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806 Posts tagged with the writing tag
1

 

I've taken part in a lot of conversations. I've listened to a lot of conversations. I've even eavesdropped on more than a few. I've discovered one secret key element of conversations that makes them interesting, maddening, and authentic all at once, and I'm going to reveal that secret to you.

 

But first let me explain how I came to discover this secret: I discovered it by reading. That's right, I didn't notice it until I identified it in a book called The Dog of the South by Charles Portis. This component of conversation is so engrained in our culture that we don't even know it's there. It's a stealthy stitch that ties verbal communication together and builds relationships in awkward and fundamentally human ways.

 

Okay, here's the secret. Are you ready for this? People spend huge chunks of conversations not listening to one another. They are so consumed with interjecting and making their points about a topic that they zone out and make non sequiturs that jumble conversations up into nearly incoherent exchanges. In most conversations, the people involved have their own agendas, and they put a great deal of effort into fulfilling those agendas, even at the expense of listening. Here's the kicker. Somehow the communicators always seem to find their way back to salient points.

 

For most people, getting to the point of a conversation is a long, winding road. When you're writing dialogue for your characters, taking tidy steps where characters are responding to each other on point instead of servicing their own conversational agenda doesn't give you a realistic back and forth. Try playing around with the "not listening" technique and see if that adds a dose of authenticity to your dialogue.

 

-Richard


 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

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Improving Dialogue

 

Start a Dialogue with Your Characters

 

676 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, writing, authentic_dialogue
1

Be original

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Apr 20, 2016

If you've followed along in previous posts, I'm sure you've made your Author's Declaration, you've established your platform priority, you've plotted out how to use your secondary planks to support your main plank, and you've become a strident believer in developing a schedule. The last bit of brand-building inventory we need to discuss is the type of content you'll be showcasing on your platform.


In this case, when I say "type," I'm referring to the origin of your content. From where will it come? If you take nothing else from these blog posts on brand building, remember this one thing: original content is king. Material that comes from you has the greatest potential to be tied to your brand. The goal is to produce something that is worthy of being shared. When it's shared on social media platforms, friends of friends and followers of followers and so forth and so on are linked back to your brand's platform. The more share-worthy material you produce, the greater the opportunity that your brand's outreach will grow.


With your commitment to scheduling, you've established half of the consistency quotient. The other half has to do with your brand’s focus. Yes, you’ll be discussing your books, but it can’t be just about your books. You have to include other passions in your brand identity too--and I do mean passions. If you're into gardening, produce original content about gardening. If politics is your thing, jump into political topics with both feet. Sports, relationships, television, theatre, or whatever captures your interest, make room for it on your platform, and do it consistently. Give your brand depth based on your passions. It's the most effective way to give your author brand staying power.


-Richard


 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

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Blogging - "Why would anyone care what I have to say?"

Setting Goals for Your Brand

 

465 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, writing, branding, brand_building, be_original
3

It took me nearly five years to get my first novel, Perfect on Paper, published, so when it finally happened I was over the moon. I'd worked my tail off to make it happen, and after all that effort, at long last I could exhale, sit back, and enjoy myself as the sales rolled in.


Or so I thought.


Needless to say, the sales didn't roll in, and I was more than a little disappointed.


I remember voicing my frustration to my editor on a phone call one day. "Why isn't my book doing better?" I asked him. While I can't remember his exact response, I'll never forget the essence of it. He calmly told me that I should write another novel, then another. He said that success wouldn't happen overnight, that it was important to build a body of work if I wanted to make a living as an author.


While they weren't what I wanted to hear at the time, I took his words to heart and soon began writing a second novel, then a third. Now I have seven, and I make a living as an author. My editor was right. It didn't happen overnight, and it happened only because I kept writing. I will always be grateful to him for his sage counsel.


Other great pieces of advice I've heard over the years include:


*If there's a story you want to tell, tell it

*To write a book, all you really need is an interesting character (or characters) who is (are) in an interesting situation--then go from there

*All major characters should want something


What is the best piece of writing advice you've ever received? Please share in the comments. I would love to hear from everyone who reads this post. Just think of how much we could all learn from one another!


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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How to Get and Stay Motivated

 

Want to write a book? Get out of your own way

965 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: author, self-publishing, writing, promotions, book_sales, writing_advice
0

Sometimes I get the feeling non-writers don't understand what writing actually is. They think it's 100% what I'm doing at this very moment: putting words to the page, digital or otherwise. Frankly, it is where I spend the least amount of time as a writer. The bulk of my writing time is spent formulating plots and developing characters as far away from my computer as I can get. It's playing and replaying a scene in my mind until the details fall into place, and I can essentially describe the scene in the form of a written passage before I've even put fingers to keyboard.

 

But in my estimation, even that time, the time spent running a story through the neuron marathon in your brain, isn't the most important part of what a writer does. For me, my best writing is done when I'm not devoting any time--be it physically writing or thinking--to a story. As much as I will deny it to my wife, I love doing the dishes. It is prime non-writing, non-thinking writing time. Trying to figure out how to load a dishwasher efficiently is a weird challenge to me that allows me to devote barely essential thoughts to a menial task and have it take up prime gray matter real estate. I'm not applying precious thought power to my latest story at all. I'm thinking of ways to insert bowls between the blunted rubberized spikes to allow for the most plates in my dishwasher. What's the best way to insert a coffee cup--handle toward the front or toward the back? This simple task is my most valuable writing time because it has zero to do with writing. By unhooking from a story, I'm allowing for the unexpected to find its way into the development of a story.

 

In essence, I'm never not writing. That is the blessing and curse of being a writer. We observe without observing. We record without recording. We unhook but remain unwittingly tethered to a project. Distractions are the unsung heroes of a writer's life.


 

-Richard


 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

You may also be interested in...The "What If" Notebook

The "What If" Notebook

 

The Power of the Mindless Task

 

648 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, writing, writing_distractions
2

Sometimes when people I encounter find out I'm an author, they share with me their own ambitions of writing a book. While some of these individuals go on to reach their goals, in my experience that's usually not the case. I've lost track of how many times an aspiring author has told me that he or she once started writing a book, but then for various reasons it went nowhere. Some of the most common explanations I hear include:


*I got too busy with work/family

 

*I wasn't sure where the plot was going

 

*I was afraid it was awful

 

*It seemed like so much work

 

*I set it down and just didn't pick it up again

 

There's absolutely nothing wrong with any of the above, but here is the truth: Yes, they are reasons, but they are also excuses. It's completely fine if you don't finish your book or even if you never start your book. No one is telling you that you must write a book. It's your life, and you should live it as you choose. But if you truly want to write a book, you're the only one who can make yourself do it. That's really all it comes down to.

 

Much like losing weight or getting (and staying) in shape, writing a book takes discipline and commitment over a long period of time. There are always going to be reasons for why you can't eat right every day or work out every day. Always. But if you really want to lose weight by eating right regularly, you will. And if you really want to be in shape be exercising regularly, you will.

 

Writing a book is challenging and scary and not always fun. And once you're done, there's no guarantee that you'll sell a single copy. But who cares? For the vast majority of authors, writing a book isn't about the money. It's about writing a book. So if you really want to be an author, get out of your own way and make it happen. I promise you'll be glad you did.

 

-Maria

 

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


 

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Writing Takes Discipline

 

Think You Can't Write a Book While Working a Full-time Job? Think Again.

 

7,787 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, author, writing, writing_a_book, excuses
0

Recently I read a story that was fairly engaging with well-developed characters. I found myself reading anxiously. You might even say it was engrossing. That is until I got to the end of the conflict. It ended abruptly, and it was resolved without warning. What's worse is that it was resolved using a solution that came out of nowhere. I read the story again to see if I had missed even the smallest hint that the resolution presented was a possibility. It wasn't. I felt cheated. There was no pathway for me to follow to the solution.


If the author had used just the tiniest bit of foreshadowing, I would have been a satisfied reader. I may have even enjoyed an "A-ha!" moment, a feeling that the outcome made perfect sense given the information I absorbed previously in the reading. Foreshadowing is an excellent plot device that helps the reader be part of the story. The trick is to not give overt indications of what's to come but to share subtle possibilities, clues that are disguised as background information.


Foreshadowing can be overdone and cross over into exposition. You run the risk of explaining plot points and spoon-feeding information to the reader, a development that will make readers feel just as cheated as springing a resolution on them out of the blue. Incorporating foreshadowing takes skill, and when it's done right, it can take a story to the next level.


Conflicts have to be resolved using logic, even in genres that are as far removed from reality as possible. Foreshadowing can give your resolution the logic it needs.


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Twist

Is Predictability in Storytelling Good or Bad?

971 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, character_development, foreshadowing
2

 

Lately I've heard so many people confuse "went" with "gone" that I decided it was worth a blog post on the topic. "Went" and "gone" are both variations of the verb "to go" but are used in different tenses. Here's an explanation of the difference:


 

WENT is the simple past tense of TO GO:


 

Yesterday I went sailing for the first time

 

Yesterday you went sailing for the first time

 

Yesterday he/she went sailing for the first time

 

Yesterday we went sailing for the first time

 

Yesterday they went sailing for the first time


 

GONE is used in the present perfect and past perfect tenses of TO GO:


 

Present perfect:

 

In the past month I have gone sailing twice

 

In the past month you have gone sailing twice

 

In the past month he/she has gone sailing twice

 

In the past month we have gone sailing twice

 

In the past month they have gone sailing twice


 

Past perfect (also known as pluperfect):

 

Before today I had gone sailing only once

 

Before today you had gone sailing only once

 

Before today he/she had gone sailing only once

 

Before today we had gone sailing only once

 

Before today they had gone sailing only once


 

I hear the mistake most often when people say "have went" when they should say "have gone." For example:


 

I should have went sailing instead of coming here (INCORRECT)

 

I should have gone sailing instead of coming here (CORRECT)

 

We could have went sailing instead of coming here (INCORRECT)

 

We could have gone sailing instead of coming here (CORRECT)


 

A clever trick for remembering the difference is to say the following out loud: "Correct answer, where have you gone?" Your ear probably knows that question is phrased correctly, so modeling it will tell you the answer.


 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


 

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Why Good Grammar Matters

 

More Grammar Pet Peeves!

 

947 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, grammar_tip, went_vs_gone
0

 

Seinfeld is an iconic TV sitcom that re-imagined the format in a lot of ways--not the least of which is that they famously and proudly proclaimed to be a show about nothing. They did an entire show about waiting for a table at a Chinese restaurant. That's barely a concept for a conversation let alone a TV show, but they pulled it off with ease.

 

The show is also famous for having an ensemble cast of four characters that were integral to every single episode. They all brought their own brand of insanity to each storyline, and the result is gold, Jerry, gold (pardon the inside Seinfeld joke). The most wonderfully insane character is Kramer, the crazy neighbor that lives across the hall from Jerry.

 

What makes him especially fascinating is that he's based on a real person whose name is Kramer. A little-known fact is that the show's co-creator, Larry David, didn't want to name the character Kramer. He thought it would open them up to legal issues, but he and Jerry Seinfeld wrote the pilot using the name Kramer until they could come up with a substitute. They even did the table read with Kramer as the character's name. The network approved the script with Kramer as the character's name. Finally, David insisted that they name the character Kessler, and they shot the pilot with Kessler living across the hall from Jerry instead of Kramer.

 

Everyone agreed the name didn't work. The character's name was Kramer. There was just no way around it. They decided to take a chance and use the name Kramer for the simple fact that no other name fit. Now, had they written the original script with the name Kessler, maybe it would have worked. But as it was, there was no escaping the allure of Kramer.

 

The lesson is be careful of those names you use as placeholders. They can inhabit characters and prevent you from changing the names when you do your rewrite. Whether we realize it or not, we associate certain characteristics and behaviors with names, and we subconsciously include those various traits when we write. That's not necessarily a bad thing, unless the time comes that you want to make a change. Then, you might find it difficult to do so.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Building Character

 

The Basic Elements of a Character Arc

 

816 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_names
2

I recently happened upon an interesting marketing idea that I wanted to share with readers of my blog. For a limited time the print version of one of my books was for sale on Amazon at a significant discount over the normal list price, so a good friend of mine, who is also a huge fan of my books, sent out an email to about 30 of her friends encouraging them to buy it. She also copied me on the email.


 

One of the recipients (I'll call her Annie) replied directly to me and told me that she'd already read the book but would love to buy signed copies for 10 of her friends. Would that be possible, she asked. I live in New York and she lives in California, so we decided that the easiest way to handle things would be for her to order the books on Amazon and have them shipped directly to me. She emailed me a list of names for the inscriptions, and once I received the books I signed them and mailed them to her in a single box. Using the media mail rate, sending 10 books didn't cost much at all--I believe it was only around six dollars--so I was more than happy to do it.


 

Normally when fans want to buy one or two signed copies, I sell them directly (I have a stash in my living room). I also charge more than the list price to cover my own costs, not to mention the time it takes me to go to the post office and wait in line. In this case, however, it was more important to me to get my books in the hands of 10 new readers than to make a little extra money. If those readers enjoy the book and tell their friends...well you know how that works!

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


 

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Marketing Tip: Offer to Send a Book

Marketing Tip: Encourage Your Fans to Spread the Word

 

1,051 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, writing, promotions, signed_copies
1

 

I would like to announce that I'm totally dedicating myself to improving my craft. I am going to spend every waking hour I have sitting in my office and tapping away on my keyboard. Every waking hour! Writing is all I will think about. I'm serving my family notice. No more phone calls. No more holidays together. And to my friends, stop inviting me to parties, and no, I don't want to go to dinner and a movie. Poker nights? Canceled. I have writing to do. You all can have a life. My life is the written word and only the written word.

 

Of course, now that I think about it, I get a lot of my inspiration from my friends and family. Those "out-of-the-blue" moments that writers like me live for normally happen when I'm not in my office, sitting behind my computer, honing my craft. They mostly happen when I'm laughing it up during a night of poker or spending time catching up with family. The ideas that mean the most to me are the ones that seemingly find me by accident, in a moment that is far removed from the physical act of writing.

 

Okay, new plan. I'm going to have balance between my writing life and my personal life because they are so closely tied together that they are essentially the same thing. I write because I have a life outside of writing. One cannot write in a vacuum. You have to be surrounded by people and partake in activities that engage your humanity. If you do that, your writing can't help but improve.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Embracing Inspiration from Real-Life Moments

 

Life Outside of Writing

 

1,169 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, improving_your_craft
0

 

Recently a friend of mine came over for a visit, and as we were chatting he noticed a short book sitting on my coffee table. I explained that an indie author had sent it to me in hopes that I might enjoy it enough to promote it in some way. My friend picked up the book and began leafing through it, then looked up at me and asked, "What's up with the weird formatting? This looks like a Word document."

 

All I could do was shrug and say, "That happens a lot with self-published books."

 

The "weird formatting" that caught my friend's attention included the following:

 

  • The book was double-spaced, both within paragraphs and between them
  • The first chapter started on page 17

These issues made the book look amateur, almost like a pamphlet. My friend doesn't know anything about publishing, but he does know what books usually look like, and the irregularities made a negative impression on him because they just didn't look right. The book in question had other problems in addition to the formatting, namely a ton of grammatical errors, but to the casual reader those are less obvious. Formatting issues are always obvious. If your book doesn't look like the ones found on the shelves of a bookstore, people are going to notice.

 

Uploading your book to a self-publishing platform may be free, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't spend money getting the manuscript in shape. If you aren't familiar with formatting programs, hire a professional to do it for you. Otherwise you risk turning off readers on the very first page, regardless of how good the actual content of your book may be. And if that happens, you probably aren't going to sell very many copies.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

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Three Mistakes to Avoid When Self-publishing a Print Book

 

Going Indie? Don't Skimp on Quality

 

1,410 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, formatting, writing
0

 

If   you've got a vacation on the calendar this year, might I suggest you make it a working vacation? Not an ugly work vacation, but a fun, author's work vacation. Use the opportunity to make contacts in the area to help expand your network and grow your brand. Here are a few suggestions on organizations to contact. Note: Contact them at least four to six weeks before your visit. Definitely don't wait until the day before you are scheduled to leave.

 

  1. Local Artists Associations: Even smallish communities today have associations dedicated to promoting local artists. While it's true these organizations normally cater to the needs of local artists, they may be open to working with you in finding contacts to do various local signings. You could even organize a mini book tour in art galleries in the area
  2. Visitors Center: If you're about to visit a town that thrives on tourism, chances are they have a visitors center that would be happy to share information with you. They can provide you with information on various hot spots for the literary minded. They may even have names of businesses that would be interested in hosting a book signing. At the very least, they will have a calendar of events in their area that may include festivals and trade fairs where you can set up a table with your book
  3. Libraries: Libraries don't just house books for patrons to check out and read. They host events for writers and readers of all stripes. They are looking for ways to bring people into their facilities. What better way than to host a reading from a visiting author?
  4. Writers Groups: No matter the size of the community you'll be visiting, I'm willing to bet it is home to a writers group or two. Any of the previous organizations might be able to point you in the right direction, or you could contact theaters in the area to find out if they have open workshops for playwrights. It's always good to make contacts with other writers. Since you'll be visiting the area anyway, you might as well make new friends who share your passion for writing and books.

 

Vacations aren't just great for relaxing. If you're an author, they are a perfect opportunity to get your face out there and expand your brand in the real world.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Social Networking Sells Your Brand

 

Find Advocates with Free Books

 

 

 

 

874 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, author, self-publishing, writing, promotions, branding, author_tips
0

 

The other day I received a call from my friend Kristen, who recently opened her own business in the wedding-planning industry. She remembered that close friends of mine had recently been featured in the Vows section of the New York Times, and she wanted to know if an introduction to the reporter who wrote the piece would be possible.

 

While I'm still working on getting that contact for Kristen, I was impressed by her willingness to reach out to her network in order to help promote her business. As she and I were chatting, I thought of an indie author I knew who had published a book about lessons learned over 50 years of marriage, so I offered to put Kristen in touch with her to explore possible joint-marketing opportunities. Who knows what their conversation might lead to, but it got me thinking. What if that indie author reached out to her network in the same targeted (and personalized) way that Kristen had done to me? What introductions might that lead to? What doors might it open?

 

While there are some fundamental steps for promoting a book that you can (and should) take, such as creating an author page on Amazon, writing a compelling book description, etc., there's no magic formula for success. Much of book marketing is doing everything and anything you can think of to try to spread the word, seeing what works and what doesn't, and repeating whatever works--over and over.

 

However small it may be, all of us have a network, so chances are you have friends or colleagues who know people who could be helpful in your efforts to promote your book. Why not ask them? You never know what might happen, and it sure can't hurt to try.

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

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Tips for Networking with Other Authors

The Power of a Personal Connection

 

846 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, marketing_tip
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Not  long ago, I completed my most detailed pre-first-draft outline of a  novel that I've ever written. When I say detailed, I mean detailed. It's  just shy of 30,000 words long. I know that sounds crazy, right? I never  would have pegged me as the type of writer to do something so  comprehensive, but I did, and I have to tell you it feels really, really  good. I'm now writing the first draft, and the outline is making it  incredibly simple to move forward. There will be a rewrite for sure.  Perhaps more than one, and each step forward will pull me further and  further away from the outline, but having such an exhaustively  constructed foundation to work with from the start is liberating.

 

I'll  let you in on a secret. Creating the outline wasn't that difficult.  Here are the steps I took to construct it. I realize it's not the  approach everyone would take, but it worked for me.

 

  1. Overview: I crafted a one-sentence description of the main theme of the story.
  2. Framework:  I examined other books in the genre to get an average chapter count. It  sounds a bit simplistic, but that's essentially what I was going for. I  wanted a simple framework as a starting point. Having a target total  chapter count gave me that starting point.
  3. Chapter Ideas:  Starting with chapter one and working chronologically, I wrote a brief  description of each chapter. Not all descriptions were even complete  sentences. I just jotted down the main points of the chapter and moved  on to the next.
  4. Chapter Concepts: With my chapter descriptions in hand, I expanded them and turned each of them into complete, 50-word thoughts.
  5. Chapter Descriptions: The last step was taking those 50-word thoughts for each chapter and turning them into 250-word chapter descriptions.

 

And  that's it, my five steps to developing an incredibly detailed outline.  This process allowed me to think about and grow my story in six  different stages, the sixth being the actual writing of the first draft.  I have never known a story so well before I've written it, and I can't  wait to get to it every day. I am sold on creating detailed outlines  before starting to write a novel.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Time to Outline

The Post-Draft Outline

1,357 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, outline
2

For some reason that I have yet to uncover, over the past week I've received several emails that all say more or less the same thing. Here are snippets of three of them:


Dear Maria Murnane, I have recently come across your book, Wait for the Rain, available on Audible and on Amazon, and due to both its quality and plot, it qualifies to be promoted in our community of readers.


Hi Maria, I hope you don't mind me reaching out, but I wanted to say that I think your book would be well received with our subscribers. We were wondering if you'd like to be featured in our newsletter.


Good day, I discovered your book online and wanted to invite you to promote it alongside other similar authors.


Each of these "communities," which I imagine is nothing more than a massive list of email addresses, claims to have tens--if not hundreds--of thousands of "subscribers" who are eager for new books to read. The prices the sales reps quoted were all around $20 to be "featured," whatever that means.


I declined to participate in any of the offers because they seemed to me like a waste of money. But in spite of that, I couldn't help but wonder if maybe I should have tried just one to see what would happen. Then I realized I could ask the many readers of this blog to chime in with their own experiences, so that's why I'm throwing it out to you. For those of you who have tried one of these email blast services, do they work? Is $20 to reach 100,000 potential readers a good idea? Do these lists actually generate sales? Or are they a huge rip-off?


Please share your experiences in the comments section below. While I'm unable to respond, I look forward to reading them and hope to get a productive discussion going!


-Maria


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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


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