharing her expertise! To learn more about her consulting services, visit www.andreadunlop.net.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing tip: share what you've learned

Marketing tip: follow the 80/20 rule in social media

1,416 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, promotions, instagram
1

 

Your book has been on the market for a few years. Sales were brisk in the beginning, but they are virtually nonexistent now. Here's how to let the title go and stop promoting it. You may want to write this list down and post it somewhere in your writing space.


  1. Don't--DO NOT STOP PROMOTING.


Nope, it's not a long list, but it is important. There is no reason for you not to promote a book you wrote a year ago, five years ago, or even ten years ago. As long as you don't have inventory or a nonfiction book that contains a time-sensitive subject matter, why would you stop promoting your book?


Your book has a publishing anniversary. That's a perfect time to promote it every year. If your book has a seasonal theme, that season occurs every year. Why shouldn't you promote it? If your book is a work with a historical event or figure at its core, then that historical event has an anniversary. The historical figure has a birth date. Those are other opportunities to promote your book, no matter how old the book is.


Conventional wisdom used to be that you frontload the release of a book with all your publicity efforts, and then you move on. Print-on-demand and digital publishing has made that sort of publicity strategy obsolete. Your book will never go out of print. Why, then, would you stop promoting it? To not promote it is wasting opportunity.


Don't move on in the sense that you will forget about your book. Move on and write your next book. Promote your next book. Just don't forget your previous books when it comes to promotion.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Marketing Maze

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

 

 

 

 

1,081 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, promotion, promotions, marketing_advice, promotion_advice
1

I've written multiple blog posts about beats, which use action to show readers how a character is feeling instead of telling them. For example:


Krista slammed the refrigerator door shut. "I told you to leave me alone!"


Compare the above to this:


"I told you to leave me alone!" Krista shouted, furious.


Having Krista slam the refrigerator door not only shows us that she's furious instead of telling us, it also gives us a visual of what is happening. Both of those things are good. However, it's important not to use too many beats, because they can become distracting--and annoying.


When I received the first draft of my most recent novel back from my developmental editor, she noted that I'd used a large number of beats and suggested that I delete many of them, which I quickly did. I didn't think too much about it at the time, but then last week I read a novel that used beats so often that I quickly found myself getting distracted by them, then annoyed by them, and eventually I wanted to throw my Kindle out the window. Here's just one example of a conversation in the book, with identifying details altered:


"You seem distracted." Leslie tossed a pen at Jesse across the desk.


"Sorry." Jesse leaned back in his chair and crossed his hands behind his head. "You know I'm terrible at this part of my job."


"You mean the paperwork?" Leslie leaned forward.


Jesse leaned forward too, elbows on his knees, head hung low. "Yes."


Do you see how distracting beats can be when used too often? To me, the above reads like stage directions, not a conversation, and the beats cumulatively ruined the reading experience for me. I realize now what great advice my editor gave me. Like fine wine and high-calorie desserts, beats are best in moderation!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Use Beats to Show, Not Tell

Dialogue Tip: Make It Clear Who is Talking

688 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, action_beats, writing_tip, dialogue_tags
0

 

I've read many times how important it is for authors to start their marketing campaigns well before their books come out, but rarely do those articles or blog posts give examples of what to do. Here's a specific tactic that's worked twice for me: Ask people to help you choose a cover.


My latest novel comes out in a couple months, so I asked for help in choosing the cover design. After I narrowed it down to two options I loved equally, here's what I did:


  1. I posted both covers on my personal Facebook page, along with a one-line description of the book, and asked all my real-life friends to weigh in
  2. I posted both options on my Facebook author fan page and asked all my fans to vote
  3. I had Waverly Bryson, the protagonist of my first four novels, post both options on her Facebook page
  4. I tweeted both options from @mariamurnane
  5. I sent both options to everyone on my mailing list (sign up on any page of www.mariamurnane.com)
  6. I blogged about the cover vote on my website and asked people to email me their choice


I set a clear deadline, then tallied all the votes and announced the winner to all of the above audiences. Many of those who participated have told me that they can't wait for the book to come out because they feel invested in the process--yay!


For your cover vote campaign, if it's your first book, the initial audience you reach might be small, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't try it. Ask your Facebook friends to share the request with their friends, retweet it on Twitter, etc. Then build those channels as you go. You have to start somewhere, right?


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Book covers can affect sales

Book marketing tip: make it easy for your fans to help you

4,713 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, contests, promotions, marketing_campaigns
1

Re-readable books

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Mar 20, 2017

 

My wife recently read a book from start to finish in a single evening. The next night, she cracked open the same book and read it again. No, it wasn't one of my books, but that's OK. We have an understanding. She's allowed to enjoy books I didn't write.


In talking with her about it, I quickly realized what made the book so enchanting to her. It was the characters the author had created. My wife shared with me aspects of their lives, dialogue, relationships, backstory. She talked about them as if they were people she'd known her whole life. What we didn't talk about was the plot of the book. It almost seemed irrelevant to her.


Well-developed characters can not only make a book readable, they can make it re-readable. Think about it. The allure of a mystery that relies on clever plot twists and the unknown to hook readers doesn't quite have that same allure once the twists are revealed and the unknown is known. You may have enjoyed the book immensely, but chances are you aren't going to read it again.


The exception to this would be the same book, but with extraordinary character development. Then the book has an appeal that extends beyond the mystery it reveals. You may re-read the book just to reconnect with the characters you miss. You know the mystery within, but that no longer matters because you're a fan of the characters.


If you want to write a book that is re-readable, the part of your craft you need to develop is character development. It is the one aspect of storytelling that keeps readers coming back over and over again.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Start a dialogue with your characters

Advice on character development

826 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_development, characterization
0

 

You've got a protagonist. You've got a villain. You may even have a co-protagonist or two. And the bad guy has a past filled with characters that made him...well, bad. Then there are the background characters that need fleshing out in order for the reader to truly appreciate what they add to the story. And the protagonist has a dog. Your readers are probably going to want to know what the dog's thinking. And your classic villains always have cats. The cat deserves to be understood. What's it like to be a villain's cat?


Add all this up and you've got a messy character stew that is hard to digest. There's just too much going on. Who's who and why do readers need to care? If you divert their attention by giving them too many characters to keep up with, you run the risk of losing them. Lose a reader, and it will be harder for you to find the next reader.


That's not to say there aren't exceptions to my rule. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner is a notable example. It not only has multiple characters, but as many as 15 of them are, at some point in the story, handed the reins of narrator. It is a classic literary work of art. What Faulkner was able to pull off is remarkable. It's also a very difficult read that was written in a different era.


My advice is to keep it simple when it comes to character development. Keep the focus on just a few characters and concentrate on drawing your reader deeper into their stories.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Character Development Lessons from Breaking Bad

 

The Stranger in the Room

 

746 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_development, characterization
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Blog content ideas

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Mar 8, 2017

Finding the right material for your blog can be time-consuming, particularly if you're trying to find material that never grows old. Here are five ideas for content to include on your blog.


  1. Top writing tips: You're a writer. You have tips. Give them. Chances are, you won't make dramatic changes to your writing philosophy over the years. If you do, just amend your tips to match your new methods.
  2. Historical piece: Write a blog post that deals with the history of your genre, your hobby, passion project, etc. A historical blog post is excellent for drawing visitors over a sustained period of time. The information contained within is used as a point of reference for the curious, and inquiring minds tend to crop up every day.
  3. Plant evergreens: Link to or embed evergreen (always relevant) material in your blog. Pick a topic that is applicable to your author brand, and make it a staple on your blog. You can always find "how-to" or "tutorial" videos to embed in a blog post. These videos are particularly useful for drawing in a steady stream of new visitors.
  4. Seasonal topics: Write about seasonal topics on your blog. You won't get a steady stream of visitors throughout the year, but you will see an increase in visitors as the season approaches every year.
  5. Write time-independent material: Do you have a killer recipe for brownies that you can post? How about a family remedy for a persistent cough? Whatever timeless material you can think of would make great material for your blog.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Resources to Help You Blog Daily

Never Too Boring to Blog

1,133 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, blogging, publishing, writing, blog_idea
0

In a previous post I recommended developing a mailing list for a semiregular newsletter to keep in touch with fans between books. You might not have a book launch on the near horizon, but that doesn't mean you don't have other news to share.


Another good way to stay connected to your fans between books is through Facebook. Here's how I use it:


For my author fan page, I share the same things that I do in my newsletter, e.g., event photos, news about upcoming translations of my books, promotions for signed copies, photos of fans holding up my books (which encourages other fans to send me similar pictures), awards my books have won, etc.


If right now you're thinking, "But I don't have any awards or event photos, etc.," why not post a photo of yourself working hard at your desk? Or do you write at Starbucks? How about a photo of that? Be creative! This is an art, not a science. You can do it!


In addition to my author fan page, I created a Facebook profile for Waverly Bryson, the protagonist of four of my novels. Every day I log in and see which of her friends are celebrating a birthday, and I'll have her write each one a personalized birthday greeting. (If I've released a book within the past year I'll also include a link to the first chapter as a "gift.") Now and again I have Waverly comment on other people's posts, and sometimes I even have her post funny photos or videos of her own. Sometimes Waverly's friends post photos or notes about the Waverly Bryson books on her page, which I then "share" with all of her friends. It's fun for my fans and fun for me: a win-win!


How do you use Facebook to promote your writing? I would love to know, so please share in the comments section below.


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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How to Connect with Your Readers

Tips for Engaging Your Readers Online

 

935 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, writing, mailing_list, promotions, fan_page
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One of my favorite parts about finishing a first draft, outside of the profound feeling of accomplishment, is that after months of hard work I'm finally able to sit back and read the entire story from beginning to end. It's impossible for me to experience my work with completely fresh eyes--that's why I strongly believe that every manuscript needs a developmental edit--but it is possible for me to evaluate the dialogue and see if it rings true for the characters I've created.


I find that my characters' personalities tend to evolve as I write, so by the time I'm done with the first draft, they may be quite different from how I had imagined them at the onset. As a result, when I go back and read from the beginning, I often tweak the dialogue to make it sound more authentic. I love this part of the process, because when I find myself thinking, "She would never say that," or nodding in agreement with what's already on the page, I know I've created characters that are believable, with realistic dialogue to match.


Reading dialogue from the beginning also helps me identify when a prominent character isn't developed enough. If, for the life of me, I can't tell if a line sounds like something so-and-so would say, then maybe so-and-so needs a little more attention.


One of the common criticisms of first-time novelists is that their characters all sound the same when they talk, which makes it hard for readers to follow along. I've experienced this as a reader, and when it happens too often, I usually end up putting the book down--for good. If you can give your characters distinct voices that are consistent throughout the story, you have a much better chance of getting your readers engaged--and keeping them that way!


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Quirks Make Characters Real

What would your characters do?

862 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, dialogue, character_development
3

Yes, bad reviews can be soul-crushing. They can make you question your abilities as a writer. They can leave you feeling hurt and depressed. You shouldn't let them have that much power over you because it literally is only an opinion. It isn't a formula devised by the reviewer that proves your book is bad. There is no concrete evidence in a review that proves you can't write. It's a collection of words that paints a subjective view of your book.


I've attended many public readings of works in progress, and you wouldn't believe the stark differences of opinion from those in attendance. Some were blown away by the reading, and others didn't get it. The same material was judged completely differently by two, three, sometimes by a half dozen people. Reviewers would get in heated arguments about their diverging opinions. Here's the thing, neither side, for or against, could provide absolute proof that their opinion wasn't just opinion but bona fide fact. It just wasn't possible to prove.


When you read a bad review of your book, keep this in mind: it's not a statement of fact. Accept it for what it is, a skewed view based on the reviewer's taste. I can&'t stand the movie The English Patient. A lot of people loved it. In fact, it won a truckload of awards. My opinion of the movie is based on my own personal taste. It doesn't mean I'm right. It just means it's not for me.


Don?t let bad reviews ruin your day. They're nothing more than opinions.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Bad Reviews & Great Company

Get Reviews for Your Indie Book

614 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, reviews, review, writing, book_reviews, branding
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