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131 Posts tagged with the selling tag
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Beyond the book

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 25, 2017

In order to sell lots of books, you may have to release versions of your novel that go beyond the physical book. Here are three other media platforms that may help you build your community and sell more books.

 

1. Audiobook: In another time, they were called books on tape, and then CDs became the preferred format. When we started consuming digital audio files, audiobooks were born. An audiobook version of your novel is a natural transition. I have taken the leap, and I have to tell you I had a blast working on them. From selecting a narrator to uploading the files, developing an audiobook is a truly exhilarating process. The fact it can grow your readership (listenership) is a delightful bonus.

 

2. The stage: I know it sounds like a stretch, but a stage version of your book has the potential to grow your audience. Granted, that audience will be limited to the people in the theater, but social media gives them their own platform to tell their friends and followers about the adaptation of your book to a play. I attended a play in California where the playwright sold and signed copies of her book after the performance of her play based on the book. By the looks of it, she did very well.

 

3. Podcast: This is kind of a mixture of an audiobook and a stage play. The podcast version of your book mimics radio theater. Like a stage play, you would use actors to act out the parts. Unlike a stage play, you would serialize the material and present each segment via a podcasting service on the same day and at the same time. The hope is that you will build buzz as folks wait in anticipation for your next chapter.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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What makes you different?

The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

1,711 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: books, marketing, selling, promotion, podcast, audiobooks, platform
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When it comes to marketing, you're going to want to nail down the genre of your book as soon as you can. Yes, I know most authors know the genre before they even start writing, but a surprising number of authors reject the notion of genre fiction. Most do it as a misguided artistic choice, but some do it because they don't want to limit their reading audience.

 

By choosing a genre, you're not limiting your reading audience, you're identifying them. My suggestion is to dive deeper and select your sub-genre categories. The more specific you can get the more likely it is that you are going to be able to locate your readers and market to them more effectively.

 

One of my books falls under the following category, genres, and sub-genre: Teen and Young Adult -- Horror -- Science Fiction and Fantasy -- Science Fiction -- Post-Apocalyptic. Now, I have been contacted by many adult readers who've expressed that they enjoyed the book, so you may think that by putting the book in the Teen and Young Adult category that I am limiting my reach with a potential pool of readers. But in reality, there is a segment of adult readers that seek out Teen and Adult books. However, conversely, the segment of teen and young adult readers seeking out adult market books is much smaller. So, the smarter play here is to categorize it in the Teen and Young Adult market where I will reach a majority of interested readers.

 

Categories, genres, and subgenres, weren't invented by retailers to help them organize their titles. They were invented by publishers to help them market their books. Know your genre and you know your reader.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Bending genres

Find smaller markets to sell more books

5,360 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, promotion, genre, marketing_for_your_genre, genre_marketing
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Today's branding rule is a simple one. Not that any of the rules have been particularly complicated, but this one is perhaps the easiest concept to grasp. You are an author, which means your brand is tied to your work. Otherwise it wouldn't be an author brand, it would be a personal brand.


The rule of productivity says the more books you have on the market, the bigger your brand becomes. That's it. As long as you do what you're supposed to do as an author--publish books--your brand has a greater likelihood of being discovered and growing.


Can you publish one book and establish yourself as a brand? It's been done, yes. Before Go Set a Watchman was published in 2015, Harper Lee was a well-established author after her one and only previous offering, To Kill a Mockingbird, was published in 1960. And I'm sure there are other examples too. Some may be recent inductees into the "overnight success" categories, but the truth is Harper Lee represents the exception to the rule. Such a situation is rare.


The rest of us must commit to writing and publishing as many books as we have in us as quickly as we can. The larger our catalogs of books available for sale to the public, the more opportunities we have of being discovered and solidifying our author brands. So, here&'s the shorthand version of the rule of productivity: Write. Publish. Grow your brand. Repeat. Write. Publish...you get the point.


-Richard

 

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Power of Multiple Titles

 

You Have More Than One Book Inside of You

 

 

 

 

1,282 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, branding, author_brand, author_advice, author_identity
1

No one wants their authors to be all business. If you take to your virtual space and constantly post about your books or about the world of publishing as a whole, you are going to chase potential readers away.


Your author brand has to be multidimensional. I know it sounds counterintuitive, but you can&'t focus all your energy on your role as an author when branding yourself as an author. You are a commodity. It sounds simplistic, but it&'s true. There are millions of books available to buy. What sets your book immediately apart is you, the author. Yes, the issue of style and the quality of your writing and storytelling are crucial, but there is no denying that the author is often the draw.


So, as you build your platform, plan on devoting a good chunk of your online time to discussing and participating in topics outside of your books. Reviewing books in your genre, discussing hobbies, sharing stories about your passion projects outside of writing, these are all things you can focus on. You can even go totally astray and publish fluff pieces about your pets, family, friends, etc. Your options are unlimited.


The point is that you are more than an author. You are a human being who dabbles in real life as much as any respectable human being. The more adventurous you are, the greater the material you'll have at your disposal. So, get out there and jump at the opportunity to do something interesting, if for no other reason than it will beef up your author brand.


-Richard

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Building an Author Brand: You are What You Share

An Active Author Brand



1,304 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, writing, social_media, brand_identity, author_platform
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Your secret weapon

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 26, 2016

This is just a reminder. I wrote about this some time ago, but some of you may have missed this little gem of information. You have something you may not be aware that you have, something that can help you sell books, something that can help your writing career take off. All you have to do is take advantage of this tool that is at your disposal. You have a volunteer sales force.


     Your friends, family, followers, and fans are your volunteer sales force. They are ready, willing, and able to help you sell books if you do the following:


  1. Communicate with them on a regular basis. Let them know what new book you're working on, what events you have coming up on your schedule, what's the latest trend in your genre, etc. Keep them informed, so they can inform their friends, followers, and fans, thereby growing your volunteer sales force.
  2. Interact with them. Don't just feed them information about you and your career. Have conversations with them. Engage them and let them know that they are valuable members of your community.
  3. Manage them. Let them know you have sales goals and ask them for their feedback and help in achieving those sales goals. Give your volunteer sales force the authority to pitch your book to their inner circles and beyond.


Remember, you have a volunteer sales force. Do your job and write entertaining and engaging stories, and your volunteer sales force will have a product they believe in, and they will sell your book effortlessly.


-Richard


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Connect with Your Volunteer Sales Force

 

How to Manage Your Volunteer Sales Force

 

 

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

3,682 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: selling, author_brand, volunteers, sales_force, author_following, selling_more_books
1

Reader profiles

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Aug 24, 2016

You aren't just an author. You are a special agent, a very special agent. Your mission? Become a top-notch profiler. Who will you be profiling? Readers. The best way to reach your readers is to know who they are, and building a reader profile is the best way for you to know them.


    Here are the demographic categories that will help you in your profiling efforts:


  1. Age group: We are divided into groups based on common experiences. There is perhaps no greater cohesive grouping than those that are defined by age. People in the same general age range share a lot of cultural similarities, especially when it comes to music, movies, and literature. If you can clearly define your genre, you'll be able to fairly easily find the average age range of your readers.
  2. Gender: In the world of publishing, knowing the gender of your average reader can help you spend your marketing dollars more effectively. Certain genres appeal to one gender over another.
  3. Region: In some cases, what you write has geographic appeal. As an example, Southern thrillers will obviously have wider appeal below the Mason-Dixon Line. That's not to say it won't have fans that extend outside the region, but the greatest concentration of your readers will be Southerners.


You can parse the demographics down to even finer points. Hobbies, careers, politics, marital status--all of these are identifiers, and you can probably find information online that will help you build your reader profile. The more details you have, the narrower you can make your focus, and the better results you'll have with your reader outreach.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Marketing Maze

Mingle Marketing



1,225 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, promotion, readers, target_audience, marketing_research, marketing_appeal
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     You can promote your book without spending your life savings. Think locally. Design an ad that highlights both your book and its local author (you). Now find outlets around your community to promote your book. That's it. It's that simple. Okay, see you next blog post...I guess I could make a few suggestions on where to promote your book. Here are five businesses to approach about promoting your books:

 

  1. The Stage: Communities large and small have at least one playhouse that produces four to six shows a year. Each one of those shows has programs with bios for the cast and crew. They also sell ad space in those programs, and it's quite affordable.
  2. The Silver Screen: Find the nearest independent movie house and look for promotional opportunities. You may be able to create a slide for those pre-show images that cycle through on the screen, or you might even be able to hang a flyer/poster near the concession stand for a nominal fee.
  3. The Weekly: Metropolitan areas in particular have weekly alternative papers that offer advertising space at a reasonable rate
  4. The Coffee Shop: Independently owned coffee shops and/or bakeries may let you hang a flyer/poster in their establishment. If not free, the cost would most likely be negligible.
  5. The Farmers' Market: The Farmers' Market has become a staple of most communities these days. Horticulture artisans and craftsmen of every ilk set up tables and sell their wares. If you don't want to set up your own table to sell your book, perhaps individual vendors would rent out a corner of their tables for you to display your flyer/poster.

 

That should give you a head start in finding inexpensive local promotional opportunities. I'm sure you can think of even more on your own. Don't forget to share your marketing efforts on your social media accounts.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor

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Small marketing steps: alternative newspapers

Coffee and books

1,998 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, selling, self-publishing, promotion, marketing_strategy
1

A sense of urgency

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 25, 2016

Limited Time Offer!

 

Offer Expires Soon!

 

Sale Ends Tomorrow!

 

While Supplies Last!


The above are examples of ad copy we've all seen before. Other than the exclamation point, they all have one thing in common. It's the ad world's version of "show; don't tell." Each slogan conveys the same feeling, and it's a feeling meant to move consumers to run to their favorite shop, virtual or actual, and buy, buy, buy. That feeling is a sense of urgency.


It is meant to leave consumers feeling as if they are about to miss out on an incredible offer. It is either stated outright or implied that time is running out. The sweetheart deals will soon be gone and those who miss out will be left with nothing but a sense of regret.


As you devise a strategy to bring awareness to your book or books, look for a way to build a sense of urgency into your messaging. Perhaps it's reduced pricing for your book. What better way to use this urgency strategy. Highlight the limited time of the price reduction, and make it clear daily in your social media circle that the time is growing shorter to take advantage of the sale price.


Or perhaps you want to give away a dozen signed copies of your book. Don't think that the giveaway is enough to entice readers. The sense that the signed copies are limited editions and will be gone soon is the real promotion. Hammer that point home.


Sometimes to sell books, you have to have time on your side. The best way to do that is to limit the amount of time readers can participate in a promotion for your book. Make them feel as if they are about to miss out on an incredible opportunity.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Three marketing websites for authors

 

Guerrilla book marketing tactic

 

 

 

 

1,348 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, self-publishing, sales, promotions, social_media, how_to_promote
1

A fight--physical, verbal, passive-aggressive, actively aggressive--whatever the type or tools (words, fists, or other), usually involves a shot of adrenaline. Our personalities have a lot to do with determining how we express this surge in adrenaline, and thought plays a very small role in making the determination. We all tend to go on instinct. To engage in a fight, one feels wronged, and when one feels wronged, giving in to baser instincts is usually the result.


What does this have to do with authors and branding? Because I've seen too many authors act (or more accurately, react) in such a way to a perceived wrong that they run the very real risk of doing permanent damage to their brands. This "wrong" is in the form of a bad review. There are authors who will give in to temptation and respond directly to the reviewer. That never goes well, and I think we all know without question that is a bad move.


But, by far, the absolute worst thing you can do in response to a stinging review is rally the troops. I'm referring to going to your favorite social media venue and asking for your readers to counter the bad review with a positive one, or perhaps even more egregious, respond to the reviewer's less than flattering opinion. What follows are usually personal attacks that spill over into other virtual communities and escalate into tit-for-tat barbs that will all be associated with one person: the author.


The solution is obvious but extremely difficult to implement. The solution is to think. Don't engage your friends and followers to defend your honor. Good, bad, or indifferent, reviews are simply opinions. They aren't wrongs that can be corrected without a lot of collateral damage. They can be unfair, and they can be painful, but the only proper response to a bad review is no response. Rise above and avoid a potentially costly fray.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Bad Reviews Aren't So Bad

When Your Words Offend



1,022 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: selling, reviews, self-publishing, review, promotions, author_advice
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"You pick my next book." That was the note I saw from an author acquaintance of mine on Facebook. The author is prolific, sometimes cranking out seven books in a year, so part of me thought the idea factory was running low on material, if you know what I mean, but knowing this person's work ethic and publishing history for as long as I have, I quickly dismissed that. What this author was actually doing was using crowdsourcing to engage readers, and it's not a bad idea.


Other industries use crowdsourcing. The scientific community uses it to find solutions to difficult problems. Filmmakers use it to create online videos. The tech industry uses it uncover bugs in software. Note, I'm not talking about crowdfunding. There are no financial contributions made by the "crowd." The contributions in this case are intellectual in nature. They are of the idea variety.


What's the benefit of crowdsourcing a book idea? Engagement. You give your readers a stake in your next book, and by doing so you create a greater depth of loyalty to your author brand. You can crowdsource more than the idea. You can crowdsource your characters' names. You can crowdsource the setting. You can crowdsource virtually every element of story. The cool thing about it is, beyond being a great marketing strategy, it's an incredibly challenging creative endeavor. Think about it. You get to piece elements of story together given to you by your readers and craft a story that is all your own. Could there be anything more fun and rewarding?


-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Community Engagement Prompts

Marketing Tip: Ask Your Fans to Help Choose Your Cover

1,762 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: selling, self-publishing, promotion, promotions, funding, social_media, crowdsourcing, author_advice
1

 

Going offline and into the real world to market your book can be an expensive and risky proposition if you don't find the right venue. For example, I think you're making a big mistake by trying to get your book into a bookstore. More books is something they don't need, and you won't necessarily stand out. My advice is to find locally owned businesses that don't normally feature authors and their books. Here are three types of businesses I believe that will be open to featuring your book.


  1. Coffee Shops/Cafés: I've long been a proponent of approaching locally owned coffee shops about doing readings. It is as natural a fit as you will find in the world of books. But beyond coffee shops, cafés in general are also excellent establishments to approach about displaying a poster featuring your book or even setting up a consignment deal with them to sell your books. There's a small café down the street from my house that specializes in soups, and they feature artwork for sale by local artists. Why not authors?
  2. Theaters: I am a season ticket holder to three theaters in my area. Two of them have featured books for sale by local authors. One of those authors just happens to be me. How did I get my book in there? I asked. Simple as that.
  3. Independent Movie Houses: This may be unique to certain areas, but if you happen to live in a community with an old movie theater that's independently owned, you have a place that may be open to selling your book on consignment or at the very least allowing you to hang a poster or flyer. Independent movie houses are special places that usually show smaller budget films and attract older audiences. They're perfect places for an author to advertise a book.


Whatever types of businesses you approach, be prepared to provide them with support material. I suggest going beyond the flyer route and having a poster made up or even bookmarks they can hand out at the counter. If you want to set up a consignment deal, do your research before approaching them and know the industry standard and procedure for such an arrangement. The more professional you are the more likely they are to say yes.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Giving Books Away: A Strategy that Still Works

 

Finding Readers in Waiting Rooms

 

 

 

 

1,911 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, selling, book_marketing, promotions, marketing_ideas, author_tips, author_advice
3

I am going to make a claim that will undoubtedly make a lot of folks groan and roll their eyes. I speak from personal observation, and I'm willing to concede that my conclusion is not universal in nature. In other words, I may just be really weird.

 

Like many of you, I get marketing emails all the time. They come from all sorts of organizations and individuals. I ignore 99 percent of them. I've been conditioned to do so. The one percent I don't ignore come from an e-tailer that sends me about three to four emails a day. I see their name under the "From" column over and over again. The name of the company takes a subliminal hold in my subconscious. Even if I don't actively follow the links in the emails they provide, they are definitely my go-to resource for online shopping.

 

On the flip side, I am on a couple of email lists for authors. I get emails from them at most once a month. Given the volume of marketing emails I get, these messages from authors announcing a new book or some other development go unnoticed. Beyond missing the content of the email, the subliminal effect of seeing the sender's name on a continuous stream of emails is also absent.

 

My point is that email marketing works, but not if you use it infrequently. In a supposition that admittedly defies what we've been taught, I believe email marketing works when it floods into your inbox. Some call it spam. Some call it junk mail, but it works on the premise that has served the advertising industry well for as long as there has been an advertising industry. Repetition is the key to creating top-of-mind awareness and increasing sales.

 

You may agree or disagree, and I'm not advocating using such a strategy, but I am curious to know how you use or view email marketing.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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A Marketing Calendar

Competency

1,998 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, selling, self-publishing, promotion, social_media, email_marketing
3

So, this isn't the first time I've floated this idea out there, but it's something I like to touch on from time to time to remind indie authors what an author brand really is. Using the word brand suggests that there's an artificial construct involved. That you as an author are being directed to create a persona that you think meets readers' expectations.

 

Every time I get into this discussion with people I'm reminded of a scene from the classic television show Seinfeld. When Jerry and George are pitching a show to the television network executives, they're asked what it's about, and George excitedly proclaims that it&'s about nothing. The network executive is confused because it can't be about nothing. It has to be about something, but George insists that it's not. Jerry interjects that even nothing is something.

 

That exchange encapsulates what an author brand is. It's nothing. That is to say it's nothing false. It is you. It is your interests, your opinions, and your personality. It is everything you love. It can even be everything that drives you crazy. Wherever your passions lie, that's your brand. There is nothing to do to build a brand other than to be yourself, genuinely, fervently, and openly.

 

Building and maintaining an author brand is, at its core, you being honest about who you really are. If you are, your brand will thrive and help grow your community. It won't happen overnight, but it will happen as long as you stay committed to that principle. In turn, your community will help grow your readership.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Evaluating Your Author Brand

Building an Author Brand is Easy

6,239 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, branding, author_brand, marketing_ideas, author_tips, author_advice
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Are you missing an untapped revenue stream? Classrooms and books go together like toast and butter. Your book could be a perfect fit for a classroom environment. It doesn't even necessarily have to be a book for young adults. There are countless opportunities to reach students of all ages and backgrounds, and you increase your chances of reaching such a market by doing one thing: creating a teacher's guide for your book.

 

Here is what to include in a teacher's guide should you choose to tap into the classroom market:

  1. One sentence description: This should explain the main conflict of the book.

  2. Short but detailed summary of the book: Write it in present tense and use adjectives sparingly. This is a cut-and-dried summary that covers plot and sub-plots from beginning to end.

  3. Detailed character descriptions: Include your secondary characters.

  4. Summaries for each chapter: Include questions for classroom discussions.

  5. Author interview: Create 10 questions that you think are relevant to the book and offer engaging responses.

 

There are two options you can pursue with the teacher's guide: you can offer it in print-on-demand and eBook formats and make it available for sale, or you can create a PDF that can be downloaded from your website for free. The first option provides you a new direct stream of revenue. The second option can be a loss leader that could lead to more sales of the book overall. Either method gives you the opportunity to reach more readers and make more money.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

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The Reader's Guide

Building an Author Brand: Networking

1,570 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, selling, pdf, distribution, author, writing, promotions, classroom, marketing_ideas, teacher's_guide
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I have a book that will be released in July of 2016, and it's a bit of a different experience for me than my previous publishing adventures because I have no immediate plans to release it in print. Long story short, this is a team project, and I don't have the final say on the format. Hopefully, I can expand it into print, but for now, I have to think strictly eBook.

 

That is a bit of a mind shift for me. For a number of years, I have been doing releases in both eBook and print formats. The print copies have always been an easy marketing tool for me. I could take a number of copies with me to appearances or events and devise giveaways to boost enthusiasm for a new release. Online marketing is great, but the personal appearance is still king when it comes to connecting with readers.

 

I have committed to doing a book launch for this new eBook release that involves a personal appearance, and it has presented me with a bit of a puzzle. How do I get people excited at an appearance when I won't have a book to appear with?

 

At a recent workshop for playwrights, as I watched staged readings of other writers' work, it hit me. I don't need the book. I just need the story. I went home and hammered out a plan for an appearance that involves short dramatic readings of chapters using local actors. I will involve other writers I know to adapt and direct the material for these staged readings. I'll incorporate door prizes that fit the theme of the book for the audience. I'll make it an invitation-only intimate affair with a number of nonprofessional social media savvy friends in attendance. I have to say it is the first of my appearances that will be more about the people attending and performing than it will be about me, and I'm so excited by that. They will take ownership of my story, and the marketing of the eBook. My hope is that it will translate into a frontloaded wave of word-of-mouth buzz that will grow over time.

 

Don't ditch the personal appearance if you're planning an eBook-only release. Find a way to get attendees at the event engaged and enthusiastic, so they will spread the word via their social media platforms.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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How to Make a Personal Appearance a Success

How to Make an Author Event Eventful

2,014 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, book, print, kindle, ebook, craft, online_marketing, book_launch, book_launch_party
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