Skip navigation
1 2 3 ... 38 Previous Next

Resources

570 Posts tagged with the self_publishing tag
0

You have a story to tell. It's your own. You've either lived an interesting life that is full of intrigue or tragedy or inspiration, or you've experienced an event that either made you or broke you. Whatever the circumstance, your story must be told. The problem you are faced with is whether to write an autobiography or a memoir.


Yes, there is a difference between the two. Here's an explanation of both to help you decide which category best fits your story.


Autobiography: You've had an interesting life. From the day you were born, to the day you sit behind your laptop to write your story, your life has been filled with twists and turns that could, well, fill a book. Your story is told in chronological order, and there is strong possibility that you have achieved at least some notoriety.


Memoir: A major event or series of events has caused a turning point in your life. You have no notoriety, but the struggle and/or triumph you've experienced has given you a perspective that you feel compelled to share. In many ways, regardless of when this event happened in your life, it's a coming-of-age tale or an emotional awakening. And the telling of your story doesn't necessarily happen in chronological order.


While most retailers lump autobiographies and memoirs together, it is important to know the difference as an author. If the whole of your life doesn't offer something out of the ordinary, don't tell it. Focus instead on the changing event that made you who you are.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Presenting Fiction as Fact Can Be a Slippery Slope

Claim Your Genre

181 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, autobiography, memoir
3

I love historical fiction. To me, it's just a fun genre to read. I've never dabbled in it as an author, but here are the five consistent elements I've noticed as a fan of historical fiction over the years:


  1. Know the facts. I don't just mean casually. Know the tiniest detail. If you're not sure on a particular detail, dive deeper until you find the answer. Historical fiction is a category that sends readers to their nearest computers to look up information on their own using their favorite search engines. They are going to essentially check your work. Be diligent.
  2. Know the fiction. Every major event in history worth writing about comes with a heavy dose of conspiracy theories. It's just part of the human condition to create suppositions that help us deal with outcomes we have trouble accepting. We complicate things because the truth just doesn't make sense. As a historical novelist, you need to know the conspiracy theories that came about as a result of your historical event. Play with incorporating elements of the conspiracy into your story. Keep your readers guessing. Have some fun.
  3. You have no favorites. The acts of a historical figure may have drawn you to the story, but don't let your admiration prevent you from creating a three-dimensional character that is as flawed as he or she is heroic. Don't sit in judgment of any of your characters.
  4. Don't explain things. It is so easy to use heavy doses of exposition when writing a historical novel. You, as the author, get caught in the trap of trying to bring the reader up to speed on the where, why, when, and how of every incident, but it's not necessary.
  5. Know the shape of your story. Decide early on if you want to write a novel that features characters shaped by a historical event or a historical event shaped by your characters. The answer will come from your research, but whatever you decide, keep this structure in mind because it will set the tone of your book.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Rethinking history

Too much exposition

562 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, historical_fiction
0

 

National Novel Writing Month is here again. Are you participating? If so, the best piece of advice I can give you is to set a daily word target and stick with it.


I've never written a full novel in just one month, but I did once write one in six weeks. I got it done by setting a daily word quota and not letting myself stop until I reached it, no matter what. If you let the word count slide one day, that can quickly turn into two days, or a week, and then before you know it you have just a few days to finish the entire thing. If you're the kind of person who can power through at your desk for twenty hours and still function, then by all means, do what works for you. But my brain doesn't work that way. For me, chipping away day by day is the only way to go. It keeps me engaged, fresh, and enjoying the process.


The folks at NaNoWriMo suggest 50,000 as a target word count for a full-length novel. Divided by 30, that's a daily word count of 1,667. If you have a demanding day job and prefer to do the bulk of the work on the weekends, there are several ways to slice and dice the math to create a schedule that best suits you. The key is to:


1)    Create a word count schedule you can follow

2)    Follow the word count schedule!


That's really all it comes down to. Writing a novel is a lot of work and will be mentally challenging, but if you really want to do it, you can! There's no magic formula other than sitting down at your computer and letting your imagination (and fingers) take it from there. Now get writing!


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

How to Write a Novel in a Month

Productivity vs. Perfection

680 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, writing, nanowrimo, writing_month
0

The rewriting steps

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 21, 2016

Most authors hate rewrites. I know because I used to be one of those authors. Over the years, I've learned to break down the rewrite process into manageable steps, and it has made the ordeal less of an ordeal. I actually love rewrites now. It's an opportunity to dive deeper and really explore character and plot. Here are the steps I've learned to incorporate into my rewriting process:

 

  1. Give it some time. Don't attempt to rewrite a first draft that took you weeks or months to write immediately after you type "The End." Give yourself some space. I recommend four to six weeks. Fill in the downtime by starting a new project. You need to gain a fresh perspective, and you only do that by weeks of distractions.
  2. Do a reader's read-through. Don't take notes or make corrections. Just power through reading the first draft as is. Soak in the story and characters without your editor's hat on.
  3. React and record. After the first read-through, sit down and write your gut reaction to the material. What worked? What didn't? What do you need to cut? What do you need to expand on? Be detailed. You should have pages of notes at the end of this process.
  4. Now read the material as an editor. Correct, cut, reshape at will. Be brutal. You are not the writer. You are the editor. Don't hold back.
  5. Write a post-rewrite outline. You want to see a sketch of the story to make sure it's coherent and compelling in the broadest possible terms. You should get a good overview of the story using this strategy and find any holes before the next step.
  6. Get feedback. The next and last step is to hand your rewrite off to pre-publication readers to get feedback before you publish. Be on the lookout for consistent criticisms. Particularly pay attention to feedback on elements of the story that you weren't sure about. Overall, trust your gut.


Rewriting is easy when you break it down in steps. Looking at it as one laborious task can be daunting. Take a breath. Give yourself some space and take it one step at a time.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Reward Yourself

Rewrites: Make the Hardest Changes First

623 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, editing, writing, rewrites
0

We are approaching 2017, and we still don't have flying cars and food replicators. Nope. The utopic Jetsonian future has yet to become a reality. And yet there have been advancements in the last 10 years that have been truly inspiring--a lot of them in the publishing industry. We can now read books on our smartphones. We can carry devices that weigh less than an average sized children's book that hold thousands of titles. We truly are living in a golden age of indie publishing.


The one thing that hasn't changed is that the best way to sell books is through word of mouth. Recommendations from friends and other trusted individuals is the number one way readers discover new books to read, and it's not likely to be supplanted by another method any time soon.


Your job is clear. Engage your readers. Find the influencers in your group and let them know about new reviews, upcoming events, awards, etc. The more information you feed them, the more they have to pass along to their spheres of influence. You're not bragging or begging for attention. You're keeping highly persuasive members of your volunteer sales force informed.

 

Your goal is to find as many of these influencers as you can. The best way to do that is to be an active member within your genre's community. Find groups online and even locally that discuss other books in your genre and/or films, and be a valued member of that community. Once you get to know all the personalities, you'll know who to enlist in your volunteer sales force to be crucial cogs in the word-of-mouth campaign.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

You may also be interested in...

 

What Ignites Word of Mouth?

 

A Marketing Tool You Control

 

676 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, self-publishing, writers, genre, social_media, engage, influence
2

 

If you're an author, aspiring or published, chances are you've heard of "show vs. tell," but that doesn't necessarily mean you have a solid grasp on what it means. At times I struggle with the concept myself, as evidenced by the "Stop telling!" comments my editor makes on the early drafts of my novels.


I recently read a book that helped me understand why it's so important to show and not tell. Throughout the novel the author explicitly told me how the characters were feeling or what they were doing. As a result I found myself thinking, "Why is the author telling me this? Does he think I'm too dumb to realize that on my own?" Following are some specific examples, with some details changed to protect the author's identity:


  • "What are you doing here?" Sheila exclaimed in surprise.
  • "Hey, that's not fair," Carl said in his own defense.
  • "You'll understand once you meet him," Nora explained.
  • "I had no idea," Roger said in astonishment.
  • Randy's jaw dropped in disbelief. "No way," he said.


See how unnecessary the italicized parts are? Good writing makes it clear that characters are astonished, or explaining something, or in disbelief, without having to tell the readers as much.


See how much stronger those same sentences are when we take away the telling and, in some cases, add in some showing?


  • Sheila gasped. "What are you doing here?"
  • "Hey, that's not fair," Carl said.
  • "You'll understand once you meet him," Nora said.
  • Roger's eyes got big. "I had no idea."
  • Randy's jaw dropped. "No way," he whispered.


The above examples let us readers use our brains to figure out what is going on, and that's a much more enjoyable experience than being told what is going on. Keep that in mind when you"re working on your next project!


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Use Beats to Show, Not Tell

Show vs. Tell: Do You Know the Difference?

655 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, showing, telling, show_vs_tell
0

It's a common refrain. "Constructive criticism only please." I've sat through many public readings, and I've often wondered if the various criticisms doled out during the course of the night met the "constructive criticism" criteria. It is, in a way, a generic term.


Wikipedia defines it thusly:


"Constructive criticism is the process of offering valid and well-reasoned opinions about the work of others, usually involving both positive and negative comments, in a friendly manner rather than an oppositional one. The purpose of 'constructive criticism' is to improve the outcome."


What I have found is that by and large, the least constructive of the criticisms are the glowing critiques that do not contain any specifics. It may make the writer feel good, but it does little in the way of telling him or her what it was that made the work so great.


In my opinion, the most constructive critique of work uses the following formula:


  1. Point out what it is you thought worked in the piece and explain why. Be detailed as opposed to effusive. The writer isn't there for an ego boost; he or she is there to learn if the story is headed in the right direction.
  2. Now point out what didn't work. You can always find something. Be kind, but be honest. Again, details are important. If the writer feels like you've put a lot of thought into your negative comments, he or she will appreciate your honesty and apparent interest in their work.


The important part of participating in a reading is to be balanced. Give the writer a pat on the back, but don't give false praise if you think the work can be improved. Instead, give hope that, with a few adjustments, the story will be great.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Get to the kissing

The Importance of Soliciting Feedback

497 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, feedback, constructive_criticism
0

In a previous post I encouraged authors to let me know what marketing efforts had worked for them. Joni M. Fisher got in touch to tell me she had recently completed a successful Goodreads giveaway but wished she had done a couple things differently. I thought my readers would be interested to learn from her experience, so I asked if we could do a Q&A, and she graciously agreed. Her book is called South of Justice, which she describes as "suspense with elements of romance."


Maria: How many Amazon reviews did you have before the promotion?

Joni: None, because I ran my promotion leading up to my book's release date on May 15, 2016.


Maria: How long did it last?

Joni: April 24 to May 15. I wish I had run it a full month, but I was still finding my way around Goodreads, and Amazon, and all the other places to list a book.


Maria: How many books did you offer?

Joni: 25 trade paperback copies. I noticed that many other authors offer only five or 10 books. As a first-time author, I wanted people to discover my book. My reasoning for giving away more books was that readers would consider their odds better, so they'd click to join the giveaway. They risk nothing to try the unknown author's work.


Maria: How many people signed up?

Joni: 845. Many of them automatically added my book to their To-Read list, which tells all their friends that they are interested in the book.


Maria: How many wrote reviews?

Joni: 19 as far that I can tell. According to the Giveaways Best Practices on Goodreads, winners are not required to write a review, but the site does encourage them to.


Maria: What would you do differently next time?

Joni: In the future, instead of doing a giveaway with 25 or 50 books, I would run multiple giveaways with fewer copies of the book. This keeps the title on the giveaways feed longer.


Maria: Final thoughts?

Joni: I'm glad I did the Goodreads Giveaway for South of Justice. I gained exposure for the book, gained wonderful reviews, and received my first ever fan mail. One of the winners sent me a card thanking me for the book and also gave a lovely review. I'm saving the card. During the long days of writing and editing, that card reminds me that someone appreciates my efforts.


Many thanks to Joni for sharing the details of her campaign. If you have a marketing success story for me, please get in touch!


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...


Promote your book with Goodreads

Marketing tip: always carry a book with you

 

 

 

 

734 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, goodreads, promotions, giveaway
0

You shouldn't just be in a writers' group. You should run one, or co-run one, at the very least. Here are five tips to running a writers' group:


  1. Introduction: At the opening, introduce yourself and invite attendees to do the same one at a time. Acknowledge the space and the party responsible for letting you use it. Go over any "house rules," and then get into the rules pertaining to the readings.
  2. Focus on the Reader: If at all possible, don't let the author read his or her own material. They need to hear the pages. The reader should be the focal point of the room. If you have a stage, all the better. Place them on it and give them the go ahead to start when they're ready.
  3. Focus on the Author: Once the reader is done, the author now becomes the focal point in the room. Again, if you have a stage, he or she will now take it. Ask the author what kind of feedback they would like to hear. Encourage the author not to respond unless specifically asked to respond. Your goal is to make sure the author doesn't start defending his or her material.
  4. Criticism: Keep the criticism on track. If someone veers off into territory that you don't feel is appropriate, politely cut them off and move onto the next question or dismiss the author.
  5. Closing: When the night is done, thank everyone for their participation, and make sure you have everyone's email address so you can send out reminders for the next scheduled reading.


A writers' group can be much more than a number of artists sharing their passion. It can be a group of friends supporting one another's craft.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Form an author co-op

Why novelists should join a playwrights' group

760 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, writing, writing_groups
0

Every author has a different way of getting to the finish line, but is there a best way? Expert Anne Janzer, who wrote a book called The Writer's Process, says the path to publication includes researching, thinking deeply, outlining/structuring, drafting, revising, and editing. I asked her for her top three process-related tips for aspiring authors, and here's what she came back with:


1.    Divide and conquer

Some phases of the process require focused attention, while others call on the associative, subconscious parts of your mind. Understand what you need and when you need it. You might love drafting while sitting in a coffee shop but need total isolation for revision. Knowing the phases of the process, you can match the work to your mood and environment.


2.    Schedule breaks to incubate the work

Focused attention can block creative inspiration. Add activities that do not require focus to your writing day. Many writers go outdoors, play piano, or do something physical as part of their schedules. This gives other parts of the brain a chance to contribute. You may be more productive when you next sit down to write.


3.    Trust the process

Process is invaluable when you're working on a book. During the long haul, you may doubt your ability to finish the project. But you only need to summon the courage to take the next step in the process. The path forward is clear, and you can keep going.


As for my own advice to aspiring authors, I love the way Anne states it on page 19 of her book: "If you are all inspiration and creativity with no discipline and focus, then your wonderful ideas never make their way from the brain to the world." In other words, just sit down and write. That's really all it comes down to.


Many thanks to Anne for her insight! You can find more tips from her at annejanzer.com.


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

You may also be interested in...

Writing Tip: Stay Committed to the Process

Writing Tip: Just Keep Going

937 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, writing_tips, the_writer's_process
0

I like uncertainty--not in life, but in fiction. Think about it. There is pleasure in not knowing, in being surprised, in being shocked even when reading a novel. Unexpected moments can make an otherwise adequate story a truly memorable and great story.


Most writers understand this aspect of storytelling. They know to shake things up and try to give the reader something they didn't see coming. They know this until it comes to the ending. I see too many authors try to give an ending that closes all the loopholes, answers all the lingering questions, and satisfies the readers' expectations. Some endings read like summaries for the entire novel, and that is a major misstep.


Uncertainty, that element that kept your readers riveted and turning the page, is also an element that can make for a perfect ending. The readers don't have to close the book with all the answers. In fact, I would make the argument that a book that ends with questions is a better option. Readers are left to entertain their own possible conclusions based on what they know from your story. They become participants, not just readers.


Don't get caught up in putting too fine a point on the ending of your book. Trust your readers' ability to think their way through the unknowns and find an ending on their own. It's a risk, yes, but I think you'll discover more discussion surrounding your story when you choose to end it with uncertainty.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

A Satisfactory Ending

When Do You Know The Ending?

579 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, ending, uncertainty, fiction_writing
7

Do you spend hours tinkering with a single paragraph to get it just right? I used to do that too. When you're not sure what to write next, do you go back and polish what you've already written? Same here. When I was writing my first novel, Perfect on Paper, I spent a lot of time tweaking every little thing. In fact, some days I wouldn't write anything new because I'd spend all my time (and mental energy!) improving what was already there.


For a long while I thought this "always editing" approach was a productive use of my creative spirit. I finally realized it was the opposite of productive, that in fact, it was a crutch that I was using to avoid doing the hardest part of writing a novel, which is pushing the story forward.


In my opinion, coming up with an idea that is interesting enough for an entire book is the hardest part of being an author. (And on a more granular level, deciding what will happen chapter by chapter.) Once I determine what a scene is going to be, writing it is easy. I now realize that I can––and will––go back and tweak later, after I've finished the first draft.


Because of all the editing I did along the way, it took me 18 months to finish the first draft of Perfect on Paper, and I still ended up doing a ton of editing after the fact.


Since then I've written seven more novels––and none of the first drafts took me more than four months to write. It's always tempting to go back and edit, especially when I'm having trouble thinking of what to write next, but I force myself to stay focused and press the story forward. Write now, edit later. The sooner you learn to do that, the sooner you'll have a completed first draft!


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in.


Save the Wordsmithing for Later

Writing Tip: Just Keep Going

6,403 Views 7 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, editing, author, writing, rewriting
0

I'm not a huge best-selling author. I don't appear on morning talk shows. I don't own yachts, sports cars, or multiple homes. I'm just a regular guy who writes and publishes books. I sell enough to put a smile on my face and encourage me to keep writing and publishing.


I say all that to say this: there is a very successful author out there who has acquired incredible wealth through his writing. So, he's hit a sweet spot I haven't yet found. He knows the marketing end of the business better than anyone, and yet, I'm not wild about a trend he's trying to start. He's writing and publishing short books that, in his words, don't include the boring parts.


I like the boring parts. Stories have a rhythm, a beat, if you will. That rhythm, in my opinion, needs the boring parts to balance out the action. Stories have to have room to breathe. They need spots where you develop character in quiet moments. These quiet moments reflect reality. Realism draws readers in and allows them to make connections with characters. These connections create avid readers who become totally engrossed in a story. It seems to me that a book without the boring parts creates casual readers who don't experience any sacred moments in the reading of such a book.


Embrace the boring parts. Allow yourself the room to draw your readers in. Buck the trend. Take the risk. Your readers will love you and your book for it.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

The Boring Parts of a Novel

Exposition or Extraneous?

866 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, author, writing, story_development
0

By far the most common complaint I hear from indie authors is, "I have no clue about marketing!" A close second is, "I have no money to spend on marketing!"


Here are two things you can do that won't cost you more than time and effort:


1.    Reach out to book clubs and offer to attend their meetings (or call in) if they select your book


A great way to find book clubs is to create a free account on meetup.com. Using keywords, you can search for appropriate groups either near where you live or across the country. Each group has a "contact the organizer" button, so get in touch! Every book club I've attended has been thrilled for the chance to meet a real live author. (While your humble self may think it's not a big deal that you wrote a book, for most readers it is a big deal!)


2.    Look up alumni chapters of your alma mater and ask to be featured in their newsletters


To find local chapters, go to the national alumni page of your college or university--you'd be amazed at how many there are, even for tiny schools. Many of those groups have a monthly or quarterly electronic newsletter and are thirsty for interesting content about fellow alums. (This is another reason why having a brief and compelling description, cover art, and a professional headshot are so important. And if you have a website they can link to, even better!)


Note: Many college alumni chapters also have a book club, so be sure to ask if they do. Your book may not be a fit for the makeup of the group, but you never know.


For the above campaigns I strongly recommend tracking your efforts on a spreadsheet. If the only record of your outreach is the outbox of your email program, following up is going to be difficult. Now start pitching!


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Three grassroots marketing tips to put in place today

How to throw a book launch party for free

1,227 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, book_promotion, newsletter, book_clubs
0

Writing a novel comes easier to me when I know the title of the book I'm writing. I can't explain it, but once I have the title ensconced in the creative centers of my brain, I tend to find the "zone" effortlessly. When a title hasn't taken root yet, I'm more prone to meander and get distracted, making for a far from satisfying writing session.


For me, the title reflects the tone of the book, and for me, tone is a big part of finding comfort with a story. It establishes the emotional baseline of the book, and that is key for developing character and defining the rhythm of a story.


Jaws by Peter Benchley is a perfect example of how a title reflects the tone of a novel. You know by the title that fear is the emotional baseline of the story. The word "jaws' alone is enough to inform the reader that something sinister may be afoot. You don't need to see the cover. You don't even need to know that the book is about a giant shark. The title hints at a terror-infused story.


Now, I have no idea if Benchley came up with the title first or if it came at some other point during the writing process, but based on my experience as a writer, as soon as the title is chosen, it influences the writing choices thereafter. Whether it's the first draft or rewrites. I would be surprised if the title Jaws didn't affect the tone of Benchley's book once it was established.


What is your process? Does the title come before you write, or does it come after you start writing?


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Can your book title affect the way you write?

What is the tone of your novel?

851 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, novel, writing, title
1 2 3 ... 38 Previous Next

Actions