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800 Posts tagged with the writing tag
1

Word Count Paralysis

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jul 23, 2014

Sometimes staring at the blinking cursor on your computer screen can make it morph into a stop sign and prevent you from holding a thought long enough to tap it out on your keyboard. It can be an unintentional panic signal that freezes your fingers in place and fills you with heaping helpings of writer's doubt. Your focus shifts from what you want to write to how many words you must write before you will allow yourself to stop for the day. Gradually, you fixate exclusively on that word count goal, and you're unable to type a single solitary word.

 

I call it "word count paralysis," and there's really only one way to prevent it: Ditch the daily word count goal. In the end, it doesn't really matter how many words you write in a day. Your only goal is to make some sort of progress; big or small, it doesn't matter. The only thing that does matter is that you advance from where you were the day before.

I've talked before about my own word count philosophy in previous blogs. My goal while writing a book is to write one word a day. Not only have I never come short of my goal, I have far exceeded that one-word-a-day benchmark every single time, occasionally by as much as 6,000 times.  

 

Daily word count goals always have been the bane of my writing existence. They have served as arbitrary roadblocks that fill me with dread. As long as I ask myself to contribute only one word a day to a story, I am relieved of that pressure that leads to word count paralysis.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Writing a Word a Day

Unblocking Writer's Block

3,658 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: books, author, writers, writing, draft, writing_process, word_count, chapter_length
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice, and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The Arc of the Indie Author Journey: From First Book to CEO of Your Global Media Empire - The Creative Penn

Being master of your own destiny can be daunting, but you can afford to learn as you go.

                           

15-Minute Book Marketing Tactics for Busy Authors - All Indie Writers

Making time for marketing just got a lot easier.     

 

Film

                                                        

How to Crowdfund like Humphrey Bogart - Filmmaking Stuff

Here's looking at...some basic yet effective crowdfunding strategies.    

                                          

Very, Very Independent Filmmaking - Getting on with It - NOHO Art District

Immersing yourself in the film community can go a long way in helping you become a successful filmmaker.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Starting a Music Career - Musician Coaching.com

Music consultant and former A&R representative Rick Goetz shares his philosophy on getting your music career off the ground.

 

How to Use Twitter to Attract Fans and Make Connections - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

Use Twitter to connect with fans, journalists, venues, and music idols. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- July 11, 2014

Weekly News Roundup - July 3, 2014

1,949 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, music, film, author, writers, writing, musicians, filmmakers
1

Adjectives modify nouns or pronouns (What a pretty house! She is tall).

 

Adverbs modify verbs (She types quickly), adjectives (She is extremely tall) or other adverbs (Please type more quickly).

 

When an adverb modifies an adjective (e.g. "she is extremely tall," no hyphen is necessary. I see many authors make this error in their book descriptions and personal bios. For example:

 

  • The world in this story is inhabited by fully-functional robots that act like humans (INCORRECT)
  • The tale takes place on a currently-active landfill (INCORRECT)
  • When he's not writing books, John works as a highly-trained specialist managing labor disputes (INCORRECT)

 

A good way to tell that a hyphen isn't necessary is to remove the adjective and leave the adverb, then see if the sentence still makes sense. For example, do these sound correct to you?

 

  • This world in this story is inhabited by fully robots that act like humans (SOUNDS SUPER WEIRD)
  • The tale takes place on a currently landfill (SOUNDS SUPER WEIRD)
  • When he's not writing books, John works as a highly specialist managing labor disputes (SOUNDS SUPER WEIRD)

 

The above sentences don't make sense because once we remove the adjectives "functional," "active" and "trained," the adverbs "fully," "currently"and "highly"aren't modifying anything.

 

Note: when two words are used to modify (or relate to) the same word in what is called compound modifier, a hyphen clarifies that they are both referring to that word and not to each other. For example:

 

  • He is a small business owner (This means he is a small man)
  • He is a small-business owner (This means he owns a small business)

 

I know grammar terminology is a foreign language to many people, so if you're still confused about whether or not to use a hyphen when you have an adverb followed by an adjective, try removing the adjective. If the sentence doesn't work without it, no hyphen is necessary.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.



 

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Grammar Tip: Don't Overcapitalize

Misuse of Pronouns

2,896 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: editing, author, writers, writing, draft, grammar, hyphens, grammar_tip, editing_process
3

I'm in the early stages of writing a new book. To date, I have written about 12,000 words of a planned total of 100,000 words. I'm going to give you a brutal assessment of the work I've done so far: It's horrible. The main character is flat, the villain is over the top, and the setting isn't really that well developed.

 

 

But here's the thing: I don't care. My goal at this stage is to get to the 100,000 words mark with as few distractions a possible. The biggest distraction I encounter when writing a novel is that little voice in my head that constantly asks, "What on earth are you doing?" And for kicks, it chimes in with a "If anyone ever sees this, your career is over."

 

 

Every time my inner voice speaks up, I reply with "I don't care." I say it so many times within the confines of my bald head that it's become my writing mantra. "I don't care. I don't care. I don't care." The truth is no one will ever see this version of my book. I won't be judged by anyone outside of my own internal imaginary critic. My inner voice will try to destroy my ability to sally forth. When I get to the rewriting stage, I'll sing a different tune, but now is not the time to even think about how I'm going to fix this mess. Now is the time to make this mess.

 

 

I invite you to borrow my mantra. Use it every time your own inner critic attempts to halt the progress of your first draft. Shout it loudly if you must and shout it proudly. I don't care!

 

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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How to Get Through the First Draft

Writing Tip: When You Get Stuck, Use ALL CAPS and Move On

2,679 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: books, editing, author, writers, publishing, revisions, writing, drafts, beginning, rewriting, writing_stages
4

Making the first chapter of your book (or books) available on your website is a smart idea for two reasons:

 

1)    It gives potential readers who visit your website the opportunity to check out your work at no cost

2)    It gives you a tool for driving potential readers to your website

 

My sixth novel is coming out soon, and I have the first chapters to all of them available on my website. One way I use those links is via social media. Four of my books make up a series starring the same protagonist, so I created a Facebook profile for her. Every day I log in to her account to see if any of her "friends" have a birthday. For those who do, I post the link to the first chapter of her latest book on their walls as a little "birthday gift." It's fun for me, and my fans really enjoy it too! (The personal interaction with my readers is another benefit of this approach.)

 

I also include a link to the first chapter in my monthly newsletter anytime I announce that I have a new book coming out. This allows my loyal readers to get an early glimpse. The same goes for Twitter. If you read my post on using Twitter you'll know I don't recommend tweeting too much about your book (or only about your book), but an occasional link to a first chapter is perfectly acceptable. And smart.

 

Remember that you're competing with literally millions of other books, so anything you can do to get potential readers to look at your book is worth trying. Why not put your first chapter out there? It's free, and people like free.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Marketing Tip: Make Sure Your Outreach Has a Purpose

Marketing Tip: Reach Out to Book Clubs

 

6,333 Views 4 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, promotions
2

In the early stages of my indie publishing career, I would hand off a manuscript to willing friends and family and ask for their feedback before I published. There was no word for it back then, but now we call them beta readers. For my first and second books, it was only two or three readers. Over the years the pool of people willing to read early draft versions of my books has grown. In fact, my latest group had 23 people, most of whom I only knew through social media.

 

Because the group included more than my immediate circle of family and friends, I wanted to make the process of being a beta reader as friendly as I possibly could. So, I did something that is not typical of my personality. I got organized, and it was simpler than I even thought. Here's how I managed my beta readers.

 

  • A communications hub - I used the private Facebook messaging tool as a gathering place for all the readers, and it became our communications hub. Over the weeks they spent reading the book, I prompted them with information and updates pertaining to the story and characters. This caused discussion and also served as a gentle reminder that it was a fairly time-sensitive task that they had entered into.

  • Two versions of the manuscript - I created two versions of the manuscript to accommodate everyone's eBook reader needs. I uploaded both a PDF version and Word document to my blog and provided the links to everyone via Facebook, so readers could download the version that fit their eBook devices.

  • A survey - Rather than force them to email me their feedback, I created a survey where they could rank various aspects of the book (14 in all). In addition, they were all welcome (but not required) to comment on each specific area and leave a general comment at the end of the survey. Perhaps the most important element of the survey is that all participants' responses were anonymous, and I made this known to all participants. I wanted honest feedback, and letting them remain anonymous was key.

  • Patience and understanding - I was asking a lot of these volunteers, so it was important for me to not make them feel rushed. Beyond my updates I never sent out direct requests to hurry up and fill out the survey. I could have tacked on a deadline at the beginning, but I decided not to. I had plenty on my plate, so I didn't mind waiting. After three weeks I had enough completed surveys to announce some early results. In all, 16 of the 23 readers completed surveys. I would have been happy with a 25% response rate. Getting almost 70% was more than I hoped for.

  • Appreciation - I frequently let them all know I appreciated the time they were devoting to my book.


Would I ever do a large beta reader group again? Absolutely! I got incredibly helpful feedback for rewrites, and thanks to social media, I was able to keep in constant touch with the group and be even more engaged with readers. I would highly recommend it to any author wanting to make a story better and create a closer bond with fans at the same time.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Go Big

Another Reason to Celebrate

3,178 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, beta_readers
0

Vlogging

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jul 2, 2014

I watch a lot of personal videos, or "vlogs," online. In fact, I have three or four vloggers whom I watch regularly. I gravitate toward these vlogs for various reasons. I often share the same views as the vlogger. They offer a unique twist on various topics, or they're simply entertaining.

 

Those are the obvious elements of a vlog that make them eminently watchable, and the last two I listed are things that can be improved over time. But what about the less apparent factors that make a vlog popular? Those things that you don't really notice or consider when you tell your friends and followers about this great vlogger they should check out? What draws you in beyond the obvious?

Here are the unnoticed elements that I've found make the biggest difference:

 

  1. Clean audio ? Even though it's a visual medium, online personal videos are best consumed when the audio doesn't come with distortion, humming, or clicking. The vloggers I enjoy use external microphones. Those microphones are either visibly nestled snuggly in a stand in front of the host or are off frame attached to a boom. An external microphone will add cost to your video production, but it is well worth the investment if you're planning on making vlogs a staple in your brand-building strategy.

  2. A permanent set ? Because a vlog is a visual medium, visuals do count. Having a set that is tactfully designed can move you from amateur vlogger to expert vlogger. You don't have to make a huge investment here. Having various props that are strategically placed in the background and well-maintained is good enough. One of my favorite vloggers even hosts his videos from behind a desk, and he frames the shot so he can throw up graphics over his shoulder. Essentially it looks like a news desk.

  3. Good lighting ? Again, this is a visual medium, so lighting matters. A well-lit room with a dimmer might do the trick, but you may even want to invest in an inexpensive lighting kit with fill and key lights.

 

Vlogging can be the perfect tool to build your brand in this virtual world if you invest time and modest amounts of resources in the production value.

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

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Five Blogging Prompts

Build Your Brand with Original Content

2,629 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, audio, writers, writing, social_media, marketing_ideas, marketing_strategy, vlogging, video_blog, video_marketing
2

No matter who publishes your book, it's important to do what you can to promote it. That means reaching out to many different organizations, which takes time, energy, and a lot of following up.

 

To keep track of your efforts (and your progress), I suggest creating a master spreadsheet with a separate page for each type of organization you contact (e.g., alumni groups, book clubs, bloggers, press, etc.). The fields can be very basic, including details such as name, organization, email address, website, and status.

 

Once you begin your outreach, color coding can help you keep track of your progress. For example, let's say you contact local alumni clubs of your alma mater to see if they'll include a mention of your book in their newsletter. I suggest putting clubs who have said yes in green, those who need some follow-up in yellow, and those who have said "thanks but no thanks" in red. With color coding, every so often, you can skim through your spreadsheet and know which areas need some attention.

 

When you first begin your outreach, you may think you'll be able to remember necessary details about each group, but trust me, you won't. Sending out a bunch of emails today is one thing, but what happens a month down the road? Which leads were promising? Who asked for more information? Whose email bounced back with an "I'm on vacation" autoreply? If you don't keep track of these things, despite the best of intentions you may end up spinning your wheels and getting nowhere fast.

 

I know it's a lot of work to do what I'm suggesting, but I promise it's worth it! In addition to keeping you organized, a spreadsheet also will help you track your successes, which is a powerful motivator. Book marketing is hard, and the more green sections you have, the more inspired you'll be to keep going.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Build a Plus & Minus Brand Map

The Marketing Maze

2,450 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writers, writing, promotions
4

Sensitive Topics

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 30, 2014

Sensitive topics: they are so hard to avoid when you're telling a story. I recently got into an online discussion about including sensitive and offensive material in a story. One author was so fed up with a particularly ugly topic they vowed never to read another book that contained a mention of it. Even more extreme, the author stated in no uncertain terms that they would encourage others not to read a book with the objectionable material.

 

I expressed my dismay at this attitude for a number of reasons, but the biggest issue I had with it is it has the effect of setting limits on what authors should write about. It's like asking painters to remove a certain color from their palette because not everybody likes it. It just shouldn't be done. The uncomfortable shouldn't be removed from a storyline in an attempt not to offend readers. One of our sacred responsibilities as authors is to go where the story must go no matter how dark that place may be. It's really the only way to write with an authentic voice.

 

A talented storyteller understands this responsibility, and he or she brings the power of context to sensitive topics, a power that adds substance and social significance to subject matters that by themselves could be deemed as offensive.

 

The pushback on my stance is that there's no reason to perpetuate and discuss certain types of offensive material, because it is so obviously offensive. I agree; some things are so horrible and ugly that you'd be hard-pressed to find any decent human being who would be proud to be associated with such material. But by putting even that type of material off limits, you are setting boundaries not to be crossed, and once it's been established that certain boundaries are acceptable, more will be set in an effort to make books even less offensive.

 

Everyone should follow their own paths as writers. Say what must be said without giving a thought to the riches or consequences. Ultimately, you will be judge of the context of what you write, even if it's a sensitive topic.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Should You Be Loyal to Your Characters or Your Readers?

Embracing Your Offensive Side

2,894 Views 4 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, sensitive_topics
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Book Marketing Advice for Self-Publishers [Infographic] - The Independent Publishing Magazine

Advice for indie authors from around the web in one handy infographic.

                           

How Authors Support Their Writing Dreams - The Book Deal

Tips on how to find your write-work balance.    

 

Film

                                                        

Can Film Scripts Help People Understand Anxiety? - The Guardian

Has the constant theme of high anxiety in films helped society come up with more effective treatments for anxiety?    

                                          

Tip of the Day: The Critical Importance of Post Audio - Noam Kroll

Post Audio is so important yet so overlooked and underappreciated.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

3 Tips for Recording Group Vocals with a Single Microphone - The Audio-Technica Blog

Recording group vocalists separately can result in an unnatural sound.

 

Songs and Stories: Bev Barnett's Social Media Balancing Act - Michael Gaither.com

Bev Barnett is an experienced singer, songwriter, and PR person. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- June 20, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- June 13, 2014

2,164 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: music, filmmaking, movies, writing, book_marketing, recording, musicians, filmmakers, social_media, scripts, marketing_ideas, marketing_strategy, vocals, post_audio, marketing_advice
1

In last week's post, I explained when to use the pronouns "I" vs. "me." Today, I'd like to discuss when to use the pronoun "myself," which I've been hearing used incorrectly quite a bit.

 

Here are some common examples of how I hear "myself" used:

 

WHAT THEY SAY:

 

  • He met with George and myself (INCORRECT)
  • George, Harry and myself went to the movies (INCORRECT)
  • You can give the form to Susan or myself (INCORRECT)

 

WHAT THEY SHOULD SAY:

 

  • He met with George and me (CORRECT)
  • George, Harry and I went to the movies (CORRECT)
  • You can give the form to Susan or me (CORRECT)

 

The only time you should use "myself" is in the reflexive sense, which means you're both the subject and the object of a sentence or are referring to yourself. For example:

 

  • I gave myself a pat on the back
  • I went on vacation by myself
  • I knew that if I wanted it done right, I had to do it myself
  • I took a picture of myself
  • I introduced myself to the group

 

The same goes for "yourself," "herself," "themselves," etc.

 

My belief is that people use "myself" incorrectly because they think it sounds fancy, and they associate fancy with correct. But don't be fooled! I know this is tricky stuff; just try to remember that "myself" is NOT a substitute for "I." If you stick to that and keep it simple, you will get it right...all by yourself.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, and Cassidy Lane. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Just Say No to Random Capitalization!

Solving the Mystery of Lie vs. Lay

2,669 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, grammar
5

There are challenges when writing multiple books, especially when the books aren't part of a series or related in any way. You have to wipe the slate clean - clear the storyboard and imagine a whole new fictional world.

 

It is particularly difficult when you decide to examine things from a different vantage point. Switching from first-person perspective to third-person or vice versa can be downright taxing to the frontal cortex. It takes more than a different approach to writing; it takes a different state of mind.

 

The best way I have found to make this 180-degree creative turn is actually a very simple solution. It's something I can correct in the course of an evening. The answer sits on my bookshelves, both real and virtual. It is reading a book written in the perspective in which I want to write. Once I show my mind's eye how other writers have done it, a fog is lifted. The mystery of writing in a different point of view is solved in a creative instant.

 

Now, somewhat of a different challenge occurs when I'm writing two books at once, each written from a different point of view. That has happened quite a few times over the years, and the only way I've been able to keep the perspective straight is to set up a schedule where I devote two to three days to writing the book in the first person, and then switch to the third-person book for a few days. The first day in both instances can be a little frustrating because I will find myself writing in the wrong perspective.

 

What about you? How do you switch perspectives from one project to the next? Do you find it difficult?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Too Many Characters in the Kitchen

Defining Characters through Action, Not Description

3,566 Views 5 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, switching_perspectives
1

All About the Setting

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 18, 2014

Setting is not where your story takes place. I should say it's not only where your story takes place. I am sometimes shocked when even seasoned authors get the meaning of setting wrong. If you ask them their story's setting, they'll reply with a description that is more accurately applied to location. They may respond with "It's in the South," or "It takes place in the woods," or "It's on a farm." These are elements of setting, but they aren't the entire setting.

 

Setting is the condition of the barn. It's the twang in the local barber's voice. It's the thick canopy of the woods that allows for only slivers of light to seep through to the heavily rooted forest floor. Setting is that thing that anchors itself into readers' imaginations and helps them sink into the story. It's your background characters. It's the smells, the colors, and the weather. It's all those details that by themselves amount to nothing more than interesting factoids, but collectively they add compelling depth to your novel. 

 

How you approach setting is as crucial as how you approach character and dialogue, yet it is the forgotten building block of storytelling. If you ask 10 writers what their strong suit is, invariably they will say either creating three-dimensional characters or writing believable dialogue. Not one of them would say they are really good at crafting a fully realized setting that draws the reader in. And it's most likely not because they are lacking in that particular talent; it's simply because they may not consider it important enough to highlight.

 

It is. Setting is the soul of your story. If it's something you do well, proclaim it. It matters. If it's something you don't do well, improve upon it, and it will take your writing to the next level.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Improving Dialogue                                    

Show Them Where to Look

6,358 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: writers, writing, description, story, plot, craft, storyline, author_tips
0

Go Big

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jun 16, 2014

I was at a baseball game a few weeks ago, and I met a woman who was acting as a publicist for an author in my area. They were old friends, and she has a background in event planning, so she volunteered to help the author organize a book launch. I was lucky enough to score an invite.

 

And this isn't just any launch. The launch will be catered and will be held in an old movie theater that's used as a venue for various parties, receptions, and festivals. In other words, they are going BIG with this launch. 

 

This is a debut author going the indie route. And I have to tell you, when I first heard the plans, I cringed a little bit. My own fears of failure tainted my opinion. What if no one shows up? What if everyone shows up, but no one cares? What if the media doesn't cover the event? What if, what if, what if. When I stepped away from the conversation and let the idea twirl around in my head, I let go of my expectations, and I actually got excited for the author.

 

You know what? Good for her. She's celebrating the announcement of her debut novel with all the fanfare that was once commonplace in publishing. She's surrounding the event with pomp and circumstance, and it's bound to give all those in attendance the feeling that they are participating in something special; a feeling that will send them to Facebook, Twitter and Instagram uploading photos of their night out celebrating a book launch. It has the potential to become somewhat of a sensation, more so than if the author just sent out a tweet about her new book.

 

Suddenly, I find myself of big fan of going big with a book launch. How about you? Do you have a book launch strategy that you would like to share?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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How To Throw A Book Launch Party For Free

The Book Relaunch

 

2,267 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, promotions, book_launch
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Jog Your Memory: The Effects of Exercise on the Brain - Michael Hyatt

An infographic that shows how exercise can help your brain stay in writing shape.             

                                                    

How a Strong Circle of Influence Can Increase Your Results - The Future of Ink

Start building contacts with skills to help effectively spread the word for future releases.    

 

Film

                                                        

How Short Should a Short Be? - Film Shortage

Where your audience will see the film makes a big difference when deciding on the length of your short.    

                                          

For Jennifer, Whomever You Are - Advice on How to Pursue Your Art - Filmmaker IQ

Helpful advice for a photographer that also applies to filmmakers.    

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Songwriter Vocal Strain: Hazards of Singing While Writing Songs - Judy Rodman

The key is to ease in and pace yourself when using vocals to write a song.

 

Know about Your Acoustic Guitar - Musician Makers

A detailed look at all the parts of an acoustic guitar.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- June 6, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- May 30, 2014

1,947 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, indie, movies, writers, publishing, writing, films, promotions, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media
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