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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Reach New Readers with the Magic of Audiobooks - The Creative Penn

The audio version of your book can open up a whole new market for you.

                                                    

Ether for Authors: Could Beta Readers Ease the Impatience? -Publishing Perspectives

Could you workshop your manuscript with actual readers?

 

Film

                                                        

What Is Your Movie Competition - Filmmaking Stuff

When developing a business plan, a crucial step is identifying your competition. Do filmmakers have competition?

                                          

Why the One Second Film Was an Absolute Victory for Filmmakers -The Film Industry Network

A crowdsourcing case study that predates most social media sites.     

                                    

Music

 

Creating Great Melodies - Getting There

It all starts with finding the right melody.

 

How to Borrow A Little Songwriting Power from Bob Dylan -Promote Your Music

The answer you've been looking for is in the melody.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - June 21, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - June 14, 2013

1,751 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self-publishing, movies, writers, readers, films, draft, craft, songwriting, social_media, audiobooks, music_production, movie_competition
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The Unlikely Best-Seller: 'A Wrinkle In Time' Turns 50 -NPR

 

The experts don't always know best. This story proves excellent writing lets you break the "rules" sometimes.

 

The Average Book Has 64,500 Words -PWxyz

 

Ever wonder if your word count measures up to the classics? Wonder no more.

 

Film

 

Write What You (Don't) Know -a MOON Brothers film

 

Here's a counterpoint to the old axiom in every writer's head. To put it simply, if you can imagine it, you can write it.


The Power of "Don't Wait": Funding Lessons from Independent Filmmakers - Online News Association

 

Lam Thuy V investigates how so many filmmakers seem to be able to produce long-form documentary films.

 

Music

 

Songwriting 101: Thomas Hutchings -Riffraf

 

Saxophonist/producer Thomas Hutchings discusses his creative process.

 

Using Content Marketing to Energize Your Music Fan Funnel - Frying in Vein

 

Are you power pathing? Read this post by Hubert Sawyers III to find out what power pathing is all about.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - March 9, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - March 2, 2012

1,394 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, marketing, marketing, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, film, film, songwriting, songwriting
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Confluence of Pleasures: On Reading and Tuna Fish - The Millions

An essay about those moments when the right book finds you at the right time.     

 

Nonlinear Reading and Other Things Print Books Do Better Than E-books - PWxyz

Is this a case where the "analog" world outdoes the digital world when it comes to nonlinear "technology"?   

 

Film

 

The (Dreaded) Silent Role - A MOON Brothers film

Actors who pass on parts because of lack of dialogue may be missing out on the chance to deliver an Oscar-winning performance.              

 

Beyond a Social Network - The Independent

Yet another article about the changing face of film financing and the world of crowdsourcing.   

 

Music

 

Is the Dedicated Songwriter Going Extinct? - digital music news

The music industry is seeing the demise of songwriting as a reliable source of income. Now, songwriters are being asked to diversify in order to make a living.  

 

6 Things to Help Your Music Marketing This Week - Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

Get your notebooks out. Bob Baker is cranking out the free marketing tips.     

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 26, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 19, 2011 Edition

1,312 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, book, book, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, reading, reading, acting, acting, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, songwriting, songwriting, social_media, social_media, crowdsourcing, crowdsourcing
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The Final Chapter

 

We've all been there. You fall in love with a book as you're reading it. It may even seem less like a book and more like an event. This book is your new favorite. You can't wait to tell your friends and family about the book, and then...you get to the last chapter and it falls completely apart. It seems to happen more frequently with books that cover social issues. The set-up is insightful, but the solution chapter doesn't hit the mark.

 

The weakness of last chapters is in large part a function of the sheer difficulty of devising answers to complex social problems that are sound, practicable and not blindingly obvious. Besides, those who give the most subtle diagnoses may not have the problem-solving disposition needed to come up with concrete, practical recommendations.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Why Last Chapters Disappoint

 

The Informed Audience

 

There was a day when filmmakers created a film and showed it to an audience that had no clue how movies were made. They didn't know the work that was involved. They didn't know the commitment it requires to take a movie from script to screen. They didn't appreciate the process behind making a film. Those days are gone.

 

While some see audience as the faceless mass waiting to be entertained or reduced to eyeballs needing to be captured, (Jay) Rosen points out that audiences now have the means and ability to make their own work...more people will have a newfound respect for those with talent (it isn't easy to create content worthy of an audience) and a network of creators can be harnessed to spread work much further than an expensive ad campaign can do.

 

You can read the entire article on ACTORSandCREW's website: Who Wants To Understand the Power of Little Networks?

 

All They Need is Love?

 

The Beatles were a legendary band because they got along so well, right? They created brilliant songs out of their utter love for each other, right? The music came from their heart, and their hearts were always working in concert to craft historical pop songs...right? Not really. According to a new book by authors Richard Courtney and George Cassidy, at least some of their collaboration was born out of strife.

 

THE Beatles were stymied. During a 1968 recording session, they couldn't find a suitable introduction to "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da," a song written by Paul McCartney. John Lennon didn't much like the song, and, after several hours, he stormed out of the studio. When he returned, he strode to the piano and banged out several chords, then added petulantly, "Here's your intro!" "All eyes shifted to Paul, expecting rejection, perhaps an outburst," according to a new book, "Come Together: The Business Wisdom of The Beatles." (Turner Publishing, $24.95). Instead, McCartney defused the tension with this: "That's quite good, actually." Lennon's chords, pounded out in a fit of pique, make up the song's now-famous opening.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Whisper Words of Business Wisdom

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 25, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 18, 2011

1,230 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, music, music, chapter, chapter, filmmakers, filmmakers, songwriting, songwriting, audience, audience
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It's Never Too Late to Keep a Promise or Write That Book

 

Be careful of those promises you make. Gone unfulfilled, they could haunt you for years - decades even. Take one Barnaby Conrad. He promised his old boss, mentor and friend, Sinclair Lewis, that he would indeed finish his tome on John Wilkes Booth. Shortly after making the promise, Lewis died and Conrad let the years slip away without finishing the book. Fast forward 60 years, and Conrad fulfilled his promise.  What prompted him to finish?

 

What moved him was his son Barnaby Conrad III, a writer and magazine editor who in 2009 had joined Council Oak Books and was hunting for new acquisitions; a year later, 59 years after Lewis died, he signed his father for an advance of $5,000. "I basically lit a fire under him again," the younger Mr. Conrad said.

 

You can read the entire article on the New York Times' website: After 60 Years, a Promise Kept to Sinclair Lewis

 

Looking Into a Mirror with Another Mirror

 

There are those who have a problem with product placements in films and there are those who embrace it. Morgan Spurlock has created a documentary examining the practice of product placement and branding, and he funded the film with product placements in his film. In a practice of pure irony, Spurlock found companies that paid him to let him scrutinize how they package their brands.

 

So when business people decide to let documentary makers inside their well-fortified doors, exactly what do they hope to get out of it? Do they think they can charm them? Outwit them? Or maybe these buttoned-up corporate types just crave a star turn? Pat Aufderheide, director of the Center for Social Media, says she thinks that some companies that choose to participate do so because of a keep-your-enemies-closer strategy. "If they're not there, it looks like an admission of guilt," she said. "And at least if they show up they have a chance to get their side of the story - their spin - across."

 

You can read the entire article on the New York Times' website: Product Placement, Turned Inside Out

 

Writing Music Old-school Style

 

There are no shortcuts worth taking in a creative business. While some seek fame and fortune by chasing down record executives and singing in contests, Anthony D'Amato chased down a professor at Princeton and handed him a demo CD. Why? Because this particular professor was Paul Muldoon, a renowned poet. D'Amato wanted to fine-tune his songwriting skills by learning from a master wordsmith.

 

"I wanted to get better, and I knew he was somebody who could help me get better," Mr. D'Amato, 23, said, sitting with Professor Muldoon recently in his office. Professor Muldoon, 55, won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 2003, and he is chairman of the Peter B. Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton. Starting in 2009, Mr. D'Amato, then a Princeton junior, met with Professor Muldoon every few weeks to pore over drafts of Mr. D'Amato's songs, which he started writing as a high school student at Blair Academy in Blairstown.

 

You can read the entire article on the New York Times' website: Aspiring Singer Finds Mentors Behind Ivy League Walls

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - January 28, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - January 21, 2011

1,310 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, book, book, music, music, documentary, documentary, news, news, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, branding, branding, songwriting, songwriting
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Is This the Year of the E-book?


The day that many have predicted may be here. E-books outsold print books the week after the holidays on USA Today's top-50 list. Sure it was only a week, but it's a pretty significant development. Like it or not, e-books are growing in popularity and the trend does not appear to be stalling anytime soon.


USA TODAY's Best-Selling Books list, to be published Thursday, will show digital's new popularity: E-book versions of the top six books outsold the print versions last week. And of the top 50, 19 had higher e-book than print sales. It's the first time the top-50 list has had more than two titles in which the e-version outsold print. "Lots of consumers woke up Christmas morning with new e-reading devices ready to load them up with e-books," says Paul Bogaards of Knopf, American publisher for Stieg Larsson's Millennium trilogy, which holds three of the top four spots on the list.


You can read the entire article on USA Today's website: Week after holidays, e-book sales outdo print


Did Lucas Unnecessarily Air His Back Story?

There is no doubt that George Lucas is a filmmaking genius, and I get a little uncomfortable being overly critical of his choice to create the three prequel movies to his Star Wars empire (that's empire with a lowercase "e"). But let's face it: the first three films were groundbreaking in scope and structure. They changed film. The prequels did not. So, what was different? Why didn't they have the same impact? The Moon brothers' assessment is that the prequels were just a bunch of unnecessary back story.   


The problem that the prequels had, especially for those who were around when the original trilogy came out, is this: Our imagination is so strong, usually it's hard to top. We put together the clues to form the full backstory in our minds. Put the two trilogies back-to-back, and you'll find that there are little inconsistencies. Backstory and story don't quite match, especially regarding the reasons and circumstances surrounding the turn of Anakin Skywalker to the dark side.


You can read the entire article on the Moon Brothers website: The Backstory of Star Wars


Is Simple the Key to Success in Songwriting?

It is human nature to lament the state of popular music. My generation does it. The generation before me does it. Cavemen did it when a three syllable grunt was something you could dance to. Someone is always unhappy about the current crop of songs getting the most attention. Jon Pareles of the New York Times is the latest to hate the string of songs played over and over again in various venues. 


The pressures on musicians to keep things simple are obvious. What have become all-too-familiar 21st-century refrains - too much information, too little time and the diminished attention spans that result from trying to cope - have only grown more insistent through the decade. The recording technology of loops and samples encourages unimaginative producers to repeat something merely adequate for the length of a song rather than developing or enriching it. 


You can read the entire article on the New York Times' website: Want a Hit? Keep It Simple


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - January 7, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - December 31, 2010

1,459 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, movies, movies, ebooks, ebooks, songwriting, songwriting
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


How to Write a Book to Build Your Personal Brand - Author Thought Leadership

We live in the age of the personal brand. If you're an expert in something, you can boost your brand and business with a book.

 

 

Why I Stopped Reading Your Blog - Michael Hyatt

Michael Hyatt shares his tips and tricks on how to keep your readers coming back over and over again to your blog.

 

 

Film


Being Invisible With Green Screen Film Making - EzineMark

If you have a green screen, there is almost nothing you can't do on film or video.


 

Ten Filmmaking Trends for 2011 - Filmmaking Central

Are you ready to go mainstream? Get ready for small productions to be big this year.


 

 

Music


 

'No Pain, No Gain' in Life - and Songwriting - Music after 50

Songwriter Ellen Blum Barish learns that inspiration often comes from a broken heart.


 

Flute Made on a 3D Printer - SynthGear

I dare you to watch this and not be amazed. Just think: you may be able to make your own musical instruments from your house in the very near future.


-Richard
Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - January 4, 2011 Edition
Tuesday's Blog Roundup - December 28, 2010 Edition

1,325 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: filmmaking, filmmaking, writers, writers, writing, writing, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, songwriting, songwriting, social_media, social_media
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As an artist, I suffer from an emotion called doubt. From time to time, I doubt my talent. I doubt my chances of success. I even doubt my right to call myself an artist. I suppose it comes with the territory, and I have always been able to work through it, but I have talked to a lot of writers who are so filled with doubt that it cripples their confidence to the point that they can't write. If you find yourself wresting with doubt, here is the secret to free yourself from its evil clutches. You are the creator of your own doubt.

 

I mean that literally. Doubt is an emotion. Emotions are small-chain proteins called peptides. Peptides are created in the part of the brain called the hypothalamus. When I doubt myself, my hypothalamus goes to work creating the proper peptides and sends them out to interact with the cells of my body. My stress levels go up and my energy level goes down. The initial source of the doubt may have come from an external source, but the doubt itself is produced by me.

 

Why does knowing this help me? Because if I can manufacture doubt, then logic dictates I can manufacture confidence, too. With a thought, I can flip a switch in my hypothalamus and start producing the confidence peptides. They will interact with my cells. My stress levels will fall, and I will be full of energy. I don't need an external source to build my confidence. I have the tool (my hypothalamus) to create the small-chain proteins that will squelch the doubt.

 

The trick is to find that thought that will trigger the production of the confidence peptides in your hypothalamus. Strangely enough for me, that thought is an understanding that most of the great artists I admire struggled to make it. They went through periods of self-doubt, as well. What made them great was that they chose to manufacture confidence over doubt.

 

So, the choice is yours and no one else's. What kind of small-chain protein will you produce?

 

CreateSpaceRichard

Richard is an employee of CreateSpace and an award-winning author.

1,679 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, self-publishing, artists, publishing, writing, films, songs, musicians, screenwriting, filmmakers, songwriting