Skip navigation
1 ... 33 34 35 36 37 ... 94 Previous Next

Resources

1,402 Posts
4

The best lines of dialogue I have ever written are things that I would never, ever say. Hyperbolically speaking, they are things I would never say in a hundred million years. On the flip side, the worst and least memorable lines of dialogue I have ever written are things I would say and have said. I'm an everyday average Joe who leads an exceedingly boring life. The things I say in real life just aren't that compelling.

 

Remember this: You aren't your characters. Love them, hate them, cry for them, and curse them, but don't design them in your own image. Some of you may disagree because you feel like your characters have to reflect your own values and experiences if you are to connect with them. And the truth is, you will share similarities with some or all of your characters just as you do with the strangers you meet in real life. But your characters are separate from you. They make decisions and behave in ways you never would.

 

It's very tempting to say things in your own voice. A novel is a powerful platform to showcase your beliefs and desires, but if you do this too much, you run the risk of writing prose that comes off as invalid or preachy. Your work will be more authentic if you remove yourself and your opinions from the equation and let the characters speak for themselves. If you think about it, readers should never know what a writer would say in a certain situation just by reading his or her books. They may think they know, but that just means you've done your job of creating believable, multidimensional characters.

 

It sounds contradictory, but the greatest compliment you may ever get from a reader is that he or she is angry with you for something "you" said in a book. But you can rest easy knowing that you didn't say it - your characters did - because your fictional universe is different from your reality.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Finished Your Manuscript? Check Your Dialogue

Learning Dialogue from the Masters

2,350 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, craft, dialogue
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Book Marketing 101 -Jane Friedman

It takes time, energy, and passion to promote a book.          

                                       

How to Stay Focused & Motivated to Get Your Book Done -The Future of Ink

What do you do when your right brain wants to quit?

 

Film

 

5 Hot Indie Directors on Why Studios Don't Make Their Kinds of Films Anymore - Hollywood Reporter

Why independent filmmakers can take risks studios can't.

 

Five Storytellers: Filmmakers Using Social Media Effectively - Business 2 Community

Contributing writer Ron Mwangaguhunga reveals filmmakers that are getting it right on social media. 

                                    

Music

 

Corey Koehler - Tamara Leigh's TREND ON

Corey Koehler of Musicgoat discusses marketing, branding, local gigs, and more.

 

What I Learned From a Wedding Gig -Ashley J. Saunders

A guide to playing with musicians you don't know.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup - November 15, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - November 8, 2013

789 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: music, self-publishing, promotion, indie, movies, writers, writing, book_marketing, studios, films, promotions, music_marketing, writing_process, filmmakers, branding
13

Here's my normal writing ritual: I write to a respectable word count for the day (rarely more than 2,000 words, although I have cranked out as many as 8,000). The next morning, I don't start where I left off. I read what I wrote the day before. Sometimes, I start from the beginning of the story and read. It settles me into the action and gives me a better sense of the characters.

 

What I've discovered is that I start off reading silently, but somewhere along the way, I switch to reading out loud. I don't know why, but there are times I just can't help myself. I've even recorded myself doing these readings. Once I got over the fact that I hate the sound of my own voice, I discovered two things listening to these readings. First, I display embarrassingly bad acting chops as I take on the personalities and voices of the various characters (trust me, Mr. Oscar and I will never be on a first-name basis). 

 

But secondly, and more importantly, reading out loud helps me hear bad writing. There are passages that I have written with great care and particular pride that I tore to shreds once I heard the words coming out of my own mouth. I honestly had no idea what I was thinking. Had I not recorded myself reading the material, there's a chance I would have missed how utterly awful it was.

 

I encourage you to give this exercise a try. Turn on your computer microphone, read your story, and listen. It may be weird, perhaps even a little unsettling at first, but in the end, it will help you become a better writer.   

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

 

Creative Writing Exercises

Catching the Vanishing Idea

7,835 Views 13 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, editing, proofreading, drafts, craft, rewriting
1

Each time I complete a novel (I just finished my sixth), I read it over from the beginning. I always find myself making tweaks to the dialogue, especially in the earlier chapters. I do so because the characters have clearly evolved, and some of the early lines I gave them no longer "fit" their personalities.

 

For example, as my latest book progressed, one of the characters revealed a witty side. I hadn't planned this from the onset, but it worked, so I went with it. When I initially introduced him, however, he was more straight-laced, so as I read the manuscript from page one, his early comments fell a bit flat - which made him feel a bit flat. I went back and fixed it, which reinforced a valuable lesson for me: Dialogue doesn't necessarily impact the plot, but it impacts character development, which is just as important.

 

I remember seeing a movie version of a popular TV series and feeling disappointed because the dialogue was so different than what I was used to. "She wouldn't say that," I remember thinking over and over. "That just doesn't sound like him." I walked out of the theater that day convinced that the producers had brought in new writers for the film - and I felt a bit cheated as a result.

 

Good stories do a wonderful job of creating characters who are like real people to the audience, and that's what you want to do with your manuscript. So when you're finished, go back and read that dialogue with fresh eyes. Do you think it rings true throughout for each of your characters? If it doesn't, change it! That's the fun thing about being the author - it's all up to you.

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Use Adverbs Sparingly, Especially in Dialogue

Character and Action

4,468 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: author, self-publishing, writing, craft, dialogue
2

We authors are not normally known for our ability to stand before a crowd and share our creative works publicly. A lot of us enjoy the relative safety of working in seclusion and not having to see the faces and witness the reactions of readers as they take in our beloved prose for the first time. Doing a public reading can be both terrifying and liberating, and if you ever get the chance to do it, I highly recommend it.

 

I'm not suggesting you throw down a sturdy crate in a public park, climb atop it, and start reading pages to passersby (although, I have nothing against it if it's something you want to try), but I am suggesting you can find venues in your nearby cities that are perfect settings for readings. In fact, you may find a calendar of events in your local paper that includes an open mic night in town. If not, start calling around to see if you can organize such an event.

 

I would begin with locally owned businesses first. The owners are members of the community, and they will likely be more open to supporting the arts. A natural fit for readings by local authors? Coffee shops, of course. If that turns out to be a dead end, try a restaurant with a bar that may be looking for ways to get customers in the door after dinner hours. You may even try a neighborhood community center that has open classrooms on weekends, or of course, your local library.

 

If you're putting a reading together, be clear on your book's subject. Reiterate any disclaimers to the crowd before the first reading. You don't want attendees to be caught off guard by your material and you don't want to be in a situation where you're reading for the "wrong" audience.

 

Once it's organized, promote, promote, promote. Take to social media, contact local writers' groups, and announce it on your blog. Get the word out, and have a blast.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Coffee And Books

How to Make a Personal Appearance a Success

4,394 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: author, self-publishing, writers, promotions
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

50 Places to Go for an Inspiration Date to Ignite Your Creative Ideas -The Future of Ink

Where do you go for inspiration?            

                                                    

The Impact of Using Video for Your Book -The Creative Penn

See how video helped one author connect with her readers.

 

Film

                                                        

How to Film the Great Outdoors Using a DSLR - Filmmaking.net

The DSLR camera is a natural choice for shooting nature in all its glory.

                                          

5 Tips for Writing Better Characters into Your Screenplay - Noam Kroll

Let the character arc occur naturally. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

More Music Marketing Tips for Twitter - Musicgoat

Does every member of your band have a Twitter account promoting your music?

 

 

5 Ways to Throw an Epic Album Release Party -Hypebot.com

If you want it to look like a big deal, make it a big deal.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup - November 8, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - November 1, 2013

998 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, selling, filmmaking, writers, films, promotions, twitter, music_marketing, inspiration, musicians, cameras, social_media, photography_advice
2

Making it in publishing (indie or otherwise) is hard - hard in the same way it is to sail a boat without wind. It's a beautiful calm day on the water, and you're surrounded by breathtaking scenery. Schools of fish swim just below the glassy surface, birds soar overhead in a bright blue sky...yet all you can concentrate on is the fact that you're aimlessly drifting. 

 

So, when should you give up? When is enough enough? Tell me if this sounds familiar: You did your part. You wrote the best possible book you could write. You've blogged about it. You've taken to social media and done everything you can to get your friends and followers to help you spread the word. You've done personal videos. You may have even spent some money on advertising. But still the wind hasn't picked up. 

 

Don't give up on the wind; just stop waiting for it. You can still appreciate the scenery; that is to say, keep enjoying the writing. Here's the thing: as much as we hate to acknowledge it, drifting is moving. You put yourself in the water. You hoisted your sails. You are prepared for the wind. The longer you're on the water, the greater the chance you'll catch the wind and skirt over the waves. 

 

Writing keeps you on the water with your sails up. Keep at it. Appreciate it. Instead of focusing on what you haven't achieved, focus on how far you've come, what you've learned, the stories you have yet to write. A strong gust is bound to come along, and until then, there's too much else that deserves your attention.  

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

That Wise Old Doubt

How to Get Through the First Draft

2,000 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, author, promotion, sales, promotions, self-doubt, marketing_strategy
1

My friend Katie Mahon co-wrote a memoir with two friends. I was curious about their process because while I think co-authoring would be an interesting experience - as well as a viable option for aspiring authors daunted by the thought of writing an entire book on their own - I also think it would be extremely difficult for several reasons (e.g. varied working styles, expectations, personalities, etc.). I posed these concerns to Katie, and here are her thoughts on how they made the process fruitful and enjoyable:

 

Sounds almost romantic, doesn't it? She's your friend, she's talented and you want to get to know her better. You both have similar ideas for the great American novel, so why not write it together? Half the work and twice the fun! Or maybe not so much, depending on your ability to build a healthy collaboration. I have lived to tell that tale - well, not the great American novel part. In fact, we wrote a spiritual nonfiction book together. There were three of us, and it took 10 years. In the end, here's how our successful partnership resulted in our memoir, The Miracle Chase, being published:

 

 

  1. Communication: Reaching agreement on common goals and vision requires developing trust in each other. Answer "what will the book be" by recognizing that the end result, your collective vision, is bigger than your individual one. That means checking your ego at the door, putting on your listening cap and really listening without distraction or agenda...and without thinking of what you will say next.
  2. Connection: Now that you've arrived at a common vision, have collateral in the trust bank and know each other better, figure out how you will go about your task - divide and conquer, or literally write together. What voice will you use? In our case, we used all three voices and wrote the book by handing the narrative over to each other, kind of like a relay race, each one picking up the narrative thread where the last author left off. We also wrote some passages together in order to make transitions more fluid and seamless.
  3. Staying the course: Goethe, the philosopher and poet said: "At the moment of commitment, the entire universe conspires to assist you." Staying the course means committing wholeheartedly together and having the confidence to believe in your dreams. Writing a book is hard work, but presumably work you enjoy; seeing it through to publication is something else altogether. Tenacity, never say die, asking for help, picking yourself up after rejection...these are all characteristics that will serve you well and are definitely better experienced with a partner. You've made it this far; don't quit five minutes before the miracle happens.

 

Thanks to Katie for her sage advice. I'm still not sure I could co-author a book because I write fiction and want to have control of the entire manuscript if my name is going on the jacket, but that's just my personality. As Katie has demonstrated, it's clearly doable if you and your partners work hard to stay (figuratively) on the same page.

 

How about you - would you ever co-author a book?

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Uniting Author Brands

Writing with a Partner

2,857 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writers, craft, co-authoring
1

It's Too Much!

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 11, 2013

Recently, I wrote a blog post asking you if you're doing enough to market your book. The idea came from conversations I've had with authors over the years about their frustration over not selling enough books. Delving deeper into their complaint, I would invariably discover that they weren't doing much in the way of marketing.

 

Our discussion would then turn to what most successful authors are doing. The most common responses I would get were shocked utterances of "Really?" or various groans and sighs. When our conversation ended, and we went our separate ways, I sometimes wondered if I did the new author a disservice. Instead of running out and starting a blog, storming the social media sites, cranking out personal videos and adopting various other marketing strategies used by authors, I imagine a good number of them were too overwhelmed to do anything. My information dump buried them under a pile of unfamiliar and daunting self-promotional tasks.

 

If the thought of doing it all prevents you from doing anything, don't do it all. Just do one or two things. I understand that there isn't enough time in the day to write, work, promote and live for most people. There has to be some give somewhere. Prioritize how you see fit. It's your journey. You'll likely be even more effective with your book marketing if you devote all of your attention to the things you're really good at rather than splitting your time and effort across many promotional areas.

 

It's more important that you do something instead of doing nothing. Even if you decide to do nothing, no one will revoke your privilege to publish. So if you start to feel overwhelmed, adjust your expectations and just do what you can.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Book Marketing: Have You Tapped Your Network?

Looking for Marketing Tips? Here's What's Working for One Indie Author - and What Isn't

3,149 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, promotion
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Target Marketing for Authors - Email Marketing -BadRedhead Media

When spam isn't spam.     

                                       

Promote Your Book with Pinterest -The BookBaby Blog

Did you know Pinterest drives more traffic to content publishers' sites than Twitter, LinkedIn, and Reddit combined?

 

Film

                                                        

Independent Filmmaking - To Webisode, or Not to Webisode... - NOHO Art District

Webisodes can build your brand, but is it the right move for your career?

 

Directing Directors on the 'Right' Approach to Coaching Actors - The Wrap

Have you tried the Travis Technique of directing actors?

                                    

Music

 

How to Build an Effective Band Website - The Musicians Guide

What is your website's purpose?

 

How My Damaged Voice Came Back -Judy Rodman

All is not lost when you lose your voice.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup - November 1, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - October 25, 2013

999 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, movies, writers, writing, films, directing, social_networking, musicians, filmmakers, social_media, marketing_strategy, wesbite
0

Beta Readers

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 6, 2013

Since the early days of my publishing journey, I've always had a few trusted readers whom I've gone to for feedback in the early stages of a book. I didn't know it at the time, but those people are called beta readers. The use of beta readers has become a growing phenomenon since the meteoric rise of independent publishing.

 

In essence, beta readers are a focus group, or what the film industry calls test audiences. They can provide invaluable feedback that will help you shape a better story, but you have to learn how to parse their comments and separate those directed at style as opposed to structure. In my view, style is an artistic choice that you as the artist should almost stubbornly hold tight to. It's your book, your voice, your choice.

 

Structure is another matter all together. Let's say that a few of your readers comment that they didn't feel like they connected with your main character. What they are saying is that your character is too one-dimensional. There's not enough in your story to create empathy for the character. That's a structure issue. You need to go back to the drawing board and find ways to add depth to your character. The same applies if you get comments about plot points. Maybe your beta readers are telling you that your main conflict wasn't strong enough, or your conclusion left them somewhat unsatisfied. Those are comments on structure. Consider them carefully and tinker as you feel warranted.

 

Beta readers are doing you an incredible service. They are taking time to read your work and give you feedback. Be careful not to ask too much of them, because you'll probably ask them to read your future titles. If you can, reward them in some way, even if it's a small gesture. In the end, you won't just have beta readers, you'll have super-fans that will be excited to tell their friends and family about your book.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Considering a Reader's Suggestion

Find Advocates with Free Books

1,982 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, beta_readers
0

Goodreads is a smart (and free) way for authors to reach avid readers. With 20 million members, 570 million books, and 24 million reviews, it is now the world's largest site for readers and book recommendations. Here are a few tips for how to use it:

 

  1. Create an author profile and include your book title(s), bio, headshot, website, Twitter handle, blog, etc.
  2. Run a giveaway. Giveaways are free to list and drive awareness of your book. You can run as many giveaways as you like for however many copies you want to provide. Even if winners don't post a review, they will likely add your book to their "To-Read" shelf, which will provide exposure for your book.
  3. Add the Goodreads widget to your website to let people know they can post reviews of your work there. Just like with Twitter and Facebook, you want to let readers know where to find you. Goodreads provides a variety of widgets to help you promote your books.
  4. Join groups and talk about books (not just your own). Goodreads members like to talk about what they're reading, and you can tap into that discussion by joining groups that interest you. Avoid excessive self-promotion, but feel free to express your opinion!
  5. Create an event and invite your friends and followers. You can create all kinds of events, including book signings, online chats, cover reveals, and book launches.
  6. Use your blog and the "status update" feature to keep fans informed about your books. You can import your blog from Blogger, Wordpress, Tumblr, or other blogging platforms.

 

Bonus advice: As I discussed in a previous post, I don't recommend commenting on reviews, especially negative ones. Bad reviews can actually improve the perception of your work, as it shows that real, unbiased people are reading it. Resist the temptation to dispute a poor review, but do flag it if it violates the Goodreads terms of service.

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

 

 

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Watch for Errors in Marketing Materials

Tips for Promoting Your Book on Twitter

13,260 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, author, promotion, promotions, social_networking, social_media, marketing_strategy
1

The Next Big Thing

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 4, 2013

"Be an early adopter." Taking that advice can be the key to finding unprecedented success in marketing because when you are one of the first to adopt the next big trend, you are then positioned to accompany that trend to the top. It's like being on the ground floor of a new business venture that turns out to be a game-changing enterprise.

 

The trick is to know which "next big thing" really is the next big thing. There are new social media sites popping up constantly. Some come and go before anyone takes notice. Others reach the stratosphere and carve out their own little spot in the social media universe. There's no way to know for sure which ones will take off, but if you make it point to visit some of the trend-watching sites listed below on a regular basis, you'll have a great chance of finding "the one" that will help you take your brand to the next level.

 

  • Mashable- Founded by Pete Cashmore in 2005, Mashable is the go-to news source for all things social media. It is one of the best trend-watching tools out there today.

  • TechCrunch- This site prides itself on finding and reporting on new technology start-ups and breaking news in the tech industry.

  • ReadWriteWeb- Founded in 2003 by Richard MacManus, the site is one of the oldest to cover tech news in the age of social media.

 

There are others of course. You can find a fairly comprehensive list by visiting moreofit. Pick a time out of every day to spend 15 minutes perusing a few of these sites and you just might become an early adopter of the next big trend in social media.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Today's New Media

Six-Second Branding with Apps

7,815 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, self-publishing, promotions, mashable, techcrunch, readwriteweb
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Write a Good Book in 30 Days -The Book Designer

It's time to get down to business with the fast and furious prose.       

                                                    

Social Media for Authors: How to Make the Juggling Act a Little Easier -The BookBaby Blog

Remove all those moving parts from your social media strategy to make it more manageable.

 

Film

                                                        

3 New Skills Every Digital Editor Should Develop - Filmmaking.net

A web 2.0 world requires even veteran editors to learn new skills.

                                          

10 Zero-Budget Filmmaking Tips - Filmmaker IQ

If you can limit the number of locations in your film, you can greatly reduce your budget.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

5 Practice Tips to Improve Your Musical Skill - The Big Picture Music Production Blog

Do you have set goals when you practice?

 

Common Mistakes Producers/Engineers Make That Sabotage Singers -Judy Rodman

Something as simple as microphone placement can affect a singer's voice.

 

-Richard                                                                                

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup - October 25, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - October 18, 2013

1,495 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, music, filmmaking, budget, author, promotion, writers, writing, films, musicians, filmmakers, social_media, singers
0

Is there such a thing as life outside of writing for those of us who've chosen to pursue writing as a career? Most of the world thinks our job is done solely in front of the computer, as if we clock in as soon as our fingers hit that first key. Try as I might, I've had a difficult time explaining to some people that writers are never truly "off the clock."

 

A writer's mind is an odd and special thing. It makes connections with external stimuli that sometimes barely qualify as stimuli; it's not like we're walking around eavesdropping on other people's conversations for story ideas when we're not in front of the computer. Inspiration may come from something as simple as walking down a busy street and noticing the way someone is subconsciously twirling her hair while she chats away on a cell phone. That twirl of the hair can trigger a "what if" moment. What if she's twirling her hair because she's living with a terrible secret? What if that terrible secret is about to catch up to her? We are bombarded by these types of triggers every day. We don't look for them, but they're there, waiting for us around virtually every corner.

 

So, there may not be a life outside of writing. Shutting that part of brain off just might be impossible. But there is a way to live leisurely and happily with this "always on" status. Carry a pen and small notepad with you. When an idea comes to you in the middle of nowhere, jot it down and clear it out of your head. It's a safety net that will enable you to release the idea and live your life…until the next trigger, that is.  

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in…

 

The Boring Parts of a Novel

The Book That Made You a Novelist

4,023 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: writers, publishing, writing, drafts, craft
1 ... 33 34 35 36 37 ... 94 Previous Next

Actions