Skip navigation
1 2 3 4 ... 42 Previous Next

Resources

625 Posts tagged with the self_publishing tag
2

Character traps

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 22, 2017

Writing fiction, if you do enough of it, presents itself with traps that can get authors in trouble. Here are three character traps to avoid as you pen your next masterpiece.


  1. Know-it-all: One thing that drives me crazy when I read a mystery novel is when one character, many times a crack detective, has all the answers. What kind of poison was used to kill the victim? Well, it just so happens that our protagonist got a degree in chemistry. Figuring out the poison used is really no problem. Also, if you have questions about the victim's last meal, the type of watch he wore, the kind of razor he shaved with, etc., it just so happens the protagonist has read and committed to memory dozens of books on these topics and more. When a "know-it-all" takes over a story I'm reading, I lose interest because it's just too convenient.
  2. All-bad: When a villain is nothing but bad, I don't really get invested in him or her as much as I should. I want there to be something likable about the villain--some redeeming quality. In a way, it makes him or her more sinister if I fall into a false sense of security that the villain will do the right thing. When he or she doesn't, it's even more shocking.
  3. All-good: This is the inverse trap to the previous one. All-good protagonists are, in a word, boring. Flaws give a character depth and relatability. I can't identify with a character who has never done anything wrong and doesn't have doubts sometimes about whether he or she is making the right choice.


Take some time to examine your characters and make sure they're not falling into these traps. If they are, try rewriting to make them more complex.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

 

Your Characters, Warts and All

 

The Basic Elements of a Character Arc

950 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, characterization, character_traps
1

 

Hyphens are used to avoid ambiguity when two descriptive words are next to each other before a noun. (They are also used for compound words such as self-esteem.)

 

For example, take the following sentence:

 

The small business owner got a great loan from the bank.

 

Is the business owner who got a great loan small? Or does the person who got a great loan own a small business? Most likely it's the latter, but without a hyphen it's unclear, which is why a hyphen is necessary in this case.

 

The small-business owner got a great loan from the bank. (CORRECT)

The small business owner got a great loan from the bank. (INCORRECT)

 

Here's another example:

 

The hard charging executive took a vacation.

 

Is the executive hard? Or does the executive charge hard? Most likely it's the latter, but again without a hyphen it's unclear, which is why a hyphen is also necessary in this case.

 

  • The hard-charging executive took a vacation. (CORRECT)
  • The hard charging executive took a vacation. (INCORRECT)

 

Where I often see hyphens being used incorrectly is when an adverb is next to a descriptive word before a noun. Adverbs (usually words ending in ly) modify only verbs or adjectives and not nouns, so there is no need for a hyphen.

 

For example:

 

  • The highly regarded professor gave a lecture. (CORRECT)
  • The highly-regarded professor gave a lecture. (INCORRECT)

 

  • The newly hired caterer got straight to work. (CORRECT)
  • The newly-hired caterer got straight to work. (INCORRECT)

 

  • The recently promoted director took the corner office. (CORRECT)
  • The recently-promoted director took the corner office. (INCORRECT)

 

If the above examples have you squinting at your screen in puzzlement, try taking away the descriptive word in each sentence:

 

  • The highly professor gave a lecture. (MAKES NO SENSE)
  • The newly caterer got straight to work. (MAKES NO SENSE)
  • The recently director took the corner office. (MAKES NO SENSE)

 

Got it? If there's no ambiguity about what a word is modifying, then there's no need for a hyphen.

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Quick lesson on hyphens

 

Don't cook your family, Rachel!

662 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, hyphenation, grammar_tip
0

One of the most crucial jobs you have as an author is to build character. Not your own, of course, although you are most likely going to learn something about yourself during the course of writing a novel. I am speaking of building character in the fictional sense. Different authors have different ways they go about building characters. Some authors do background stories. Some do fake obituaries that enable them to see characters from the point of view of other fictional characters. Some authors stick to existing archetypes and follow a blueprint that's been used before.


And then there are those authors who hold true to the philosophy that adversity builds character. They will throw a character into a meat grinder starting on page one and let the conflict itself build a character. For my money, it's not a bad philosophy. It's called the empty-vessel strategy, and it can be very effective at drawing a reader in. Think about it. There are no pre-conceived notions about the protagonist from the start of the story, so readers can put themselves in the characters' shoes and grow with them.


This method has its downside. You run the risk of not allowing readers to care about the character early on in the story, and readers may reject the choices the character makes because it's not something they would do. The trick is to make the choices so difficult that readers literally can't decide what they would do if they were in your protagonist's position. The hard choice made will then be appreciated and accepted.


Conflict not only drives a story. It can also build character.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

What would your characters do?

Building character

623 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_development, characterization
1

Today's rule could essentially be summed up in the Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young song, "Teach Your Children." The song is a classic that encourages us to pass along our knowledge of life to all the generations without judgment or expectation of anything in return. I know it sounds kind of heavy for a branding strategy, but the more young writers you selflessly help along the way, the greater service you do for the community of writers and society as a whole. And, yes, even though you shouldn't expect a return on your investment of time and knowledge, you most likely will receive enormous returns in the form of loyal disciples of your brand.


So, I say to you, seasoned writer, teach aspiring authors well. Share your dream with them. Find opportunities to assist other writers in achieving their dreams. Give them constructive feedback on their manuscripts. Help them navigate the indie publishing world. Give them marketing and branding advice. You may even encourage them to pass along what they know to up-and-coming writers.


Being an author is being part of a community. We don't have competitors. We have fellow authors. By helping to strengthen the community, you are helping yourself in the most unselfish way possible. You can't go wrong with this strategy. I don't care where you are in your writing career. You have useful knowledge to share. You probably don't even have to dig that deep to find it.


Grow your brand by following the rule of coaching, and teach the writers well.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Bring Your Community Together through Writing

Your Brand is a Community

945 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, promotion, writing, branding, author_brand
1

An essential element of any book marketing campaign is securing reviews on Amazon, Goodreads, book blogs, etc. However, to get reviewers to read your book, you're going to have to send them a copy. That generally means buying print copies, packing them up, then schlepping back and forth to the post office. This process can become time-consuming and expensive, especially if you're contacting a lot of people.


Another option is to send reviewers digital copies via Amazon. Given how much cheaper most digital books are compared to their print counterparts, this is a great way to get your work out there without breaking the bank. (Tech-savvy reviewers might be up for receiving MOBI files, which don't cost anything to email, so if you're techy too, you can always try that.)


Have you ever bought a digital book on Amazon as a gift? If not, here's all you have to do:


  1. Click the "Give as a Gift" option among the purchase buttons on the right side of the page
  2. Enter the email address linked to the recipient's Amazon account (Be sure to ask the reviewer for this information because sometimes people use a different address for online shopping than they do for other things. I know I do!)
  3. Enter the recipient's name
  4. Type in a personal note
  5. Click "Place your order"


That's it! Within minutes the recipient will receive an email from Amazon with a link to download your book to his or her Kindle device or reading app. For the diehard reviewers who insist on reading print copies only, you can still do the post office thing. Just remember to request the book rate. It's way cheaper than regular mail.


An added bonus of sending your book via Amazon is that you get a royalty for each one you buy, which brings down your overall cost. (This also applies for print versions you gift directly from Amazon, which will also save you that trip to the post office.) So what are you waiting for? Get pitching!


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Get Reviews for Your Indie Book

Dos and Don'ts of Soliciting Book Reviews

1,240 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, blogging, writing, book_reviews
1

There is a popular show on a streaming service that I had been anxious to watch, given the buzz that it had generated. So, I set aside a Saturday to watch as many episodes as I could squeeze in. I got my coffee, buttered some toast, sat down in front of the TV early in the morning, and started the first episode. It was compelling from the opening shot. I was sucked into it immediately. There was something about the show that I found relatable. It seemed almost familiar.


By the end of the first episode, I realized it was just that--familiar. It was similar to the theme and structure of a series of young adult novels I had written. It wasn't exactly the same, but the similarities were there. It was undeniable. I didn't want to think that someone had stolen my idea, but I still couldn't get the thought out of my mind. So, I did a little research on the show's creators and learned that they had been influenced by the same decade in which I came of age. Suddenly, it became clear. They hadn't stolen anything from me. We had just grown up during the same era. We shared the same cultural references.


It is possible to write a book that is similar to another book without having any knowledge of the story beforehand. It happens. Don't get discouraged if you discover your book is similar to someone else's. Keep writing. Publish. There is room for different takes on the same plot. Your writing style will be enough to set it apart.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

 

Give Author Modeling a Try

 

How to be a Confident Writer

560 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, author, writing, story_ideas
3

I am of the mind that when it comes to including a character's physical features in a book, the fewer the better. I know I am probably on the rare side of this debate, but even as a reader, I prefer scant physical descriptions as opposed to a detailed list of soft curves and sculpted physiques. If a description serves a narrative purpose, I'm fine with it, but a lot of times it feels as if physical descriptions are included to give the reader a sense of what characters look like, and it can come off as wedged prose that sticks out like a sore thumb.


I am more interested in how characters move--how they fidget nervously or conduct themselves in pressurized situations with a steady hand. To me, that makes characters more relatable than the color of their eyes or how chiseled their chin is.


Don't get me wrong. I will include physical descriptions, but most (not all) are about scars, flaws, and imperfections that have shaped the characters. I find warts much more interesting than beauty marks, so I tend to give my characters a lot.


Recently, my editor asked me to include a line or two about a character's physical description, and I did, but it was not easy. I kept fighting myself. Eventually, I allowed myself to sprinkle scant descriptors in passages throughout the novel, so it didn't appear as if I was force-feeding the reader a physical description of the character.


How about you? Where do you fall on the physical features debate? More or fewer?


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Defining Characters through Action, Not Description

Connect with Your Characters

896 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_development, characterization
0

Reaching out to book bloggers is a great way to get objective, credible reviews. In addition to posting their reviews on their own websites, many bloggers are also active on social media, which can draw additional eyeballs to your work. (For example, here's a recent tweet by a blogger promoting her thoughts on my latest novel, Bridges.)


Like most people, reviewers often have particular genres they prefer to read. Below are some ways to find bloggers who might be a good fit for your book. These are not the only ways, but they will definitely help you find a lot of people to pitch:


  • Search the titles of popular books that are like yours, plus the word "review," then scroll through the results and see which are book blogs.
  • Search "book blog" plus words that describe your genre, e.g., "mystery," "romance," "thriller," "memoir," etc.
  • Search for companies that specialize in "blog tours." Many of them feature the "stops" on the tour, i.e., the bloggers they got to review their clients' books. Look for a book in your genre, and there you will find a list of relevant bloggers to pitch.


Once you find a blog that looks perfect for you, look to see which blogs that blogger follows. (There is usually a list on either side of the home page.) Click on one, then go back and repeat the process. Soon you will have a big list of bloggers to contact.


NOTE: When you start pitching, track your correspondence. I use a spreadsheet for this, but any system that works for you will do. Just use a system, or your hard work will eventually become a confusing mess. (Scrolling through the sent folder of your email is not a "system.") Recording your outreach can be a pain, but it's well worth the effort. Not only will it keep you organized now, it will keep you from having to start from scratch when your next book comes out.


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Marketing tip: connect with book bloggers

Don't make this marketing mistake

834 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, blogging, writing, promotions, bloggers, marketing_tip
0

We've talked about the rule of consistency in branding. That is to say, you have a look, style, and message that is associated with your brand, and if you make drastic changes to any element of your brand along the way, you run the risk of losing your brand identity.


Today, I want to discuss a similar concept in branding. It's called the rule of repetition. It differs from the rule of consistency in that it is strictly centered on your messaging. There is a fast-food chain where you can have it your way. There is a soft drink on the market that is accompanied with a smile. There is an insurance company that claims you're in good hands. I didn't name one product in those three examples, but I'm guessing most of you know the product. Here, I'll include the slogans, minus the product name, and I'm more than confident you can provide the answers.


Have it your way at ____.


Have a ____ and a smile.


You're in good hands with ____.


Some of these slogans aren't even used anymore, but they are engrained in my memory banks. Why? Because I heard them over and over and over...and over again. The companies practically used the slogans on a constant loop. You, as a brand, should do the same thing. You won't necessarily come up with a slogan, but if you are a genre writer, include the genre in your brand. For example, you're not Jo B. Writer. You're Horror Author Jo B. Writer. If you'd rather focus on your accomplishments, then be Award-Winning Author Jo B. Writer or Best-selling Author Jo B. Writer. Always use it. Repeat the message whenever you can. Make it part of your email signature. Include it wherever you can. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in?

 

A Long Term Branding Strategy

How to Be Interesting Enough to Be a Brand

952 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, writing, social_media, author_brand, writing_advice
1

In a previous post, I discussed how useful beats are to show your readers instead of telling them. I also advised against using beats too often because it can dilute their effect. Another way to devalue the impact of beats is by telling readers what those beats are already showing.


For example, the following beats do a solid job of letting us know what the character is thinking:


  • He slammed his cup down so hard that it broke. (His actionshows us that he's angry.)
  • She rolled her eyes. (Her actionshows us that she's irritated/exasperated.)
  • She batted her eyelashes at him. (Her actionshows us that she's being flirtatious.)
  • He cocked his head to the side. (His action shows us that he's confused.)


When writers tell us what the beats are already showing us, it can become a problem if done too frequently. I recently read a novel in which the author included an explanation after almost every beat, and as a result I found myself repeatedly thinking, "Why is she telling me this? Doesn't she see how obvious it is that (insert name of character) is (insert adjective)?"


Here are some examples of what I mean:


  • He slammed his cup down so hard that it broke, furious.
  • She rolled her eyes, exasperated.
  • She batted her eyelashes at him, clearly flirting.
  • He cocked his head to the side, confused.


Am I the only one who finds these explanations unnecessary? I doubt it. Readers are smart, so respect that intelligence. We might all have a tendency to tell too much in the first draft, but that's what revisions are for! It's never fun to cut your own words, but your writing will be better for it, and your readers will appreciate it. I promise.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

 

Turn the Beat Around

 

Use Beats to Show, Not Tell

 

1,077 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, writing, promotions, action_beats, writing_tip, dialgue_tags
0

Compelling

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Apr 17, 2017

When I'm asked to describe a book I love, I will invariably use the word compelling to describe it. Whether it's the plot or the character development or some other element of the story, I have found something compelling about the book. The question is what does that really mean?


Yes, there is a clear definition of the word compelling. In short, it means I found the story irresistible. I can't tell you how to make a book irresistible in a quantifiable way. There's no formula that I can give and say, "Use this and your book will be compelling." I mean I could, but that would make me a con man who you should stay far away from.


But what I can do is tell you what I think makes a book compelling. I find a story compelling when it strikes one of two chords:


  1. It's familiar. I can relate to some aspect of the story. Either I recognize myself in the protagonist or I know the setting. I'm compelled to read more because I can picture myself living the story.
  2. It's plausible. Even in a fantasy-based story, if plausibility is the base on which the story is built, I find the story compelling. Sure a vampire might be terrorizing a town, but if some junk science is introduced that casts a shadow of plausibility on how vampires can exist, I will find the story more compelling. I don't even need full plausibility. I just need a sliver of, "Hmm, I suppose it's not totally out of the question." Of course, the more ironclad the plausibility, the greater my attraction to the story.


So, that's what makes a book compelling to me. What makes a story compelling to you?


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in…

The Horoscope Prompt

The Resolution Matrix

847 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, character_development, story_elements
0

A few years ago I attended a seminar on starting a small business, and each of the six or seven speakers I heard that day emphasized how important it is to build the list! At the time I remember thinking that was the one thing they all had in common. Now I am also thinking something else: they were right.


Building a mailing list takes time and effort, but it can be a valuable marketing tool, perhaps your most valuable marketing tool. Whether it's through regular email or a newsletter program such as Mailchimp or Constant Contact (I use Mailchimp), a mailing list allows you to keep in touch with the people who want to hear from you.


I always recommend a newsletter program over email, so people can opt in. Yes, they can also unsubscribe, and yes, it will sting when they do. But that shaking out is part of the process of getting a true list, which is what you want. With email, if someone doesn't want to hear from you, it's unlikely that she is going to reply and ask you to take her off your list. (Full disclosure: that happened to me once years ago when I was first starting out, and I will never forget it. Ouch!) A newsletter program also allows you to see how many people are opening your messages, which isn't possible with email.


The best way to build your list is to add a "join the mailing list" button to your website. (Yet another reason to have a website!) Another way is to ask people you meet--and who show a genuine interest in your writing--for their business cards or email addresses. And if anyone emails you about your book, that's also an opportunity.


Note: I strongly recommend asking before adding anyone to your list. The last thing you want to do is annoy potential readers, right? In my opinion, a little courtesy goes a long way.


-Maria


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Mailing List Dos and Don'ts

Two easy (and free!) ways to spread the word about your book

1,087 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, marketing_tools, marketing_tip
0

How to develop a plot

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Apr 10, 2017

There are lots of rules for developing a plot on the Internet these days. Most lists are the same old same old. Today, I'd like to give you a list of elements for developing plot that you may not have heard before. Use them as you see fit.


  1. Unknown: Your protagonist is driven by the unknown. Some unanswered question is gnawing at him or her, and the desire to find the answer is the force behind your plot. The question can be a "who," a "what," or a "why" question. An example is, "How does he get the woman across the hall to fall in love with him?"
  2. Stakes: Your protagonist has to have something at stake in order to push the plot forward. In the example above, he's trying to win the love of the woman across the hall. The stakes could be as simple as if he loses her, he will be letting the one perfect woman go, or it could be as complicated as his identity as a time traveler who's come back through time to make sure that his past self and the woman get together in order to save all of humanity.
  3. A touch of hopelessness: As you progress through the story, the reader must buy into a sense of hopelessness that the protagonist might not succeed. They have to buy that there are real consequences for failing. If your protagonist is constantly winning, then you're making the journey not quite as gripping as it could be. The conclusion of the story should feel like a sigh of relief or sadness. It shouldn't feel like an expected outcome.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Turning Subplots into Plots

The Time-Sensitive Plot Device

843 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_development, plot_development
2

 

The other day I was catching up with my friend and fellow author Andrea Dunlop, who is also a social media consultant. She mentioned that she'd had success promoting her debut novel, Losing the Light, on Instagram. Never having used the platform myself, I asked her if she could give me (and my loyal blog readers) some pointers, and she kindly agreed! Here's what she had to say:


A lot of authors are initially a bit baffled as to how to use such a visual medium for book promotion. To get you off on the right foot, here are four of the most common questions I get about Instagram from clients, answered:


  1. Who should use it? Any author can make great use of Instagram because, like Facebook and Twitter before it, the platform now has a critical mass of users, meaning that even niche books can find an audience with a bit of research and some canny use of hashtags. However, Instagram is especially good for any book that has visual elements (think cookbooks or design books) and books of any genre whose audience skews young and female. This is especially true for YA books but applies to plenty of literary and commercial adult fictions as well (and most fiction readers are female, FYI).
  2. What do I put on there? If you're using the platform primarily as an author, aim for at least 75% book-related posts. Note, I do not mean 75% posts about your book and your book only (please don't do that on any social media platform). Share reading recommendations, behind-the-scenes shots of your workspace, pictures of works-in-progress (marked up manuscripts, covers, page proofs, galleys) photos from book events, etc. Instagram gives you a lot of space to write captions, so take advantage and share some more in-depth thoughts on what you're reading or writing. You could really do all book posts if you wanted, but I think it's nice to use the platform to show off some of your personality as well with pictures pertaining to your hobbies, your pets, travel, where you live, etc. And don't forget hashtags! Some of the most popular for readers are #bookstagram, #instabook, #igreads, #bookish, and #booknerd.
  3. How frequently do I need to post? I recommend posting daily--three times per week at a minimum. Don't worry if it takes you a while to get the hang of taking photos, using filters, using hashtags, etc.
  4. What if I don't get very many followers? Not to worry. As with all social media, there's more to it than follower count. If you can build up several thousand followers or more, that's awesome, but you've got books to write, and this is but one platform in your overall marketing strategy. The best thing you can do is establish a relationship with readers and fellow bookstagrammers so that when you do have a book to share with them, you're already a part of a community who is excited to hear from you.


So, go, dive in! Feel the #bookish love. You can follow me (@andreadunlop), of course, and here are a few other authors who I think are killing it on the platform:

  • R. S. Grey (@authorrsgrey)
  • Tara Austen Weaver (@tea_austen)
  • Rachel Del (@racheldelxo)
  • Kevin Kwan (@kevinkwanbooks)
  • Liza and Lisa (@lisaandliz)


Many thanks to Andrea for sharing her expertise! To learn more about her consulting services, visit www.andreadunlop.net.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg


Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in...

Marketing tip: share what you've learned

Marketing tip: follow the 80/20 rule in social media

2,172 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, promotions, instagram
0

 

Your book has been on the market for a few years. Sales were brisk in the beginning, but they are virtually nonexistent now. Here's how to let the title go and stop promoting it. You may want to write this list down and post it somewhere in your writing space.


  1. Don't--DO NOT STOP PROMOTING.


Nope, it's not a long list, but it is important. There is no reason for you not to promote a book you wrote a year ago, five years ago, or even ten years ago. As long as you don't have inventory or a nonfiction book that contains a time-sensitive subject matter, why would you stop promoting your book?


Your book has a publishing anniversary. That's a perfect time to promote it every year. If your book has a seasonal theme, that season occurs every year. Why shouldn't you promote it? If your book is a work with a historical event or figure at its core, then that historical event has an anniversary. The historical figure has a birth date. Those are other opportunities to promote your book, no matter how old the book is.


Conventional wisdom used to be that you frontload the release of a book with all your publicity efforts, and then you move on. Print-on-demand and digital publishing has made that sort of publicity strategy obsolete. Your book will never go out of print. Why, then, would you stop promoting it? To not promote it is wasting opportunity.


Don't move on in the sense that you will forget about your book. Move on and write your next book. Promote your next book. Just don't forget your previous books when it comes to promotion.


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in?

 

The Marketing Maze

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

 

 

 

 

1,243 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, promotion, promotions, marketing_advice, promotion_advice
1 2 3 4 ... 42 Previous Next

Actions