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675 Posts tagged with the self_publishing tag
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Twenty seventeen is behind us, and it's time to build your brand in 2018. Here are three strategies to make your brand bigger and better in the coming year.


1. Pick a lane. I know I've encouraged you to spread yourself around on as many social media platforms as you can manage, but 2018 is the time to switch gears. Pick one social media site to spend a large majority of your time. Make one site yours. Treat it like your home and build your community with confidence.


2. Make it your mission to cultivate influencers in your genre. Influencers have large followings, and they boost book sales as well as boost your own community's numbers. Tag them in posts. Private message them to let them know when you blog about them. And, yes, find reasons to blog about them. I'm not suggesting you heap artificial praise upon them. I'm suggesting you honor their status as influencer and get on their good side.


3. Twenty eighteen will be no different than 2017 in one aspect. The content you post has to be share-worthy in order to be useful. You're a writer, a creative person, creating share-worthy content is not beyond your grasp. It is very much in your wheelhouse. It's what you do.


In a lot of ways, the list looks familiar to last year's. Technologies will no doubt change how we use social media, but the methodology will always remain pretty much the same. Build a following on a platform. Interact and build relationships with influencers, and content is and always will be king.  


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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You are the brand not your book

Your brand's obit

1,153 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, branding
1

 

If your book is done and published, you've already learned that the first question most people ask when they find out you've written a book is, "What's it about?"


Do you have a good answer to that question? If not, you might have a problem.


Coming up with a good hook (or angle, or one-line description) isn't easy, but it's important. Movies are supposed to have good hooks, but sometimes they can get away with "STARRING INSERT HUGE NAME HERE." That doesn't fly with a book, especially one that doesn't have a massive marketing machine behind it.


To come up with a compelling one-line description, I suggest you brainstorm a handful - they don't have to be polished or even grammatically correct at first - and then try them out on people you trust to be straight with you. This is important, because while many people like to help, not everyone is cut out to provide honest feedback. Do you have a friend who has no problem sending a meal back at a restaurant if it's not cooked just right? That's the kind of person you want for this job!


Even if your helpers haven't read your book, you should be able to tell by their facial expressions if they find your description interesting. Your initial options should be quite different, which will allow you to pick one that generates the best reaction. For example, should the one-liner be about a fire that devastated a neighborhood, or a burned jewelry box that revealed a family secret? Those things could both be true about your story, but which one gets the best reaction from your test group?


After you've narrowed down the options to one or two key angles, play around with a handful of descriptions for each angle, then whittle the overall list down again. Keep repeating this process until you have a winner!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Grab Readers' Attention with Your Hook

Kick-start your year with these two marketing ideas

639 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writers, hook, one-liner
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What is a blog tour?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 19, 2017

A blog tour, also sometimes called a virtual book tour, is when a number of book blogs post a review of a title during a set period of time, e.g. a couple weeks or a month, usually right around when the book launches. As with a traditional book tour, the goal of a virtual one is to create "buzz" by reaching avid readers (i.e. potential customers) through multiple channels. If they suddenly see your book popping up everywhere, they are more likely to check it out - or so the thinking goes. Along with a book review, the blog may also feature an author spotlight, a Q&A, a guest post, a giveaway, an excerpt of the book, or a combination of any of those things, depending on what you're willing to do.


If you're raising your eyebrows right now wondering what book blogs are, they're exactly what they sound like: blogs dedicated entirely (usually) to book reviews. I say "usually" because some also review additional products according to the taste of the blog's owner.


There are plenty of companies that will coordinate a blog tour for a fee (a simple Internet search will turn up many), but you can also set one up yourself if you have the time and the energy. All you need to do is reach out to book bloggers (ideally a few months before your book comes out) and politely ask them if they'd like to review your book. You can also offer to do a Q&A, a guest post, etc. (Click here to see my post on how to find book bloggers.) Always offer to email a MOBI or PDF file, which doesn't cost you anything. If a blogger will only accept print copies, be sure to request the book rate at the post office to keep your costs down.


It takes a lot of coordination and follow-up to set up a blog tour on your own, but you can do it. I promise!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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What Is a Virtual Book Tour?

Marketing tip: How to find book bloggers

703 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, blog_tour
1

Always be learning

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 18, 2017

When I was younger, I entered the world of sales for a company that sold professional grade audio visual equipment. I jumped into the job with enthusiasm because I was familiar with the equipment as an end user. I thought I knew everything I needed to know to sell the equipment I knew so well. I was wrong. I would soon learn that, as much as writing, selling is a craft.


My boss sat me down on my first day and gave me a quick tutorial on sales. "There are two things you need to know about sales," he said. "One, once you ask the customer if they are going to buy, shut up. Don't say another word. If you talk first, you've lost the sale. Two, remember your ABC's. Always Be Closing. Introduce yourself, get the customer's name, repeat the customer's name, make your pitch, and then ask them how they want to pay. The first time you ask, they're going to think you're crazy. The second time you ask, they're going to think you're a pushy salesman. The third time you ask, they're going to give you their credit card number." That was it. That was my only training before I got on the phones and started practicing the craft of sales.


When I turned to writing and publishing as a career, I realized the ABC principle could be applied to branding because branding, as much as sales and writing, is a craft. Instead of closing, I would substitute the concept of learning. Always Be Learning. It's the best way to grow your brand. Research and read about branding. When you run across a branding principle three times, incorporate it into your brand-building strategy. It may work. It may not, but the point is to constantly expose yourself to new ideas. It's the only way to structure a brand that can stand the test of time.


Always Be Learning.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Lasting Brand

Evaluating Your Author Brand

733 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions
1

LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) is free for a basic account, so if you don't already have a profile, I highly recommend creating one. Here are some ways to promote your writing along with your other professional accomplishments:


Include the cover image of your book as the background to your headshot


To change the blue template background that appears on most LinkedIn profiles, click on the little pencil on the right side of your profile. That will open the Edit Intro window. Once inside the window, click on the little pencil on the upper right side to upload a file from your computer. (See my LinkedIn profile for an example.)


Describe your writing style and website in your headline and/or summary


The headline appears directly below your headshot, and the summary appears a few inches below that (beneath the city in which you live). To edit either or both, click on the little pencil on the right side of your profile. For example, my headline says "Bestselling novels, about life, love and friendship," and my summary says, "I write contemporary fiction and occasionally give speeches on the crazy story behind how I became an author: www.mariamurnane.com." (Depending on your profession, you might prefer to have your headline about your day job and your summary about your book.)


Add writer/author to your work history


Even if you have a full-time job, why not cite that you're also an author in your work history? Scroll down to the Experience section of your profile and click on the little pencil to open the Edit Experience window. When asked to name an employer for your author position, add your author website.


Add your book (or books) to your profile


Scroll down the Accomplishments section and click on the "+" icon to open the window. One of the options to click is Publications. Here you can include a description of your book(s), as well as links to purchase pages on Amazon.


Note: In addition to individual profiles, LinkedIn also hosts countless private groups that could prove helpful in providing networking opportunities, e.g. college alumni, fraternity/sorority clubs, writing groups, etc. It's worth poking around to see what you can find!


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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How big is your digital footprint?

Are you making this marketing mistake?

674 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, linkedin
1

In a recent post, I explained the importance of obstacles as a way to bring conflict into your story. Another way to create conflict is to consider multiple ways a character could view a situation—then have her choose the worst one. Why do this? Because how your character responds to this choice shows your readers who that character truly is.


For example, let's say that Gloria, your protagonist, has just exited a deli with a bag of warm bagels when she spots Alison, a classmate from her weekly photography class, walking half a block ahead. Gloria picks up her phone and dials Alison's number, only to see Alison screen the call and toss her phone into her purse without answering it.


What does Gloria think about this situation?


If she thinks, "Alison's probably thinking about something important so doesn't have time to chat right now," where's the conflict?


However, imagine that Gloria thinks, "Alison just sent me to voice mail! Maybe she doesn't like me!" Now you have something interesting for your readers to chew on.


The way you have Gloria respond to her line of thought will show your readers what kind of person she is. Does she throw a bagel at Alison and make a joke about it? Does she go back to her office, shut her door, and eat the entire bag of bagels? Does she avoid Alison in class, or does she make a point of sitting next to her and chatting her up? Those questions are for you to answer, but how you choose to do so is a wonderful way to provide insight into Gloria.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Advice on Character Development

First person or third person? That is the question.

660 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_development, character_flaws
0

Today's blog topic can be best summarized by bestselling author Neil Gaiman.


Start telling the stories that only you can tell, because there'll always be better writers than you and there'll always be smarter writers than you. There will always be people who are much better at doing this or doing that - but you are the only you.


Allow me to make two points about this quote:


1. Gaiman isn't suggesting you write without confidence. He's not saying you aren't a good-to-great writer by saying there will always be better and smarter writers than you. I believe he's saying putting all your efforts into being the best writer on the planet is fruitless because ours is an industry that is based on the opinions of readers and those opinions are as varied as snowflakes. In essence, trying to get everyone to love you by trying to be brilliant leads to poor writing.


2. Gaiman is saying that the only thing that you can do brilliantly is being you. There is no one on the planet that can "out you" you when it comes to writing. Don't try to write a better horror novel. Try to write a horror novel that expresses your artistic nature, one that entertains you and stays true to the development of your characters. The same advice goes for any genre. Sure, the influence of the writers you admire and inspired you to be a writer will show in you writing, but there will be something slightly different about your writing, and that something different is you.


Be what other writers can't be. Be you.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Great American Novel

You are the change that keeps the publishing industry relevant

712 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, genre
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More than once in the past few weeks I've heard the word "reactionary" used to describe someone who reacts or has reacted to something. I flinch each time this happens, because the word that should be used in these cases is "reactive."


Reactive vs. Reactionary


  • Reactive means responsive, or reacting to something.
    • His reactive nature drove him to address the problem before it had a chance to develop into something serious.

 

  • Reactionary means ultraconservative in politics.
    • His reactionary style invigorated his conservative followers while infuriating his detractors.


Do you see how confusing the two could inadvertently lead to a problem in today's environment?


Here are some other words that sound quite similar but have different meanings:


Historic vs. Historical


  • Historic means having great importance or lasting meaning.
    • Neil Armstrong's moonwalk was a historic moment for mankind.
  • Historical means something based on facts of history.
    • Gloria's book is a historical romance set in the English countryside one hundred years ago.


Literally vs. Figuratively


  • Literally means in a literal (true/real) manner.
    • Gloria wanted to buy a pack of gum, but there were literally zero people working behind the counter.
  • Figuratively means in a figurative (not real) manner.
    • I'm speaking figuratively when I say that Gloria thought Dave was going to make her die laughing.


One of my closest friends uses "literally" when she's not speaking literally SO FREQUENTLY that it (figuratively) drives me nuts. For example:


  • I was so hungry this morning that I literally thought I was going to starve to death. (INCORRECT)
    • Why it's incorrect: My friend might have been hungry, but it's highly unlikely that she truly believed she was going to starve to death.


What words do you hear being used incorrectly? Please share in the comments!


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Don't Cook Your Family, Rachael!

Solving the Mystery of Lie vs. Lay

626 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, grammar, grammar_tip
0

You never know when you're going to meet someone who wants to buy your book, so it's good to always have a copy handy. But not everyone carries around cash or a checkbook, so I highly recommend the following three payment options:


  1. PayPal
  2. Venmo
  3. Square


PayPal

If you have a free PayPal account (www.paypal.com), others who have a PayPal account can send money directly from their account to yours without a transaction fee. They can also send money through a credit card, in which case you can decide if you or they pay the transaction fee. (This is a judgment call you will have to make.) With PayPal you can also send someone a "payment request" via email, which is essentially a stripped-down invoice.


Venmo

All the rage with Millennials and also free, Venmo (www.venmo.com) account holders can send each other money on their mobile phones at no cost by entering in the recipient's phone number, email address, or Venmo username into the Venmo app. Payments can also be made through the Venmo website.


Square

With a free Square (www.square.com) card reader that plugs into your mobile phone, you can swipe credit cards for a small per-transaction fee. As with PayPal, it's up to you to decide whether to pay the fee or pass it along to the buyer. In my experience, most people are happy to pay a little extra for the convenience of using a card.


If these options seem like too much of a hassle, look at it this way: You want to make it easy for those who express a sincere interest in buying your book to do so. Yes, they can always go online later and order a copy, but even those with the best of intentions can easily get busy and forget. I'd put that percentage in the ballpark of...very high. Why take that chance?


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

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Marketing tip: always carry a book with you

A holiday book marketing idea


758 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, publishing, writing, payment, promotions
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Learning the ins and outs of marketing a book can be a daunting task. There is so much to learn and so few opportunities to put that knowledge to use. It takes months to write a book and weeks to rewrite a book and get it ready for publication. That leaves you a relatively short amount of time to put your marketing acumen to use before your focus is shifted to your next book.


You need to keep your marketing mind sharp, and the best way to do that is to actively market a book, but it doesn't have to be your book. Why not use that marketing know-how and market a book for another indie author?  Partner with another author, and share your knowledge. Not for payment, but for the experience.


I know, I know. You have your own book or books to worry about. You have writing to do. You have a day job, a family, friends, etc. Who has time to help another indie author market a book?


Don't think of this as extracurricular activity. This is part of the education of an indie author. This is how you hone your skills and grow your marketing knowledge. This is how you help market your own book. This is also how you create a partner. Someone who will feel the tug to help you market your book when you publish your next tome.


In short, this isn't more work for you to tackle. This is an opportunity for you to sell more books. 


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Uniting author brands

Selling others sells yourself

528 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing
1

Make a change

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 13, 2017

I have been experiencing a bit of a dry spell lately. To be frank, I have been inundated by stress. I have a strong suspicion that I'm not alone on this. We all face stress, and we all deal with it in different ways. Writing used to be how I dealt with it, but when you sit down at the keyboard and nothing of significance happens, a new kind of stress hits you, and it compounds your problem. Your confidence in your imagination begins to slip, and there is nothing worse for a writer to face than a lack of confidence.


Then a few days ago a funny thing happened on my way to total self-annihilation. I took a train trip. This is not my normal mode of transportation. I normally jump in my car and hit the highways, but it just made more sense for me to take the train for this particular excursion. As I sat in my back-gnarling seat, a flash of an image came to me. It happened quite by accident. I didn't take my seat with the purpose of jump starting my imagination, but there it was, a genuine story idea.


So, why did it happen? How did this story come to me? I can't say for sure, but I think it's because I made a change to my normal routine. I found myself in an unfamiliar setting, one where I lacked any kind of control over my environment, and my brain just sort of reset. That's the only way I can explain it.


Here's my advice to you if you are so stressed that you can't write. Make a change. One in which you give up control of your surroundings. One in which you are forced to be a simple "passenger." If my theory is right, your brain will reset, and your writer's block will come tumbling down.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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How to Kick-Start Creativity

Write o'clock

1,008 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, stress, writer's_block
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National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is here! Aspiring authors around the world are challenging themselves to complete the first draft of a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 p.m. on November 30. That's no easy feat, especially if you have a day job, but it can be done. The key is to put yourself on a schedule and stick to it.


For example, you could be:


A)   Writing 1,600-1,700 words each day, including weekends

B)   Writing 2,500 words each Saturday and Sunday, plus 1,300-1,400 words each weekday

C)   Writing 5,000 words each weekend, plus 1,300-1,400 words each weekday

D)  Pounding out 12,500 words each weekend


When I'm writing a novel, I give myself a daily word count quota, Monday through Friday, and don't let myself go sleep until I've reached it. That way I don't get behind and stress myself out. (I tend to get stressed out easily, so this approach works for me.) If I wrote on the weekends, my daily quota would be considerably lower, but I need that mental break to stay fresh and engaged. Other writers prefer writing every single day. Do you see my point? We're all different, and that's perfectly fine! What's the point of trying to conform to someone else's schedule if it doesn't work for you?


Some authors like to put a detailed outline in place first before they write a single word, while others say outlines are a complete waste of time. Again, I believe that you should do what works for your creative spirit and not worry about what anyone else says. Writing novels is an art, not a science.


Are you participating in NaNoWriMo? If so, please share your approach in the comments. I'd love to see how varied the responses are so we can all learn from each other!


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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The Milestones You Should Track during NaNoWriMo

How to Write a Novel in a Month

 

665 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, writing, nanowrimo, word_count, writing_strategy
1

Setting goals

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 6, 2017

Before you set out on a journey, it's a good idea to know your destination, otherwise you'll never know when you've arrived. The same can be said about achieving your goals. You're never going to know if you've achieved your goals if you don't know what your goals are. It's just simple logic.


You can't develop a marketing strategy until you define what will make your marketing efforts a success. Well, you can, but you shouldn't. Not defining what your marketing goals are will leave you frustrated and unfulfilled. Marketing should be by the numbers. Meaning, decide how many friends and followers you want in your social media circle. How many books do you want to sell? How many views do you want for a video? Know how to define your success so you can celebrate and improve.


Don't choose arbitrary goals. As an example, don't simply declare that you're going to sell a million books and then design a marketing plan that you think will achieve that goal. That's not how it's done. Set numerous goals. How many friends and followers do you want to connect with in the next three months? How many groups can you join and promote your book over the next three months? How many videos can you produce and post over the next three months? Set a goal for every platform and segment of your marketing strategy. You have at your disposal a world of information. I am, of course, talking about the Internet. Do your due diligence, and find realistic goals. I repeat, don't set arbitrary goals.


Set your goals and know what you can count as successes along the way.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Setting Goals for Your Brand

A Marketing Calendar

848 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, marketing_strategy, setting_goals
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When's the last time you sent a handwritten thank-you note in the mail? When's the last time you received one? If you've sent or received even one within the past year, you're probably in the minority. So think about what a positive impression you can make by sending one when appropriate. Everyone likes to feel appreciated!


Here are some examples of where a physical thank-you note could (not will—no guarantees in book promotion!) make a difference in your marketing efforts:


  • A reviewer who has a mountain of books in her to-be-read (TBR) pile. A thank-you note for "taking the time to read my book" might bump your title to the top of that stack. (Note: be sure to sign the book too.)
  • The editor of an alumni publication that mentioned your book. Your thank-you note might open the door to other opportunities for coverage down the road, e.g. a profile, or an invitation to participate in a regional alumni event.
  • The organizer of a book club that has selected your book. People who run book clubs are usually voracious readers who love to talk about books - and about the time they got a real thank-you note from an author. The more people who talk about you and your book, the better.
  • The organizer of a book club that hasn't selected your book because there are too many books currently in front of yours. A personalized "thanks for considering my book" note might increase your chances of being the book club's selected read down the road.


Ask a hundred authors if there's a magic formula for selling books, and you'll probably get close to a hundred NO answers. But ask a hundred people if they like receiving thank-you notes in the mail, and I bet you'll get close to a hundred YES answers. So what do you have to lose? It certainly can't hurt, and, as a bonus, it feels pretty good to do something nice for someone else.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Use a personal touch when reaching out or following up

The power of a personal connection

816 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, thank-you_notes
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I am constantly in search of ways to build a brand. I come across article after article that breaks down the brand-building process into easily executable steps. I'm sure I've even written an article or two that features similar steps. Although, I hope I never presented the steps as easy. Granted, it's not rocket science, but building a brand is anything but easy.


One element of the process is particularly hard. Hard might be the wrong word. It is laborious, but it is a labor of love. I am, of course, talking about the quality of writing. Building a brand around a poorly written book is nearly impossible. I can sense some of you screaming, "There are plenty of badly written books that become bestsellers!" I agree, but those are exceptions to the rule, not the rule itself. An author who pens a poorly written bestseller or bestselling series rarely repeats the feat.


If you want a brand that will stand the test of time, you have to invest significant time into developing your craft, and you don't just develop your craft by writing. You develop your craft by studying the masters, attending workshops, mentoring other writers. You develop your craft by challenging yourself to grow as an artist.


A brand built on good writing has the potential to be more than financially rewarding. It can be utterly fulfilling. It is worth the investment of your time, and it will make the rest of the steps to building an author brand just a tad easier.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The foundation of your brand

That one thing

756 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, branding, author_brand
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