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Go Big

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 16, 2014

I was at a baseball game a few weeks ago, and I met a woman who was acting as a publicist for an author in my area. They were old friends, and she has a background in event planning, so she volunteered to help the author organize a book launch. I was lucky enough to score an invite.

 

And this isn't just any launch. The launch will be catered and will be held in an old movie theater that's used as a venue for various parties, receptions, and festivals. In other words, they are going BIG with this launch. 

 

This is a debut author going the indie route. And I have to tell you, when I first heard the plans, I cringed a little bit. My own fears of failure tainted my opinion. What if no one shows up? What if everyone shows up, but no one cares? What if the media doesn't cover the event? What if, what if, what if. When I stepped away from the conversation and let the idea twirl around in my head, I let go of my expectations, and I actually got excited for the author.

 

You know what? Good for her. She's celebrating the announcement of her debut novel with all the fanfare that was once commonplace in publishing. She's surrounding the event with pomp and circumstance, and it's bound to give all those in attendance the feeling that they are participating in something special; a feeling that will send them to Facebook, Twitter and Instagram uploading photos of their night out celebrating a book launch. It has the potential to become somewhat of a sensation, more so than if the author just sent out a tweet about her new book.

 

Suddenly, I find myself of big fan of going big with a book launch. How about you? Do you have a book launch strategy that you would like to share?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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How To Throw A Book Launch Party For Free

The Book Relaunch

 

2,241 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, promotions, book_launch
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Jog Your Memory: The Effects of Exercise on the Brain - Michael Hyatt

An infographic that shows how exercise can help your brain stay in writing shape.             

                                                    

How a Strong Circle of Influence Can Increase Your Results - The Future of Ink

Start building contacts with skills to help effectively spread the word for future releases.    

 

Film

                                                        

How Short Should a Short Be? - Film Shortage

Where your audience will see the film makes a big difference when deciding on the length of your short.    

                                          

For Jennifer, Whomever You Are - Advice on How to Pursue Your Art - Filmmaker IQ

Helpful advice for a photographer that also applies to filmmakers.    

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Songwriter Vocal Strain: Hazards of Singing While Writing Songs - Judy Rodman

The key is to ease in and pace yourself when using vocals to write a song.

 

Know about Your Acoustic Guitar - Musician Makers

A detailed look at all the parts of an acoustic guitar.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- June 6, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- May 30, 2014

1,930 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, indie, movies, writers, publishing, writing, films, promotions, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media
7

I just completed the first draft and first rewrite of a new novel, and it is now in the hands of beta readers. I'm in that horrible no-man's land where I await their feedback before I undertake a second rewrite. It's horrible because I have no idea how delusional I was in thinking this manuscript was ready to be seen by someone other than my wife or myself. A few beta readers have contacted me privately with encouraging feedback, and I must admit to breathing a sigh of relief upon receiving their messages.

 

The thing that has me so on edge with this story is the way I structured my protagonist. He's the most despicable good guy I've ever created. I've played around with various unsavory skeletons in the closets of my heroes before, but this time I fell in league with a fictional good guy that has more in common with Hannibal Lecter than he does with Harry Potter.

 

Allowing such a character to lead a story is tricky business, but here are the five rules I followed in order to create this good guy who is anything but:

 

  1. He is beloved - Even though this protagonist is an awful character, he has at least one person who is totally devoted to him and believes in him no matter what.

  2. He is resolutely loyal to another human being - Conversely, while he does terrible things, he does genuinely care for another human being and even looks out for him at tremendous cost.

  3. He is what he can't control - While he does bad things, he is a product of his past and the misfortune that was heaped upon him. He's bad because he believes being good cost him everything.

  4. He is honorable - That sounds like a counterintuitive statement about a guy who does bad things, but he never pretends to be anything other than what he is, and he never apologizes for it.

  5. He is vulnerable - He does heartless things, but that doesn't mean he doesn't have a heart. He displays blips of weaknesses that give the readers a glimpse of his sensitive side.  

 

Now all the feedback isn't in yet, and I can't truly say I've nailed it, but early word seems to indicate he won't be the focus of my second rewrite. How about you? How bad are your good guys?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Make Your Protagonist Likable

Defend Your Antagonist

4,098 Views 7 Comments Permalink Tags: writing, craft, branding, character_development, character_arc
0

A few posts ago, I discussed a grammatical error authors tend to make when writing their own bios. Another common mistake I see in author bios is the capitalization of the titles they hold in their day jobs.

 

Here's a typical example:

 

John Smith, Author of Book ABC, is the Director of Human Resources at Company XYZ. In his free time he loves to surf, play practical jokes on his coworkers and toss a baseball around with his three young sons. He currently lives in San Diego.

 

While John sounds like a fun guy, he could use a little refresher on the rules of capitalization. Here's how it works:

 

If a person's formal title comes directly before the person's name, it is capitalized:

 

  • The White House has announced that President Barack Obama will be giving a press conference this afternoon.

 

  • It is expected that Vice President Joe Biden will also give some remarks.

 

  • It is uncertain whether Chief of Staff Denis McDonough will be in attendance.

 

If the formal title is after the person's name, it is not capitalized:

 

  • Barack Obama, who is president of the United States, will be giving a press conference this afternoon.

 

  • Joe Biden, who is vice president, will also give some remarks.

 

  • It is uncertain if Denis McDonough, Obama's chief of staff, will be in attendance.

 

As for the title of "author," it is not formal and should never be capitalized, so the following are correct:

 

  • John Smith, author of Book ABC, is the director of human resources.

 

  • The author of Book ABC is John Smith.

 

Capitalizing formal titles after a person's name is such a common mistake that you might be quite surprised to learn that it's incorrect. But pick up a newspaper and read an article or two. You'll see how the journalists do it.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Grammar Tip: Who vs. That

Grammar Tip: She and I, Not Her and I

2,432 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, grammar, capitalization, job_titles
3

No matter who publishes our books, we authors typically write our own bios, especially those that go on our websites, LinkedIn profiles, Facebook pages, and so on. I read a lot of them that begin something like this:

 

  • Jane Doe is a nurse that always wanted to write a book, so one day she decided to go for it...

 

  • John Smith was having trouble getting his manuscript noticed by traditional publishers, but he isn't a person that backs away from a challenge, so he chose the indie route and has had great success...

 

  • Jane Doe is a licensed therapist that works with people of all ages to help them manage post-traumatic stress disorder...

 

These are all compelling statements, but unfortunately they also contain a common grammatical mistake: They use THAT when they should be using WHO. The error immediately jumps out at me, and unfortunately it makes me wonder if their book is also filled with grammatical errors.

 

To clarify the difference, WHO refers to people. THAT refers to things.

 

Here's how each of the above should read:

 

  • Jane Doe is a nurse who always wanted to write a book, so one day she decided to for it...

 

  • John Smith was having trouble getting his manuscript noticed by traditional publishers, but he isn't a person who backs away from a challenge, so he chose the indie route and has had great success...

 

  • Jane Doe is a licensed therapist who works with people of all ages to help them manage post-traumatic stress disorder...

 

As I've said many times in this blog, if your marketing materials have grammatical errors in them, it creates a negative impression of your writing, no matter how great your writing may actually be. Do you make the who/that mistake in your bio or other marketing materials? If so, a simple fix can make a big difference!

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Why Good Grammar Matters

They Should Have Paid Attention in English Class

2,385 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writers, writing, grammar_tip
2

Recently, I wrote a post encouraging indie authors to get excited about publishing a novel, or novels as the case may be. Any way you slice it, it's a huge accomplishment, and copious amounts of celebratory fervor are warranted.

 

Want another reason to celebrate? Look no further than your readers. The very people who give their time to read your book(s), are more than enough reason to get out your dancing shoes and thank the powers of your choosing for bringing them into your life. Something you created was read by other human beings. That's so cool, it's inspiring.

 

I don't care if you've heard from one reader or a thousand; it's something to get excited about. Not too long ago, writers had limited options when it came to finding readers. The publishing industry was funnel shaped with a herd of writers trying to find their way through a narrow passageway to the market. Only a relative few made it through to the other side.

 

You live in an age where that funnel has been converted into a bridge open to anyone with a completed manuscript. Those readers that were only accessible to a few are now accessible to us all. Thank the stars above for those readers. Reach out to them and let them know that you understand how special they are, and you appreciate the time they've devoted to reading your novel.

 

So, just as you celebrated the publication of your novel, celebrate the readers, both actual and potential. Get excited about all those readers you now have access to.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Supporting Indie Authors

Recognize Your Readers

1,902 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, writing, promotions
0

The Mid-Novel Crisis

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 27, 2014

"What have I done?"

 

It's a phrase I utter often during the writing process. It usually first happens about midway through the first draft after the exhilaration of spawning a new idea gives way to the tedium of seeing that idea through to the end. I call it the mid-novel crisis.

 

I've talked with enough writers to know I'm not the only one to experience it. Turns out writing a novel is a bit like a relationship. There's that wonderful phase at the beginning where you're embraced by the warm light of euphoria. Nothing can go wrong. You write without restraint, marveling at how easily the story is coming to you. Then one day you wake up and there's a bit of struggle to get a few pages out. The subplot that you were counting on never really takes shape. The secondary characters aren't really adding anything to your story. But, you shrug it off and feel a sense of satisfaction that you've hung in there as long as you have. Tomorrow is another day.

 

The only thing is tomorrow brings more struggles, maybe even a little regret that you didn't pay more attention to the words that were pouring out of you the weeks before. You're paying for that reckless abandon now. Your free-wheeling ways have backed you into a character arc that's falling apart and a plot that is just plain blah. The thought of ditching the book altogether and starting a new one becomes a viable option, one you never thought possible in the beginning. How did it come to this?

 

Here's the thing. Writing a book isn't a relationship that will sour if you set it aside for a while. There's no danger that a story will leave you if you stop paying attention to it. I know the panic that sets in at the mid-novel crisis point. It's not real. It only feels real because you're pressing. So, take a break from the story if you're just not feeling it anymore. Start your other book. I think what you'll find is when you step away from a book that's not working anymore, your mind will give rise to solutions that eluded before.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Moral of the Story

The Micro Story Challenge

1,976 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, writing
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Beyond your first and foremost obligation to the story as a writer, you have a sacred responsibility to the reader, and that responsibility is to make him or her feel. Whether it's fear, anger, happiness or sadness, you publish a book with the promise that if someone takes precious time out of his or her life to read your book, that reader will experience an emotional jolt of some kind, somewhere within the confines of your story.

 

Such a responsibility can weigh heavily on writers' shoulders - so heavily, in fact, they may become conscious storytellers and step away from their instincts. The second they do that, they lose perspective and crank out page after page of thin, one-dimensional writing. Nobody wins when that happens.

 

Here's the key to telling a sad story: Include some laughs. The key to telling a funny story? Make them cry a few times. Balance is the foundation of depth. A writer who tries to manipulate the primary emotion of his or her genre usually doesn't write a book worth reading. On the other hand, a writer who steps outside the emotional bounds associated with the genre delivers a story that draws readers in and gives them a wholly satisfying experience. Make your horror novel scary, but make it poignant and funny too.

 

To fulfill your emotional contract with readers, provide them a story that includes a spectrum of emotions. If you give them a little balance as they read, it will mean that much more when you knock them off their feet with your pivotal emotional moment.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Don't Insult Your Readers

Feeling Emotion for Characters

1,992 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, laugh, cry, emotion
0

How to Be Cool

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger May 12, 2014

I have a confession: I want to be cool. Call it vanity. Call it shortsighted. Call it shallow. I can't help it. I want to be cool like Fonzie. The fact that I referenced a character that hasn't been on TV in 30 years gives you some idea how far from cool I actually am, but it's a goal nonetheless.

 

In the world of storytelling and writing, being cool means that I must write something that's clever and innovative. I have to dig deep and come up with a passage, plot or character that is subtly unique, something that strikes a chord and bends a genre. It is the equivalent of scoring a touchdown.

 

Here's the trap I try to avoid: I can't force "coolness." I'm in the early stages of writing a new novel, and by early stages, I mean I've written one line and devoted a lot of daydreaming to plot points and dialogue. I've come up with what I think is a really cool sequence of events that will culminate with some really killer dialogue and can't wait to incorporate it into the storyline. The problem is I have no idea at this point if it will fit into the storyline, and no matter how much I love this series of events, I can't wedge it into my story just because I think it's cool.

 

Don't let your love for elements of a story prevent you from cutting it if it doesn't fit with the rest of the book. As a writer, you can explore and take risks with a story. As an editor, you have to give yourself permission to cut and slash scenes, characters, chapters, dialogue, whatever doesn't add value to your novel. Sometimes you have to be ruthless on rewrites in order to be really cool.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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When You Cut a Scene You Like, Save It!

A Good Writer Can Ruin a Good Story

2,695 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, cool
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Writing a One-Page Business Plan: 5 Questions a Self-Publisher Must Ask - Self-Publishing Review

Tap into the entrepreneurial segment of your creative mind.    

                                       

How to Structure a Killer Novel Ending - Writer's Digest

Have you mastered the fourth part of storytelling?      

 

Film

                                                        

10 Surprising Ways Famous Film Special Effects Were Made - Tech Radar

The answer to "How'd they do that?"   

 

10 Films That Can Teach You Everything You Need To Know About Cinematography - Taste of Cinema

Recording movement to establish a mood - that's what cinematography is all about.      

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

How to Practice Your Voice without Irritating the Neighbors - Judy Rodman

The apartment complex conundrum: how to warm up your pipes without being a bad neighbor.

 

The Future of Music Discovery Is In the Numbers - Hypebot.com

Tracking who's listening to what is changing the music industry like never before.  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- May 2, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- April 25, 2014

2,774 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, writing, business_plan, strategy, voice, music_business, cinematography, plot_development, film_editing, music_exercises, special_effects, sel
1

To truly know your characters, you have to spend time with them outside of the book - away from the plot and surroundings they are used to. You have to pluck them from their cozy storylines and throw them into an unfamiliar situation to understand what makes them tick.

 

One of the most common character-building exercises when I was taking creative writing classes was to imagine a setting where your character is a stranger in a room full of people. As he or she progresses into the scene, others will make judgments based on appearance and awkward interactions. How will your character respond? What will he or she say or do? How will your character judge the others in the room?

 

The most common setting for this exercise is a school lunchroom. Many of us have memories of entering the cafeteria for the first time and getting a lay of the land, both physically and socially. If you've ever been a new kid at school, this memory is likely especially etched into your brain. It borders on traumatizing for some, while others find it exhilarating. Where on the spectrum would your character fall?

 

It doesn't have to be a school cafeteria. It can be the break room at work or a party or wherever. That's your call, but to truly flesh out your character and dive deep into his or her psyche, make sure he or she is the only stranger in the room. The stress of being unknown is a great way to see your character from a new perspective.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Building Character

Defining Characters through Action, Not Description

5,880 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_development
3

I'm currently working on my seventh novel, and one of the most valuable lessons I've learned about the writing process is when to hit pause on a particular scene/sentence/description and move on. If you're a perfectionist or Type-A personality, that can be hard to do, but it's extremely important. Trust me!

 

When I was writing my first novel, if I wasn't sure where to take the story next, I would spend countless hours tweaking, editing, refining, and tinkering the words I already had written. Where did that get me? Nowhere! The problem with spending too much time on a particular area of the book is that you aren't moving the story forward, and if you don't move the story forward, you will never finish the book. I'm convinced this is why it takes some people ten years to complete the first draft of a novel. They work so hard making every sentence perfect that it takes forever to get to the finish line.

 

A good trick I've learned is to use the ALL CAPS function. My current manuscript is filled with notes in ALL CAPS such as:

 

  • WRITE SOMETHING FUNNY HERE
  • FLESH OUT THE DESCRIPTION OF THIS RESTAURANT
  • ADD IN SOMETHING HERE ABOUT WHY THEY GOT DIVORCED
  • FIX THIS- SOUNDS WEIRD
  • MAKE THIS DESCRIPTION BETTER
  • DOES THIS MAKE SENSE?

 

It would be easy to spend days, if not weeks working on the above issues, but at the end of the day, they are details that aren't critical to the story. If I want to finish the novel, my focus has to be on progressing the story.

 

Once you finish the first draft, then it's time to go back and fix all the problem areas you've put in ALL CAPS along the way. That's where the fun begins, because you know you're in the home stretch!

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind and Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Save the Wordsmithing for Later

How to Get Through the First Draft

7,103 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, all_caps
0

Including hyperlinks in your marketing materials is a great way to send people to your Amazon page, or your website, or your Facebook page or anywhere you want them to go. But the actual links can be long and quite unsightly, so I suggest using the text function to make them look clean, pretty and professional.

 

Let's use the e-mail signature as an example. Including a clever blurb about your books and a hyperlink or two in your e-mail signature is a fantastic marketing strategy that I've been recommending for as long as I've been writing this blog. However, I often receive e-mails from authors that include crazy long links. To protect the guilty, I'm making up the following author name and blurb and using hyperlinks to my own content.

 

EXAMPLE OF AN ATTRACTIVE E-MAIL SIGNATURE:

 

Name, author of ABC and XYZ, thrillers that make you scared to sleep

Check out my books on Amazon

Like me on Facebook

 

EXAMPLE OF A MESSY E-MAIL SIGNATURE:

Name, author of ABC and XYZ, thrillers that make you scared to sleep

 

Check out my books on Amazon!

 

http://www.amazon.com/Cassidy-Lane-Maria-Murnane-ebook/dp/B00FAH87IU/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=&qid=

 

http://www.amazon.com/Perfect-Paper-Adventures-Waverly-Bryson-ebook/dp/B002WGC8JG/ref=pd_sim_kstore_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=09QT2D7WPHMFSVXP5T3R

 

Here's my Facebook author page!

https://www.facebook.com/mariamurnane

 

To make a clean hyperlink in a Word document, type in the text you want to use, then highlight the text and right click. Choose the "hyperlink" option in the drop-down menu. Under the "address" function, paste in the actual hyperlink.

 

The hyperlink option varies by e-mail program, but it shouldn't be too hard to figure out in the "signature" option.

 

Much of book marketing is making a positive first impression. Clean and pretty looks professional. Messy and unwieldy? Not so much. Which of the above e-mail signatures would impress you? Play around with your own until you come up with something good. I know you can do it!

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind and Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Marketing Idea: Encourage Your Fans to Spread the Word

Three Easy Marketing Ideas

3,367 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, hyperlinks, email_signatures
0

Outline Swap

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Apr 28, 2014

There's a story going around that intrigues me about a prolific famous author. I'll withhold the name of the author in case the story is more urban legend than fact, but the identity of the author isn't important. The facts (whether based on rumor or reality) are what led to an idea I call the outline swap.

 

This author allegedly has become more of a brand than a writer. The demands for his books are so high he can't realistically keep up with the call for the release of new titles. Instead of putting his reading public off while he pens a new book, he simply does an outline handoff. He sketches out the idea for a story in a detailed outline and then hires another author to write a book based on his outline. The title is released as a coauthored novel. This process has allowed him to release approximately 20 books in a three-year span.

 

Now let's take that idea and convert it to an indie-friendly version. For this to work, we have to acknowledge that an indie author is more of a writer than a brand, though indie authors do tend to have motivated communities built around their author brands. What if we take two authors with active readerships, and instead of releasing one coauthored book, they release two coauthored books simultaneously? How? By having each author create a detailed outline for separate books, and then swapping the outlines, after which they write each other's novel. Set a time frame (three to fourth months) to complete the manuscripts, and then set up a campaign for the concurrent release of both books.

 

Like any coauthored effort, this will take an incredible amount of cooperation, trust and coordination, but think of the potential payoff. Two indie authors will pull their communities together to release two co-written novels. Each author's fan base is likely to expand, and the sales for their previously written titles could expand as well.

 

What do you think? Could you see yourself participating in an outline swap?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Form an Author Co-op

Advice for Co-authoring a Book

2,698 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, branding
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The Last Few Days at London Book Fair Have Been Mind-blowing for Me -The Creative Penn

An excellent breakdown of the news that really mattered coming out of the London Book Fair.             

                                                    

How Authors Can Market Themselves as Experts - Marketing Tips for Authors

Authors of fiction can be experts too.     

 

Film

                                                        

10 Filmmaking Myths: Busted - Raindance

Elliot Grove, the founder of the Raindance Film Festival, dishes on the myths he has come across on his independent film journey.   

                                          

Case Study: "Memory Lane" - A Lesson in Sustainable Indie Filmmaking on No Budget - IndieNYC

How an independent filmmaker secured an international distribution deal for a film with a $300 budget.       

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Live Shows! How to Squeeze More Marketing Power Out of Your Music Gigs - Bob Baker's The BuzzFactor.com

A live performance is your opportunity to gain a fan for life if you play your social media cards right.

 

Quieting Your Mind for Performance Focus - Judy Rodman

Your vocal performance depends on your state of mind.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- April 18, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- April 11, 2014

3,042 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, music, film, author, writing, musicians, filmmakers
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