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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Why the Writing Journey Is Just Like Skiing - The Creative Penn

It's time to get off the bunny slopes. 

                           

How to Sell More Books to the Right Target Audience - The Future of Ink

When you're trying to find a target audience, picture one ideal reader.      

 

Film

                                                        

Filmmaking in Virtual Reality - Digital Production ME

Is virtual gaming the future of filmmaking?    

                                          

Filmmaking As Your Small Business - Filmmaking Stuff

How hard is it to turn your film into a small business?  

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

How to Maintain a Guitar - Guitar Lessons and Equipment

If your guitar isn't kept in a hard case, chances are it needs some maintenance.

 

Filter It Out! - Audio Fanzine

Do you know your subtractive synthesis?   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - December 5, 2014

Weekly News Roundup - November 28, 2014

1,602 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, music, filmmaking, movies, writers, readers, publishing, writing, films, promotions, musicians, filmmakers, social_media, target_audience, filmmaking_tips
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We indie authors are a spoiled bunch. We are free to write and publish anything we want. Traditionally published authors are blocked from such freedoms. They are restricted in a lot of ways that don't apply to our freewheeling publishing lifestyle, including when their book is published. A lot of indie writers publish as soon as the final draft is done. Some authors follow a book release schedule. So which is the best approach?

 

I'm of the opinion that setting up a release schedule is the optimum strategy since there are constraints that no longer exist in today's publishing world. More than anything, scheduling allows you to plan for a release. You can get the word out in advance and build momentum heading into the release date.

 

 

Here are two things to consider as you create your release schedule:

 

  1. Pay attention to the seasons. Book sales tend to be slightly better in the winter and fall than in the spring and summer. That's not to say you should never release a book in the spring and summer. If you have a story with a spring and/or summer theme, you should take advantage of the tie-in.

  2. Speaking of tie-ins, if your book's theme centers on a holiday or an event, you should schedule your release to coincide with that holiday or event. A tie-in release provides a lot of natural marketing opportunities.

 

As indie authors we have unprecedented freedom when it comes to release of our books.  But, this is a business. You are better served if you plan a release using the methodology of your choice in order to maximize the impact on initial sales. 

-Richard                                                  

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Book Launch Sponsors

The Launch Party

2,355 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: selling, promotion, writing, book_marketing, promotions, launch, craft, branding, book_launch, book_release, _
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Lie vs. Lay

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 9, 2014

I recently started taking a crazy fitness class at my gym. I like the instructor, but I secretly think he may be trying to kill us! I spend most of the class praying for it to be over, keeping one eye on the clock while trying not to fall off the medicine ball, or out of my plank, or messing up some equally torturous position.

 

When the time to catch our breath and stretch finally comes, I'm always thrilled. However, I often have a hard time relaxing right away because the instructor makes the same error every class: He says "Lay down on your backs," and it makes me cringe. (My yoga instructors often make this same mistake.)

 

Im not going point out my instructors error to him because hes not a writer. But I know this one can be confusing even for writers, so I thought it was worth explaining in my blog:

 

You LAY something else down. You LIE yourself down.

 

In the present tense, here are some examples:

 

Correct: I lay the fork next to my plate.

Correct: We lie down on our backs at the end of class and rest.

Correct: To end this war we must lay down our arms.

Correct: If we lie down and stay still, maybe they wont see us.

In the past tense, things get a little tricky. You LAID something else down. You LAY yourself down.

 

Correct: I laid the fork next to my plate.

Correct: We lay down on our backs at the end of class and rested.

Correct: To end the war we laid down our arms.

Correct: We lay down and stayed still, hoping they wouldnt see us.

 

In the present perfect and past perfect tenses, you HAVE LAID or HAD LAID something else down. You HAVE LAIN or HAD LAIN yourself down.

 

Correct: I have often laid the fork next to my plate.

Correct: We have lain down and rested on our backs at the end of every class.

Correct: To end the war we had laid down our arms.

Correct: We had lain down and remained still, hoping they wouldnt see us.

 

Im not going to lie; this can be a little confusing! But like all grammar, its also important. So lay down your pen and think about it before you put anything in ink.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Grammar Tip: She and I, Not Her and I

Grammar Tip: Don't Overcapitalize

2,155 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: author, writers, writing, craft, writing_advice, grammar_tip, grammar_advice
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I had the occasion to discuss change with a group of people this past week. Not good change, but unexpected turmoil. I was the only writer in the group, and as I listened to everybody talk about the unwanted moments they've dealt with, I framed it the only way I know how. I put it into the context of writing a book.

 

Writers count on change. We have a kind of strange faith in it. We write a first draft knowing that change is inevitable. To us, the concept of change isn't a scary thing. At least it shouldn't be. Rewrites are opportunities to make things better, to improve our story.

 

The folks in the room hated going through the changes they were faced with, but ultimately they adjusted and found a new perspective that made them happy. That's the same thing we do during rewrites. We take material that we may be excited about, only to come to realize changes need to be made. We adapt and gain a new perspective. These bumps in the road that we experience when writing a book (and even in life) simply need reframing in order to be seen for what they really are: an opportunity to improve.

 

Last night, I talked to a writer after a writing workshop in which material was read and critiqued by the other members of the group. It's a terrifying thing to go through. This writer admitted to me that she didn't take the feedback very well the first time she participated in the workshop. She took all the criticism personally, but when she got home and looked at the material, she realized the changes people had recommended really did make the story better.

 

Don't fear the bad breaks in writing or in life. They are opportunities for you to gain a new perspective that will make your life better.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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It's Never Too Early to Get a Little Help from Your Friends

Be Open to Constructive Criticism

1,892 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, revisions, writing
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Who doesn't love receiving a gift in the mail? I certainly do! And book lovers do too. Now that the holidays are approaching, why not put together a list of target readers for your work and send them a signed copy to curl up with on the couch? You never know what it might lead to.

 

I've mentioned in this bloghow I once conducted a successful holiday marketing campaign that targeted presidents of my sorority at 15 major universities across the Unites States. I did so because they represented my target audience. Who is your target audience? I can't answer that for you, but you must have an idea. Is it hiking enthusiasts? Wine lovers? Adventure travelers? Divorced moms? NBA fans? World War II buffs? Dog people?

 

The Internet makes it relatively easy to find anyone these days, so if you're willing to put in the time and energy, you should be able to put together a list without too much trouble. (I'm not talking about home addresses; I'm thinking associations, clubs, institutions, etc., many of which list their officers online.)

 

Once you have the list, here are some helpful tips:

 

  • Include a personalized letter with each signed book so the reader can contact you if he/she enjoys it. If you have a Facebook page, newsletter, Twitter account, etc., you can also include this information.
  • Include your e-mail address beneath your signature in the book.
  • Request the "book rate" at the post office - this will keep your mailing costs down.
  • Follow up! Even if you don't hear from the readers, there's nothing stopping you from reaching out after the holidays. If you don't have an e-mail address, try sending a friendly postcard.

 

If you have absolutely no idea who your target reader is, head to a local mall and pass out some books to people you think might want to read it. Then ask yourself why you chose those people, and how you think they might spend their time when they're not at the mall. Once you know the answer to those questions, head home and start building your list. You can do it!

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Marketing Idea: Set Up a Card Table on the Sidewalk

 

Tips for Networking with Other Authors

2,021 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, promotions, holiday_marketing
3

What time during the day do you write? If you had asked me early in my writing journey, I'd have answered, "Whenever I can find free time." But as writing became a passion I wanted to turn into a career, I came up with a set time to write. Since I was a cubicle-jockey through most of my corporate life, evenings were writing time. When I took the leap and left the corporate world, I switched to the mornings. And I was more productive, initially.

 

Studies have shown that our prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain where we develop complex cognitive behavior, is more active directly after sleeping. That makes perfect sense. Simple deduction will tell you that this part of the brain that cranks out all those creative juices is more efficiently used for writing during those first few hours immediately after waking from a good night's sleep.

 

Here's the slight hiccup for me. In my case, I have found that routine creates staleness. I will get stuck in the proverbial rut. I believe challenging the brain is a more effective tool for creativity than having a set time to write. Recently, I had a string of days when my schedule wouldn't allow me to write in the mornings. I found myself tapping away in the evenings, even into the a.m. hours. And this was honest-to-goodness "in the zone" writing. When you experience that type of writing, you realize you haven't had that feeling in a while.

 

So, for me it turns out a set time to write is less important. How about you? What is your writing schedule like?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Distraction Fast

How to Write without a Plan

2,606 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, creativity
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Weekly News Roundup - November 28, 2014

 

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Do Writers Have to "Write What They Know?" - Backspace

Is it "write what you know" or "write what you're passionate about"?

                           

How to Build a Fictional World - TED Ed

Author Kate Messner reveals a few tricks of the trade to bring fictional worlds to life.      

 

Film

                                                        

Structures - Projector Films

Learn about the '5-act Pixar poker idea' in this podcast.    

                                          

Filmmakers Risk Everything by Doing These 7 Things - Film Industry Network

What risks are you taking?  

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

"Is It Realistic at My Age, to Think I Can Ever Really Become a Respectable Sax Player?" - Sax Station

Is there such a thing as being too old to pursue your musical dreams?

 

Is How You Label Yourself As a Singer Holding You Back? - From the Front of the Choir

If you call yourself a soprano, you may not realize you can sing in the alto range.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- November 14, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- November 21, 2014

1,622 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, music, filmmaking, author, self-publishing, indie, publishing, writing, fiction, writing_fiction, films, musicians, filmmakers, music_business, writing_tips, film_editing, music_industry, filmmaking_tips, music_advice
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The Pitch Test

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 26, 2014

Okay, you've published a book or two or three or four, and you are itching to get on to your next masterpiece. The problem is you don't have any idea what that next masterpiece should be. Or you might have so many ideas you don't know which one should be your next project.

 

Here's a strategy. This will work great if you are in the category of "too many ideas."If you have no idea, it will take a little more effort, but a sculpture starts out as an uncut stone until a sculptor starts chipping away. That's all you're doing here.

 

  1. Get five sheets a paper. On each piece of paper, hammer out a rough plot for a story. It should be a sloppy mess. Words will be crossed out. You'll have scribbles in the margins. You'll likely be disgusted by your lack of creative flow during the process. That's what I want. I want you to get angry at each piece of paper.

  2. Get five more sheets of paper. Each new piece of paper corresponds with the plot ideas you just killed yourself to create. Write three things you like about the plot, and write three things you hate about the plot. Force yourself to come up with three items for each category. You may notice something you overlooked the first time.

  3. Get one sheet of paper. Based on your likes and dislikes lists, rank your plot ideas.

  4. Get another sheet of paper. Write a one-sentence pitch for your top three plot ideas.

  5. Get yet another sheet of paper. Rank these three pitches in order of ease that it took to create them.  

 

If you go through all of that to find a story that's easy for you to describe in one sentence, you have found your next masterpiece. You know that story inside and out. It has taken root in your fertile imagination. If it passes the pitch test, it's worth writing.

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

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Unfinished and Happy

How to Write without a Plan

3,995 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, author, writers, writing, writing_process, writer's_block, writing_tips, writing_advice
3

Last year, an old friend called me out of the blue. It had been ages since we'd talked, so I was thrilled to hear from him. He said he'd decided to write a novel and wanted to bounce the premise off me. Knowing how funny this guy is, I couldn't wait to hear his idea - and I wasn't disappointed. What he had in mind was hilarious. I told him as much, wished him the best, and said to keep me posted.

 

I emailed him on his birthday a couple months ago and asked how the novel was going. He said he'd written a couple chapters but had gotten sidetracked by other things, so it never really got off the ground. Needless to say, I was disappointed. But I wasn't surprised.

 

When it comes to writing a book, there's a huge difference between getting motivated and staying motivated. Crafting a novel is not something you can power through in an afternoon, like going for a run, or cleaning out the garage. It takes diligence and commitment, and a lot of hard work. But as we all know, it can be done.

 

How do I stay motivated when I'm working on a book? I set a daily quota for how many words I'm going to write (usually 1,000), and I don't go to bed until I've reached it. (I don't use weekly word targets because that only invites day-seven procrastination.) Some authors write every single day, whereas I write Monday through Friday. The key is to choose a schedule that works for you, then stick to it. If you respond well to rewards, then do something nice for yourself at the end of each week.

 

Quota and reward systems aside, when it comes to self-motivation, the term speaks for itself, i.e., it's entirely up to you. Just like no one is ever going to force you to run a marathon or hike the Inca Trail, no one is ever going to force you to write a book. As for my friend, for now it's just not that high on his list—and may never be. And that is completely fine! If it's high on your list, however, then do it. You won't regret it. I promise.

  

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Productivity vs. Perfection

Writing Takes Discipline

5,457 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, writers, writing, advice, motivation, craft, branding, writing_tips, writing_advice
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

What I Wish Someone Had Taught Me about Marketing before I Published My First Book - Michael Hyatt

Don't leave the marketing to somebody else.

                           

How to Write Faster, Better and Love What You Do - The Publishing Profits Podcast Show

Bestselling author Rachel Aaron gives her secrets for increasing output without sacrificing quality.      

 

Film

                                                        

Seven Things to Consider before Launching Your Web Series - Indiewire

Critical key ingredients for your web series.    

                                          

The 7 Filmmaking Blogs You Should Be Reading & Bookmarking Today - Noam Kroll

Filmmaker Noam Kroll identifies his favorite blogs dedicated to the craft of filmmaking.  

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Five Steps for Successfully Crowdfunding a Gig - Musicgoat.com

There are now crowdfunding sites for bands to raise money for gigs.

 

Ten Electronic Music Production Techniques and Strategies to Improve Your Sound - Renegade Producer

How to make your mixes sound more professional.  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- November 14, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- November 7, 2014

1,746 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, music, website, filmmaking, self-publishing, promotion, writers, first_book, writing, book_marketing, musicians, writing_tips, music_production
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How long should my novel be? That's a question I hear quite a bit from new writers. They have experience as readers, but the only thing they can accurately gauge is the page count as it applies to the length of a book. We know as writers that word count is the unit of measure with which we should concern ourselves. That being said, what is the proper word count for a book that is made available for sale to the public?

 

Well, of course there is no law that dictates book length. What is and isn?t palatable by the reading public is subjective. But the expectations set by the book industry years ago are a good rule of thumb to follow today. I compared the numbers on three sites that addressed this matter and came up with general word counts for the following genres.

 

  • Middle Grade: 25,000 to 40,000

  • Young Adult Fiction (YA): 50,000 to 80,000

  • New Adult Fiction: 60,000 to 85,000

  • Romance: 60,000 to 100,000

  • Literary Fiction: 80,000 to 110,000

  • Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense: 70,000 to 90,000

  • Fantasy/Science Fiction: 90,000 to 125,000

  • Horror: 80,000 to 100,000

  • Nonfiction: 70,000 to 110,000

 

It?s important to note that these numbers represent what the industry normally looks for from debut authors ? in other words, authors who don?t have established brands. Authors with a large following can and do break the word count expectations in whatever genre they specialize in. These numbers are simply to be used as a general guideline for new authors.

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

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Picking a Final Word Count Before You Write

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 2: Genre, Word Count, Finding a Reader, Announcing Intentions

4,771 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, book, author, writing, genre, word_count, writing_tips, industry_standards, wirting_advice
6

The other day, I received a notification that I had a new subscriber to my monthly newsletter. As I always do, I emailed her to ask why she'd signed up. She replied that while she hasn't yet written anything, she has a lot of stories she wants to share when she retires from her job as a police detective, so she thought she could learn from me.

 

Isn't that COOL? (Not the learning from me part, the police detective part!)

 

Just think of all the interesting material this woman could draw from when she finally has time to sit down and focus. My advice to her now? Keep track of her ideas.

 

I don't write crime books, but my novels do include many things that I've experienced in real life. In fact, I get lots of emails from readers telling me they enjoy the realism in my stories. To help keep that going, when I come across something I might want to include in a book, I do my best to make note of it immediately.

 

Here's an example: At my soccer game, one of my teammates admitted that he needs to get in better shape. He said he does a lot of "supported squats" at work, but that strategy clearly isn't working. I laughed out loud and immediately sent myself a text message to add his joke to my "TO USE IN A BOOK" document.

 

If you can still recall the name of your elementary school vice principal, more power to you. If you're like those of us with a less-than-stellar memory, I suggest keeping track of your ideas. Whether it's for an entire book, a scene within a book, or just a funny comment like the one my friend made, make a note of it. You may never use it, but then again, maybe you will.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Embracing Inspiration from Real-Life Moments

When You Cut a Scene You Like, Save It!

6,252 Views 6 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, book_ideas
0

A while back, I talked about being invited to a book launch for an indie debut novelist. She had put together a team and organized a fairly elaborate party in a high-priced venue. I was both happy for her and initially a little leery of her strategy. However, after taking some time to reflect, I decided I was excited she had made such a bold move. Book launches are a big deal. If you have the funds to throw a big party, throw a big party.

 

I have since attended the book launch. It was even more elaborate than I had thought. She went all out. There were more than 100 people in attendance, including friends, friends of friends, and members of the media. There was a cash bar and food, and she did a book signing near the entrance of the venue. In the back of the venue was a ballroom with a stage. Shortly after I arrived, five or six people took the stage one at a time reading an excerpt from the book and giving a personal story about the author. Two musicians performed songs they had written specifically for the book.

 

Her social media campaign provided exposure. People were tweeting and updating their Facebook statuses from the launch. Pictures and videos were posted online. It got a lot of social media play. She also sold and signed dozens of books at the event.

 

So, how do I feel about the event afterward? I would have done things a little differently, but overall, I think it was a risk worth taking. It felt like a big deal. The other attendees were excited to be part of such an event. It just felt special. The potential for exponential word-of-mouth growth is significant. If you have the funds, I would recommend throwing yourself a party for your next book launch.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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How To Throw A Book Launch Party For Free

The Launch Party

2,348 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, promotions, book_launch
1

Getting a book review is tough process. It takes a tremendous amount of patience and an incredible degree of professionalism. In short, you have to approach reviewers with your publisher hat on, not your author hat. Be confident about the quality of your book without being a braggart. Most importantly don't do any of the following:

 

1. Comment spamming – This isn't necessarily specific to book reviewers. I'm talking about any comment section anywhere on the Internet. Posting a link to your book about a cat lady turned private detective in the comment section of an unrelated blog or social media post is more than a wasted effort. It damages your author brand. Do not post blindly about your book. It's okay to post about your book in the comment section of various blogs (as long as it doesn't violate the bloggers rules), but do it tastefully and pick your spots carefully. Make sure there's a logical tie-in to your book. Remember, the comment you leave should never be a request for reviews.

 

2. The review challenge – Don't seek out reviewers in the virtual-verse and then challenge them to not like your book. Insisting that it's so good they can't help but like it is most likely setting yourself up for a bad review coming your way. Reviewers are busy, and they don't react well to such gimmicks to get their attention.

 

3. The review plea – Challenging a reviewer to not like your book is only slightly worse than begging a reviewer to read and review your book. When you come off as desperate, you come off as unprofessional and unworthy of any kind of attention for you or your book.

 

Your book is worth reading. You know that, but don't let your frustration get the best of you when a reviewer passes. Doing so could lead you down a path that will put your author brand at risk. Keep calm, and keep writing. The reviews and accolades will come if you commit to your craft and present yourself in a professional manner.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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A Few Indie Book Review Media Sources

Use Good Judgment When Asking for Reviews

3,501 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, reviews, author, help, writers, readers, writing, book_reviews, author_tips, author_advice
1

November is National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). Are you participating? If so, good for you! Given the inherent deadline of the movement, I'd like to share one of the most important lessons I've learned about writing books: If you try to make every sentence sound perfect NOW, you'll never get anywhere.

 

When I was writing my first novel, anytime I found myself stuck about where to go next with the plot, I would go back and wordsmith what I'd already written. At the time, I reasoned that as long as I was working on the book, I was making progress. Looking back, however, I realized what I was really doing was procrastinating! I was putting off the hard work of developing the plot, instead choosing to spend hours and hours fine-tuning what I'd already written. The problem with that approach is if you don't push the story forward, you will never finish the book. (Click here for my post on how to keep the plot moving.)

 

If you want to complete (the first draft of) a 50,000-word novel in a month, I suggest you take a clinical approach and set one of two goals, depending on your schedule:

 

A)  Write 1,600 words each day

B)  Write 2,500 words each weekend day and 1,300 words each weekday

 

Writing that many words, especially if you're working full-time and/or have kids, is quite a task, but it's doable. The key is consistency. Skipping even one day will put you way behind, so don't even consider that as an option. And if you find yourself on a roll at some point, keep writing! There's nothing wrong with going over your daily quota.

 

Once you finish the first draft, by all means go back and edit from the beginning. And you know what? As you read the story with fresh eyes, you'll probably end up cutting some things that for whatever reason don't work for the story anymore. Just think how glad you'll be you didn't waste your valuable time and energy tinkering with them.

 

Good luck!

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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How to Stay Committed to NaNoWriMo

How to Write a Novel in a Month

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