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753 Posts tagged with the writing tag
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Free your mind, and the first draft will follow. And once you have your first draft, you'll almost be ready to write your novel. Let me be clear, the first draft of your book is not your book. It's the blueprint for the outline you will use to write the second draft of your novel. That second draft is what you will hone and rewrite until it becomes the file you upload into a publishing system and make available for sale.

 

If this sounds like a lot of work, that's because it is. I've tried every way you can think of to get around the laborious rewrite process, but it is unavoidable from my standpoint. Is it mandatory? No, of course not, but it is highly recommended. I understand not all writers do it. One of my favorite authors, Erskine Caldwell, famously submitted the first and only draft of his manuscripts for publication.

 

I've grown to love outlines, and I've found them to be most helpful as a blueprint if I wait and create them after I've completed a first draft. I've come to view the first draft as my very detailed idea. Developing an outline based on that idea only makes sense.

 

When I say outline, I mean I write a short description of each chapter. That description usually consists of one line describing the character arc in that chapter and another line that explains the story arc of the chapter. Seeing the book in parts helps me see the best way to make it one cohesive unit and give it consistency.

 

If you've never written off of an outline, I'd urge you to try it--but only after you've written your first draft.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Perils of Rewriting

After the First Draft

1,220 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, writers, writing, drafts, outlines
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I've said countless times in this blog that if you want to get people to read your book, you have to give away a lot of copies. To reviewers. To bloggers. To the editor of your college alumni magazine. To the women in your yoga class. To the guy who cuts your hair. To the people you meet at Starbucks. Basically to anyone and everyone you think might like the book enough to spread the word about it.

 

That can be a lot of books. But you have to do it!

 

I always recommend giving away print copies with a personalized inscription for two reasons. First, because it's classy. Second, because it's harder for someone to "forget" to read a (signed) physical book than an eBook buried in a Kindle library.

 

How to save money

 

If you're going to mail signed copies, use the book rate at the post office. It's almost half the price! The one downside is that you have to wait in line because the self-service kiosks don't offer the book rate, but it's worth it to save so much money.

 

To give away eBooks, I recommend "gifting" a copy via Amazon. All you need is the email address associated with the recipient's Amazon account. Click "Give as a Gift," type in a personal note before sending, and you're done! And guess what? You get the royalties on the sale, which brings the purchase price down.

 

Note: Multiple indie authors who read my blog have contacted me offering to email me a "free PDF" version of their book. You know what that does? It makes me feel like they want my endorsement, but not enough to (pay to) send me a real book. Not the best approach, in my opinion.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Marketing Tip: Always Carry a Book with You

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

1,438 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, promotions, signed_copies, free_copies
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I'm going to commit a literary faux paus today and discuss an element of story in a different medium, one that traditionally is not met with favor among novelists. That medium is television. Now, in case you just groaned and rolled your eyes, let me explain that today's television programming is varied and much grittier than it once was. There's a lot of high quality narrative writing at nearly every stop on the dial or phone app or streaming service, however television is consumed these days.

 

The show I want to talk about, Breaking Bad, ended its run a few years ago, but it's one of my favorites. I've said repeatedly that watching that series from beginning to end is like taking a Master's class in character development for any type of storyteller. Walter White, the protagonist, may be one of the most fully realized characters I've ever encountered, but I want to talk about another character, the villain, Gustavo "Gus" Fring.

 

Gus is menacing. He's stoic. He's brutal. He's duplicitous. He's everything you want in a villain and more. The creators of the show did something brilliant with Gus' villainy. They hid it under a cool exterior that could even be soft at times. I think he yelled once during the entire time he was on the show. He did bad things, but he did them in an almost businesslike manner. The creators allowed you to see his tragic past and witness what turned him down the psychopathic road. They gave you a reason to root for him. They managed to make you feel uneasy about him and sympathetic toward him at the same time. It helped that his nemesis was a somewhat volatile good guy that you weren't always sure was the good guy.

 

So, today's Breaking Bad lesson is that your bad guy has to be just as complicated as your protagonist. Yes, he's the heavy, but that doesn't mean you skimp on his dimensions. Find something that will give the readers pause, where they may even find themselves hoping he (or she) survives.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Basic Elements of a Character Arc

Taking a Character from Good to Bad

1,161 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: novel, author, writing, characters, storytelling, character_development, character_arc, writing_characters, villians, scene_writing
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Imagine you're at a cocktail party and someone tells a brief story about his friend Buddy. Chances are the storyteller will name Buddy just once and use "he" from there on because everyone listening to the story knows he's talking about Buddy. If the storyteller were to say, "Buddy did this, and then Buddy did that, and then Buddy went there," it would sound weird, right?

 

The same goes for books. Read the following two paragraphs out loud. Which one sounds more natural to you?

 

EXAMPLE A

 

Buddy arrived at the office brimming with confidence, knowing today was his day to shine and show the world his potential. Buddy strode toward the interview room with a spring in his step. "I can do this," Buddy said under his breath as he reached for the doorknob.

 

EXAMPLE B

 

Buddy arrived at the office brimming with confidence, knowing today was his day to shine and show the world his potential. He strode toward the interview room with a spring in his step. "I can do this," he said under his breath as he reached for the doorknob.

 

Example A makes me want to put the book down. Example B makes me want to keep reading.

 

I just finished reading an indie novel in which the author used the main character's name (I'll also call him "Buddy") over and over and over when a simple "he" would have done. The story was interesting, but the overuse of "Buddy" was so distracting (and annoying) that it undermined the reading experience for me and will prevent me from recommending the book to others. A professional editor can help flag these problems before your book goes to market, so if you're going the indie route, I strongly recommend hiring one.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Two Mistakes Indie Authors Should Avoid

A Wonderful Example of How to Handle Constructive Criticism and Feedback

2,999 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, pronouns
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Do You Need Swag?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 19, 2015

When I first got into indie publishing, I had to deal with a huge learning curve. I knew writing. I had been doing it for a couple of decades before I released my first title. The part I didn't know was what to do with a book once it's written, so I went on a self-taught publishing journey to find out how authors sell books. I got into blogging to support book sales. I tried personal videos to support book sales. I dove into social media to support book sales. I was building a platform. Then I went to Book Expo America, and I saw something I didn't expect to see in the literary world. I saw swag.

 

I wandered the floors of the convention hall, and I saw tote bags sporting images of book covers. I saw T-shirts. I saw magnets. I saw pens. I saw ties. I saw things at Erotica booths that I can't even mention. It blew my mind. Publishers and authors were giving stuff away by the truckload to help get the word out about their books.

 

I had a signing at some point during the show, and I sat next to an author who had boxes of this swag that she gave away with each book she signed. I had nothing, and I actually started to feel like I was shortchanging the people who got signed copies of my book. For the rest of the convention, I continually saw that author's name on a tote bag somewhere in the enormous facility. I even saw one of her ties on the streets of New York a few days later.

 

Swag works. Do you need it? Not necessarily, but if you've got a signing coming up, do yourself a favor, and bring some items with your name and book's title on it to give away. People eat that stuff up, and you may get some free advertising out of it.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Grassroots Marketing Ripple Effect

The Marketing Maze

925 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, book_signing, promotions, swag
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In my last post, I said that for the overwhelming majority of authors, it's important to make an effort to connect with your fans. The same goes for having a good headshot. If you're selling millions of copies of your books each year, no need to read further.

 

Almost daily I receive an email from an author asking me a variation of the same question: "How do I market my book?" For those who have websites or author pages on Amazon (two things I've recommended in previous posts), I almost always look them up to see if I might want to interview them for a blog post, to check out their books, etc. And you know what? Nine out of ten times I cringe at the headshot because it looks so unprofessional. If your headshot looks like it was taken at Sears in the 1970s or cropped out of a group photo at a barbeque, it's time to get a new one.

 

If you're going to present yourself to the world as a professional writer, you need to look professional. Speaking engagements are a perfect example--put yourself in the shoes of a person deciding between two author candidates with roughly the same qualifications. Would you choose the guy in the flower shirt holding a spatula, or the woman in the tasteful suit sitting next to an elegant vase filled with flowers? They say you can't judge a book by its cover, but we all know everyone does.

 

Contrary to popular belief, a headshot doesn't have to cost a lot of money--or any money. I bartered for a recent one with a woman I met at a business networking group who needed some help editing her website. I got what I needed, and she got what she needed, a win-win!

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Lights, Camera, Smile!

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

1,238 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, headshots
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How to Be Retweetable

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 12, 2015

Before social media the goal of an author was to write something memorable. It's still the goal today, but there's the added goal of writing something retweetable. Twitter is a mecca of viral content just waiting to be shared via retweet over and over again. The trick is writing something in 140 characters that moves your followers and their followers to retweet your content.

 

Here are some good rules of thumb to craft retweetable content and build your brand across the Twitterverse.

 

  1. You don't really have 140 characters: If you're using up all the characters allotted in a tweet, you're not allowing for followers to add their own two cents. You'd be surprised how many want to add their points of view to a message. If you can come in at 70-100 characters, your message is all the more retweetable.

  2. Pick your spots: According to Track Maven, Tuesday and Wednesday are the days with the highest volume of tweets, but weekends are where the largest number of retweets occur. The point? Your followers will be more likely to see your tweets during the week, but on weekends there's a greater likelihood that a smaller number or your followers will retweet your content and share it outside of your network, exposing your brand to a larger number of people.

  3. #usehashtags: Hashtags do get you retweeted, and the more you use, the more likely it is you'll be retweeted. A lot of people limit them or avoid them altogether, but there are a number of studies that say three to five hashtags in a tweet increases your chances of being retweeted.

  4. Three words that will greatly increase your retweet volume: By simply putting, "Please Retweet Now" in your tweet, you will see a marked increase in the number of retweets you receive.

 

Of course, the best way to receive a lot of retweets is to take advantage of the social aspect of Twitter and engage with followers, so they are more likely to support your career as an author, and make sure it's a two-way street. Support their dreams, too.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Twitter: A Global Tool That's Great for Connecting with Your Local Media

Can Twitter Make You a Better Writer?

1,250 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, promotion, writing, twitter, retweet, retweetable
1

It's a question that doesn't produce a consensus. It's probably even foolish to explore, but that sort of thing has never stopped me before. Let's face it, what makes a book readable has a lot to do with individual tastes. There have been enormous bestsellers that I have found painfully unreadable, and there have been obscure titles that have gained no popular traction that I have devoured over and over again.

 

So, beyond personal proclivities, what makes a book readable? Yes, character development is a huge consideration. Story structure is pivotal. Setting matters a great deal. But they all pale in comparison to one often overlooked element to a book's readability factor: the writer's passion for the story. A reader can tell when a writer approaches a piece out of a sense of obligation instead of a sense of desire. It's obvious in the language used. There is a nuanced, invisible connectedness between author and story that etches itself into the pages (paper or electronic) when the writer approaches the story from a place of passion. Readers pick up on that. They gravitate toward it. They want to be a part of it.

 

Writing without passion is probably not something a lot of indie writers have to deal with. But if you sit down to write and the passion isn't there, walk away. Divert your attention toward something that brings you joy. Find a headspace that opens you up to feeling, a hunger to tell your story and get back at it. Write with passion.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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When to Walk Away from a Story

Change it Up!

3,577 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: writing, draft, craft, book_writing, indie_authors, author_advice, story_writing, novel_writing
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Have you ever finished a great book and thought to yourself, I would love to send a note to the author, only to find yourself at a loss for how to do so? In my opinion, by not including contact information at the end of their books, those authors are missing out on a wonderful opportunity to connect with their readers.

 

Here are some other things you can include in your books to connect with your readers:

 

1)   The first chapter of your next book:

Including the first chapter of another book, whether it's a sequel or an entirely different story, is a great way to both alert your readers to its existence and to encourage them to buy it right then and there. If you don't have another book ready, why not include a brief note about something you have planned or have already begun?

 

2)   A sense of your personality in the acknowledgements:

I'm always a little disappointed when the acknowledgments page of a book is nothing more than a list of names. In addition to thanking people in this section, you can share a little bit about yourself with your readers. It doesn't have to be anything overly personal, but there's no harm in offering your fans a glimpse of who you are, how hard you worked to write the book, and how much you appreciate anyone out there who is actually reading it.

 

3)   Your website and/or newsletter information:

I absolutely love receiving emails from fans, so I put my website (www.mariamurnane.com) and/or email address everywhere I can. On my website there's a "Contact" button that provides my email address (maria@mariamurnane.com). I also have a "Sign up for Maria's newsletter!" button on every page of my site.

 

Granted, there are some authors out there who are so successful they don't need to interact with their readers to sell more books, but the rest of us should be doing everything we can to establish a connection with our fans. Word-of-mouth is the most powerful sales tool in the world, so anything you can to do to engage with your readers is well worth your time.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Tips for Engaging Your Readers Online

Book Marketing Tip: Make It Easy for Your Fans to Help You

3,751 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions
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You aren't just an indie author. You are the head of a community. You have a responsibility to cultivate and grow your group. Here are five points to ponder as you examine your role as head of your online community.

 

  1. I get by with a little help from my friends: Your online community isn't a fan base. At least they shouldn't be treated like fans. They are your friends. They are supportive, responsive, and happy for you. You should treat them in kind.
  2. Community and culture: Every community on the planet has its own culture. Your online community of readers is no different. Since you are the founder and manager of your community, you have a sacred duty to identify that culture and develop parameters for engagement that won't diminish it. As an author, your culture is likely to be tied in large part to your preferred genre, but your sense of humor and personal belief system will also come into play.
  3. If you're not engaged, your community isn't engaged: If you let comments go without a response, you won't get many comments. People want to have a discussion. Give them what they want, and let them know they are being heard. Engage, engage, engage.
  4. Community outreach: Participate in other communities and allow other authors with their own communities to piggyback off your success. You need a community of readers, first and foremost. Those can be found by connecting with other authors. Remember, authors don't compete with other authors for readers. Readers devour books like potato chips. There are more than enough of both to go around.
  5. Manage squabbles: I have found that sometimes even the most innocent of comments can be misconstrued and escalated into hurt feelings. You have a responsibility that disagreements in your community are kept below fever pitch. Lively conversation and debate is not just okay, it can be a good thing, but watch closely so lines don't get crossed. When things get personal, draw the line and insert civility. Sometimes all it takes is a voice of reason to end a dispute.

 

Essentially, your goal is to grow your community to the point that it's so large it can't be handled by one person. That's when you'll have one of those problems that's nice to have.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

 

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Community Engagement Prompts

Selling Others Sells Yourself

2,966 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: marketing, selling, promotion, writing, community, online, social_media, outreach, marketing_strategy, author_advice
16

No matter who publishes your book, there's no guarantee that libraries will carry it. However, if you walk into your local library with a smile and a copy of your book and say, "Hi there! I wrote this book. Will you please carry it?" there's a good chance the answer will be "Sure." It can't hurt to ask, right? The worst the librarian can do is say no, and as I explained in a previous post, if you let a few NOs drag you down, you're not going to get very far in your book marketing efforts.

 

I live in New York, but I recently received an invitation to an event at the library in my hometown in California. And get this--it's a reception for local authors to meet local readers! How cool is that? For all I know, my novels have never even been checked out there, but their mere presence on the shelves resulted in an invitation. Maybe your local library is planning a similar event. You never know! Again, it can't hurt to ask. (And if your library isn't planning a similar event, why not suggest one?)

 

Another idea is to ask your friends or family members who live in different towns to walk into their local libraries and make a request for your book. If a card-carrying member of a library requests a specific book, the librarian will most likely order it. It's true! When I was writing my first novel, I remember telling my mom that if just one person I wasn't related to read it, I would be thrilled. I got confirmation that this had happened when my uncle, who lives in Indiana, requested that his local library carry the book. When he went back a few weeks later to check it out, someone had beat him to it! I have no idea who that first reader was, but I will never forget the wonderful moment when I found out he/she existed.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Three Easy Marketing Ideas

Avoid this Marketing No-No

1,890 Views 16 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, libraries
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Years ago I got into a discussion with some folks about what makes a young adult novel a young adult novel. It was sparked by a panel at a conference taking on the topic, and what I discovered is that there is no real consensus on the matter. Every element supposedly exclusive to young adult material was eventually discovered to exist in adult titles, and the reverse was true.

 

So given that there are no rules for young adult novels written in stone, let's examine three--let's call them observations--uncovered in that discussion. Invariably, there are exceptions to each item in the list to follow, but that's okay. This is just a jumping off point.

 

  1. Coming-of-age element: Young adult novels usually cover a rite of passage. That is to say the main character moves into a new stage of life that brings him/her closer to adulthood. We call these coming-of-age stories, and while the stage in question may be something as innocent as experiencing a first kiss, the obstacles overcome and the lessons learned on their way to that first kiss are the crux of the story.

  2. Hope: More so than in adult themed novels, hope seems to be an ever-present theme in most young adult novels. As bad as things get, even dystopian bad, the main character always finds a way to win. The message consistently seems to be to never give up. Victory is just a miracle away.

  3. Avoiding trends: When an adult writes a book for a young adult market, the temptation is to learn the slang of the day and try to speak their language, but the young adult novels that stand the test of time, by and large, don't jump on language trends. Doing so appears as if the author is trying too hard to relate to the readers, and it just doesn't work.

 

Those are the observations that came up in my discussion. What say you? What do you think is unique to a young adult novel or key to a young adult novel's long-term success?

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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What is a Young Adult Novel?

Claim Your Genre

1,223 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, young_adult
1

I love horror stories in every medium. My Saturday morning ritual while I'm vegging out, sipping on my life-giving coffee, is to watch a horror movie. It goes without saying that as a writer, Stephen King is one of my idols. He's the master of horror for a reason. Being scared is just fun. There's no other way to describe it. As a student of all things horror, here are the five things I've observed about a good horror story:

 

  1. Relatable protagonist: Horror stories work best when your central character is recognizable. He or she should face the same sort of everyday struggles and triumphs that the readers face. What the protagonist does for a living doesn't necessarily have to be a typical job, but the way he or she approaches that job should be the same way a majority of people approach a job. The readers should be able to see themselves in the protagonist.

  2. Clearly defined main conflict: You don't want your readers guessing what's so terrifying about your horror story. They should know why they're terrified. Keep your monster in the shadows if you wish, but make the consequences of coming face-to-face with your monster crystal clear.

  3. You can't have horror without suspense: While knowing the possible consequences of meeting your monster is important, the anticipation of doom might be more relevant to a horror story than the actual doom itself. Investigating those things that go bump in the night can offer more thrills than uncovering what those things truly are. Think about it, there is a certain amount of exhilaration in not knowing who or what the monster is. Keeping the who, what, why, and where a mystery for as long as you can is good edge-of-your-seat storytelling.

  4. Out of their element: Good protagonists have to be out of their league and overmatched in order to make the conclusion satisfying. Whatever the outcome of your horror story, the reader needs to feel that the central character worked to earn a victory. Without that struggle, there's no reason to root for him or her.

  5. The horror still exists: The best horror stories end with the reader thinking that the horror is still out there. The protagonist may have won the battle, but the war still wages on. You don't necessarily have to set up a sequel, but horror fans read horror novels because they like being scared. If you can find a way to scare them with your ending, you've written a horror masterpiece.

 

Are you a fan of horror? What are the elements of horror that draw you in and keep you entertained?

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Cost and Odds of Suspense

How to Be a Genre Bender

1,855 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: horror, writing, suspense, genre, writing_tips, writing_advice, author_advice, page_turner
24

I'm always looking for ideas for this blog (as well as a good book to read), so I spend a chunk of my day keeping tabs on the publishing industry. Often when I stumble across an article about a new author, especially a new indie author, I head to Amazon to check out the book and the author's page. Who knows? I may buy the book or even contact the author about a possible interview.

 

If I see grammatical errors in an author page, however, I quickly move on.

 

For example, I recently visited the Amazon page of an author whose bio included the following mistakes (specifics changed to protect the author's identity):

 

What she wrote: Lisa Sue is the Author of five mysteries.

 

What she should have written: Lisa Sue is the author of five mysteries.

 

What she wrote: Her favorite topic's are X, Y and Z.

 

What she should have written: Her favorite topics are X, Y and Z.

 

What she wrote: Lisa Sue is a woman that has always worked hard for what she wants.

 

What she should have written: Lisa Sue is a woman who has always worked hard for what she wants.

 

I've said it countless times in this blog, but you only have quick moment to grab a (potential) reader's attention. If the impression you give is that you don't understand the basic rules of grammar, the potential reader is probably not going to buy your book, no matter how good it is. Perhaps the above author was in a hurry when she wrote her bio and didn't notice the mistakes, but to an educated reader the errors are distracting and unprofessional.

 

Think of your author bio the way you would your book's cover. People shouldn't judge your book based on it, but many will.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Common Mistakes a Professional Editor Sees

Grammar Tip: She vs. Her/He vs. Him

4,223 Views 24 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, grammar, author_bio, grammatical_errors
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It has occurred to me lately that building a brand is a lot like dating. When you are in the midst of a courtship, you put your best foot forward. You enhance your strengths, downplay your weaknesses, and you work at being engaging. You are constantly looking for ways to keep the conversation lively and maybe even enlightening. You want the person you're courting to find you interesting--so interesting that they keep agreeing to see you in order to engage in more lively and enlightening conversation.

 

So, in addition to being a writer, your job as an author is to be interesting. Frankly, that's bad news for me because I'm boring. Terribly so. Mind-numbingly so. I have a risk-averse personality that prevents me from attempting dangerous stunts or hobbies. I abhor the nightlife. I can't even stand large crowds. Red carpets, galas, grandiose events: I'm not a fan. So, what's an author like me to do to be interesting enough to be a brand?

 

Well, the only thing I can do: go with the flow. I have hobbies and interests. I like photography. I enjoy football. I love attending local live theater. I even have causes such as supporting animal shelters. So, while I'm not a fascinating person, I find certain things in life fascinating and worth my attention. Those are the things I build my brand around. I share my thoughts on those things with my community. And, hopefully, my passion for them is what makes me interesting.

 

Your lifestyle might not be flashy, but that doesn't mean you're not interesting. How you express your zeal for those things that are important to you makes you interesting enough to be a brand.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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