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Distractions. They're so…distracting. They can be a writer's worst enemy. Here are three ways to help you avoid them and get you on the road to finishing your novel.


  1. Unplug from the Internet. Social media, while an invaluable resource to build an author brand, is also a huge time killer. Checking Facebook or Twitter or any of the other half-dozen sites for updates can become addictive. You have to make a contract with yourself that when it's writing time, it's not time to compulsively check social media. It's a hard contract to keep, but it gets easier over time.
  2. Reward yourself with distractions. I know that sounds a bit counterintuitive, but hear me out. Give yourself a word count goal for the day. Make it fairly significant. Now, divide that count into four smaller goals. When each goal is met throughout the day, allow yourself a distraction for 10 or 15 minutes. You choose which kind. It doesn't matter. This type of reward system can spur you along and keep you more focused.
  3. Schedule around distractions. Michael Crichton used to? wake up at four in the morning to start his writing day. There aren't a lot of distractions at that time in the morning--nothing ongoing at any rate. If mornings aren't your thing, take your chances with a late, late night schedule. While this strategy is a bit more extreme, if you have kids, this may be the only one available to you that makes sense.

 


Whatever method you use to rid your life of distractions, practice it with regularity so it becomes a habit that will make those distractions less…distracting.


-Richard

 


 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Being Online = Not Writing

 

Is the Early Bird More Creative?

 


 


1,041 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, publishing, writing, overcoming_distractions, distractions
1

Last fall I had an interesting encounter with an indie author, and it inspired me to write a post for this space. At the time of our meeting he gave me a little postcard about the book he had written, so after I finished the blog I fished out the postcard so I could send him a link. The postcard, however, didn't have any contact information, so I went to Amazon to find his email address or website link on his author page. Unfortunately, he didn't have an author page, so I did a search to see if he had a website. Again, nothing. All I could find was the listing for his book, so I included that in my post. Not knowing what else to do, I moved on to my next blog topic.


 

The other day I received an email from him. Somehow he'd stumbled across the blog post and wanted to let me know how thrilled he was about it. I was thrilled too, because I'd felt bad that I hadn't been able to reach him.


 

Are you easy to find online? Take my experience and extrapolate to a much larger stage. Let's say that instead of just writing a post about this man, I'd wanted to invite him to speak to an audience of hundreds--or even thousands. Or what if I'd wanted to order a large amount of signed copies of his book? Or what if I'd wanted to interview him on TV?

 

 

If you don't have an author website, at the very least you should have an author page on Amazon. (Here's how to set one up.) There you can write a little blurb about yourself--and include your email address!

 

 

 

To give you an example of an Amazon author page, here's mine. It's a simple, easy way for your readers to find (and contact!) you, so take advantage of it. You never know who might be looking for you!


 

-Maria


 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.


 

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A Few Reasons to Have a Website

 

Marketing Tip--Business Cards

 

 

 

 

1,261 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotion, writing, internet_presence
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Today I pose a question, while at the same time issuing a challenge. Conflict, I have always been taught, is the foundation of fiction. You can't have a story without it. It helps move a plot along. It helps develop characters. It is the only way to reach a resolution--actually, it is the reason a resolution is necessary.

 

 

Again, this is what I've been taught. I've just taken it as fact that conflict-free fiction is impossible because people I admire say it's a fact. I had also been taught that a well-defined plot is essential to a successful novel, but then I discovered Erskine Caldwell, and I fell in love with a writing style that places plot on the backburner. Its only purpose is to give his characters a fertile garden in which to grow. Plot in Caldwell's case doesn't need to be well-defined.

 

 

Now, Caldwell includes plenty of conflict in his novels, but his de-emphasis on plot has me wondering if one could do the same with conflict? Can you write a novel with little to no conflict? Is there a way to drive and advance a storyline without the give and take conflict provides. I've studied the question from every angle, and my conclusion is that it can't be done. Conflict is the one element of story that can't be sacrificed in the name of style in order to write a compelling and sellable novel.

 

 

So, here's my question and my challenge. Am I wrong? Can you write a story devoid of conflict? If so, I challenge you to show me the way. I'd love to see it and learn something new.

 

 

-Richard

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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What Comes after the Conflict?

 

The Three Endings

 

 

 

 

877 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, conflict, character_development
2

The word of the day is "portable." It's a word you wouldn't think has much to do with the marketing world, but it's a concept that fits with the way people communicate today. Whether it's social media or texting, people are primarily using volleys of short messages to communicate. If you want your book to be part of that conversation you have to develop a marketing message that is portable enough to fit into this environment.


Today, more than ever, the one-sentence book description is essential to spreading the word about your book. Impossible, you say? There's just no way you can convey the complexity of your multi-layered story into one sentence, you insist? I'm here to tell you it can and must be done, and you do it by ignoring the complexity of your story. You want to concentrate on the main theme and the main theme only. Forget all the layers but one--the surface.


What is your story's hook? What was the "What if" question that compelled you to start writing? That is what you will build your portable marketing message around. The intricacies of character don't matter. A hint of a possible plot twist doesn't matter. There are only two things that you want to make clear in your one-sentence description: the main plot and the genre. Identifying the genre in such a small window may prove to be tricky, but it's just a matter of finding the right adjectives.


To be frank, making your marketing message portable enough to fit into today's world of texting, tweeting, and updating isn't easy, but it is well worth the time and the effort. Be concise. Be informative. Be portable.

 

 

 

-Richard

 

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

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Grab Readers' Attention with Your Hook

 

I'm Sure Your Book Is Wonderful, But Don't Tell Me So

 

 

 

 

1,050 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, publishing, writing, media, promotions, social, hook, marketing_ideas, marketing_strategy, writing_tips, marketing_advice
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I receive a lot of emails from authors who read this blog, and by far their biggest reason for getting in touch is to express how discouraged they feel about their book sales. To let all you know that you're not alone, I thought I'd share a personal story.


A couple weeks ago I received a text message from one of my best girlfriends. I won't quote it directly, but in it she said that she was embarrassed to tell me that she'd finally read my sixth book, which came out a year and a half ago.


I had to laugh at her message. You know why? Because I dedicated the book to her. She even came to one of my launch parties and co-signed a few copies for fun. But despite all that, it wasn't until recently that she actually sat down to read the book. She said she tore through it in three days and loved it, which was great to hear, but the reality is that she's just not a big reader. It's nothing personal against me, it's just how she is, and I understand that. That's what you have to keep in mind when your book comes out. Just because you wrote a book, not everyone you know is going to rush out and buy it, much less read it or tell their friends to read it.

 

 

That's what I try to convey to disillusioned authors who contact me. It's so easy to get discouraged, but you have to keep your chin up and keep doing whatever you can to spread the word about your book. Yes, you're going to feel disappointed at times, but that comes with the territory, and you just can't let it stop you. If I had let it stop me, I wouldn't be where I am right now.

 

 

-Maria


 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

 

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Three Ways to Increase Your Opportunity for Sales

 

Book Marketing Takes Persistence

 

 

 

 

985 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, promotion, writing, book_sales
1

You may be a master at developing a thrilling plot or creating a sizzling romantic story line. You may have even become a maestro of horror and the macabre. It’s possible that you’ve nailed every element that defines your chosen genre. But, have you committed to developing the one aspect of story that tends to show up in every genre? Are you bringing the funny to your writing?

 

Humor helps balance your story. We, as storytellers, are responsible for creating conflict. It’s our job to turn up the heat and put our characters through an emotional wringer. That kind of intensity needs to have a release valve to help the reader settle into the story--to give them a breather from all that conflict. Here are what I call my three "stays" of adding humor to a novel:


  1. Stay away from cheap humor: The last thing you want to do is to have your readers roll their eyes at your attempt at humor. Cheap humor is the surest way to start their eyes rolling. What's cheap humor? It's any laugh you can see coming. The laughs with the highest value are the ones the reader will never expect.
  2. Stay away from pop culture references: Including a pop culture reference to solicit a laugh may work great at the time you write and publish your book, but will it be relevant in a year or two? For your answer, think backward and see what the shelf life was for pop culture references a year--two--five years ago.
  3. Stay in character: Make sure the right character is delivering the laugh, and make sure that he or she is not delivering the laugh in the author's voice. Authors sometimes get so eager to add humor to their stories that they force it, and when they do, their voice slips into the narrative. Stay on voice.

 

I realize not everyone is funny. That's okay. No one expects you to be Louis C.K. or Richard Pryor. They are expecting a little reality in the form of levity in your fictional tale. Humor can be the perfect dose of realism to keep them engaged.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Give Your Characters Virtual Depth

Taking a Character from Good to Bad

865 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, humor
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Over-identifying

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 25, 2016

I read a book recently that was an enormous bestseller. It was a surprise hit that was even adapted for film--the book and movie were both a viral sensation. I was anxious to read it, and the story was good. However, there was one particular aspect of the writing that drove me bonkers. The book contained a lot of dialogue, and the writer felt the need to identify the speaker after each line of dialogue was delivered. It created a choppy, uneven reading experience.

 

I'll give you an example, not an actual excerpt from the book, but something similar to what I found. The setting is a news studio. There are two people in the scene, the interviewer and the interviewee. This is the type of exchange they had:

 

Marlon Samuels sat across the desk from Angela Gray, a dour-faced reporter who warmed at once when she received a signal they were on air.

 

"Today my guest is Marlon Samuels, a ballistics expert and founder of the United Investigators Consortium. Welcome to the show, Mr. Samuels," Angela said.

 

"Thank you for having me," Marlon replied.

 

"Mr. Samuels, have you had the opportunity to examine the ballistics evidence in the Connor case?" Angela asked.

 

"I have," Marlon answered.

 

Can you see how intrusive the constant identifiers are? Let's look at the exchange without the identifiers:

 

Marlon Samuels sat across the desk from Angela Gray, a dour-faced reporter who warmed at once when she received a signal they were on air.

 

"Today my guest is Marlon Samuels, a ballistics expert and founder of the United Investigators Consortium. Welcome to the show, Mr. Samuels."

 

"Thank you for having me."

 

"Mr. Samuels, have you had the opportunity to examine the ballistics evidence in the Connor case?"

 

"I have."

 

Isn't that so much smoother? It flows and seems authentic. We know who the speakers are without the identifiers.

 

Don't give in to the temptation to over-identify. Rely on the setting and flow of the conversation to take care of that for you. It will make for a much better reading experience for your fans.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Improving Dialogue

Start a Dialogue with Your Characters

1,220 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, self-publishing, writing, dialogue, dialgue_tags, dialogue_identifier
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For the past year or so I've been working on a new novel, and this one has caused me a lot of angst--and stress. I realize now that the main reason I've had so many problems is that I didn't spend enough time thinking about the protagonist before I started writing. I figured (hoped) she would evolve into a believable, empathetic character as I wrote, but she never really did. The result was a first draft with a heroine who seemed...not real. The early feedback I got from trusted friends varied from "I don't know who she is" to "I don't really like her."

 

Ouch. Hard to hear, but so very necessary. And you know what? My friends were absolutely right. I pride myself on creating believable heroines my readers can root for, but this time I fell short because I was too eager to jump into the process of writing and skipped over the time-intensive planning stage. I've never been much of a planner, and while I think for some stories it's fine to start with an interesting situation or scenario and see where the wind takes you, "winging it" with a protagonist doesn't always work. It certainly didn't for me this time around. Characters can undoubtedly evolve as you go, but for the main one you have to start with a foundation.

 

What did I do with my novel? I took a step back and forced myself to think about my heroine as someone I could meet in real life. What drives her? What makes her laugh? What keeps her awake at night? I went for long walks and imagined I was in her shoes as I took in the scenery unfolding around me. Slowly but surely an image of her as an actual person began to take shape in my head, and from that point everything began to fall into place. I returned to the manuscript and rewrote scenes, dialogue, and descriptions to reflect what this (imaginary) real person would do or say.

 

The rewrite has been slow going and a lot of work, but the result is a greatly improved story. On my next book I won't make the same mistake. I'll do the mental work up front to save myself a lot of time and energy on the other side.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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What Do You Do When a Character Isn't Working?

Writing Tip: Does Your Dialogue Sound Realistic?

4,704 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, character_development, heroines
2

The word "said" is the most common dialogue identifier. That is to say, authors use it to break up a conversation and apply a character name or the appropriate pronoun to help the reader keep track of who is saying what at any given time. It can be overused. It can be underused. The trick is finding the right balance.

 

"Said" is declarative. Technically. In the strictest sense. But to an artist, strict is not always applicable. With that in mind, I've had a debate on a number of occasions about the use of the word "said" beyond its declarative nature.

 

By declarative, I mean "said" is usually applied thusly in a novel:

 

"Mike is coming over this morning," I said.

 

The declaration is that Mike is coming over this morning. Simple. So, how do we use "said" in a non-declarative sense? We use it when a character says something in the form of a question--but in a situation when it's not necessarily a question. Primarily, it can be used to convey disbelief, as in this example:

 

We all saw her enter the room, but I was the only one who saw her destiny. The entire rest of her life flashed before my eyes, and I couldn't stop grinning. Without thinking, I said, "I'm going to marry that girl."

 

"You?" Brian said. "You can't even talk to girls."

 

Not my best writing, but quality aside, to use the word "asked" as the identifier for Brian seems inappropriate to me because he's not really asking a question. He's making a statement of disbelief. His friend just said something that completely goes against his character. In essence, Brian is declaring his skepticism.

 

So, what say you, fellow writers? Can you say a question when it's not really a question but a statement of disbelief? Is "said" the appropriate identifier in this case?

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Does Grammar Matter?

"Not adverbs," He Said Angrily.

1,031 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, dialogue_identifier, declarative
1

Writing a novel without adjectives is impossible. Writing this 250+ word blog post without adjectives is impossible. But there is a line of thought in the literary community that adjectives should be used sparingly. This isn't a new sentiment. In fact, Mark Twain once said the following about adjectives:

 

"When you catch an adjective, kill it. No, I don't mean utterly, but kill most of them--then the rest will be valuable. They weaken when they are close together. They give strength when they are far apart."

 

Studies have shown that in academic writing, adjectives detract from the message of the work. Of course, we mostly concern ourselves with fiction. It's a completely different discipline and mindset. Does an overuse of adjectives ruin a novel?

 

I've scoured the internet to find consensus on this matter and hopefully uncover an acceptable adjective to non-adjective ratio for writers of fiction, and I have found nothing. There are those who believe that the use of adjectives in writing has been deemed less and less acceptable over the years by the literary elite. Some point out that certain genres--like romance and fantasy--embrace the use of adjectives more than other genres.

 

I side with Mark Twain on this one. I think adjectives are more effective if they are used in moderation. Use them too much and you run the risk of telling your readers what they should get out of a passage. You, the writer, get in the way of the story. Step back and let the reader do some of the work. Let them find the meaning in your story on their own. Let them come up with their own adjectives.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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"Not Adverbs," He Said Angrily.

 

Invest in Your Writing

1,024 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, writing, fiction, adjectives
1

In the past I've blogged about how giving your characters quirks helps make them seem like real people. The same can be said for peppering your manuscript with the occasional detail. Adding descriptive nuggets such as colors, sounds or smells enriches the picture forming in your readers' minds, which draws them into the story. And that's exactly what you want to happen--you want your readers to feel completely immersed in the world you've created for them. Novels are about escaping from real life, so give readers somewhere to escape to!

 

Details also allow you to show your readers about characters and situations rather than tell them. In other words, details allow readers to infer things about characters without your having to overtly mention them.

 

For example:

 

  • Instead of stating that Joe loves jazz music, why not have jazz music frequently playing in the background at Joe's apartment?

 

  • If the heavyset, middle-aged Penny longs a bit obsessively for the glory days of high school, perhaps her walls are dotted with one too many faded pictures of her dressed in a tiny cheerleader outfit?

 

  • If Stephanie is nervous about an important job interview, are her palms sweaty? Does she have shadows under her eyes from being up all night?

 

My longtime editor, Christina Henry de Tessan, loves detail, and she's always pushing me to add more. I hate her for it because it's more work for me, but I love her for it because I know she's right. Scenes sprinkled with detail draw readers in by giving them something to grab on to. And when your readers are grabbing on, they're entertained, and that's the whole point, right?

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Use Beats to Show, Not Tell

Connect with Your Characters

3,905 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, self-publishing, writers, writing
4

I start today's blog post with a quote from Stephen King:

 

"I believe the road to **** is paved with adverbs, and I will shout it from the rooftops."

 

This declaration of adverse feelings toward adverbs comes from the horror master's book On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. Let's just say he is not a fan of modifiers that end in "-ly." Given that he's sold tens of millions of books and has had a career that has spanned five decades, it would be wise to at least hear him out.

 

King's main objection is centered on using "-ly" words that follow verbs that identify a speaker of dialogue--said, shouted, whispered, asked, etc. His objection covers a great deal more ground, but he directs his ire on this element of story specifically. His argument is that they are unnecessary at best and intrusive at worst. The context of a passage should be enough to inform the reader of intent.

 

Let's examine the use of such adverbs in a practical setting. Let's say you are writing a mystery. A detective is interrogating a suspect. So, what do we know about the story and characters just from these variables? We know a lot just from the genre. Mystery suggests that your plot is fraught with unknowns that will be uncovered throughout the course of the book. The roll of the characters suggests a somewhat adversarial relationship. We have a lot of information going into the interrogation. The suspect tells the detective he is innocent, and the detective's reply can be written one of two ways:

 

"Why should I believe you?" he asked.

 

Or

 

"Why should I believe you?" he asked skeptically.

 

The detective is questioning a suspect. We can safely assume that he will be skeptical of any claim made by a man he suspects of a crime. Now, that's an easy example, but the same kind of logic can be applied in less obvious cases. You just have to trust the reader.

 

There will be times when these modifiers are necessary, but for the most part, I think King is correct. They should be avoided as much as possible.

 

-Richard

 

[INSERT BIO CODE HERE]

 

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Overwriting? Just Say It!

A Good Writer Can Ruin a Good Story

1,517 Views 4 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, dialogue, grammar, adverbs, stephen_king
1

Common Word Mix-ups

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 29, 2015

Today I'd like to give a little refresher course on two sets of similar words that can be a little tricky. Here we go:

 

Imply vs. Infer

 

To imply means to suggest or indicate something without actually saying so:

 

  • After David tasted the wine, the look on his face implied that he didn't like it.
  • The tone of Gloria's voice implied that she was upset with David's decision to leave the party early.

 

To infer means to conclude based on evidence:

 

  • From the look on David's face after he tasted the wine, Gloria inferred that he didn't like it.
  • Given the tone of Gloria's voice, it wasn't difficult for David to infer that she was upset with his decision to leave the party early.

 

I find that a good way to remember the difference between the two is that imply (has an M) comes before infer (has an N), just like M comes before N. You need an implication before you can have an inference.

 

Note: Some informal schools of thought say that infer can also be used to mean "imply or hint." However, to quote Webster's Dictionary, this usage "is found in print chiefly in letters to the editor and other informal prose, not in serious intellectual writing."

 

Refer vs. Recommend

 

To refer (used with an object) means to direct someone (to something):

 

  • Gloria referred David to her real estate agent.
  • David's family doctor referred him to a specialist named Dr. Greene.

 

To recommend means to mention favorably:

 

  • Gloria recommended her real estate agent to David.
  • David's family doctor recommended a specialist named Dr. Greene.

 

If you're still having trouble with these two, here's a handy trick: In a letter of recommendation, you're being praised. In a doctor's referral, you're being directed somewhere.

 

If you want people to recommend your books or refer their friends to your work, you will infer from this post that correct word usage is important!

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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More Grammar Pet Peeves!

Why Good Grammar Matters

1,043 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, grammar_tips
2

I listened to an archived public radio interview with the late David Foster Wallace not long ago, and he made an interesting statement about his writing process. He said that he spent approximately an hour a day writing, then he spent the rest of the day worrying about not writing. Hearing a legendary talent make such a statement made me feel so much better about my own process. Every time I step away from the computer, I kick myself for not writing. I worry that I haven't written enough for the day.

 

Here's what I've come to believe: worrying about not writing is essentially writing. My mind's eye instinctively latches onto a point of the story I walked away from, and I, almost in a panic, focus on what's going to happen next. I replay it over and over again, adding details as I return to the starting point and play the scene out to its conclusion. I wouldn't do that if I wasn't worried about not writing.

 

So, this is strange to say, but I'm thankful for this almost obsessive inability to let go of the guilt of not writing enough. Without it, I might not be able to construct a story. I might not ever be able to develop my characters, or plot out conflicts and conclusions. If I didn't worry about not writing, I might never write.

 

So, to you, my fellow writers, I say embrace that worried feeling that you're not writing enough. It's all part of the writing process.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Life Outside of Writing

Is There Value in Formulaic Writing?

972 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self-publishing, writer, writing, craft, writing_tips, writing_advice
0

Are you missing an untapped revenue stream? Classrooms and books go together like toast and butter. Your book could be a perfect fit for a classroom environment. It doesn't even necessarily have to be a book for young adults. There are countless opportunities to reach students of all ages and backgrounds, and you increase your chances of reaching such a market by doing one thing: creating a teacher's guide for your book.

 

Here is what to include in a teacher's guide should you choose to tap into the classroom market:

  1. One sentence description: This should explain the main conflict of the book.

  2. Short but detailed summary of the book: Write it in present tense and use adjectives sparingly. This is a cut-and-dried summary that covers plot and sub-plots from beginning to end.

  3. Detailed character descriptions: Include your secondary characters.

  4. Summaries for each chapter: Include questions for classroom discussions.

  5. Author interview: Create 10 questions that you think are relevant to the book and offer engaging responses.

 

There are two options you can pursue with the teacher's guide: you can offer it in print-on-demand and eBook formats and make it available for sale, or you can create a PDF that can be downloaded from your website for free. The first option provides you a new direct stream of revenue. The second option can be a loss leader that could lead to more sales of the book overall. Either method gives you the opportunity to reach more readers and make more money.

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

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