Skip navigation
This discussion is archived
4,263 Views 5 Replies Last post: Oct 28, 2012 12:15 PM by walton RSS
Level 0 5 posts since
Aug 22, 2012
Currently Being Moderated

Oct 28, 2012 10:06 AM

Black ink - True Black?

I have several black boxes that I want to ensure print solid black. I currently have them set as CMYK with 100% K. The actual printed proof appears to be dark gray instead of black. What can I do to fix this. Using InDesign CS3.

 

Thank you.

Level 5 5,767 posts since
Mar 10, 2012
Currently Being Moderated
1. Oct 28, 2012 10:16 AM in response to: GracieLou
Re: Black ink - True Black?

Use a rich black of 240% TIC, most recommend 60% C, 40% M, 40% Y, and 100% K but there are thousands of rich black variations you can use. While CS will allow registration black (100% across the board) most printers will not and since some EDC books could be outsourced it is best to stay within the 240% TIC restriction.

 

R. C.

Level 5 18,532 posts since
Sep 5, 2009
Currently Being Moderated
2. Oct 28, 2012 11:27 AM in response to: GracieLou
Re: Black ink - True Black?

If your black is 100% K-only (C00 M00 &00 K100), it will (or should print sold black).  CS's black (K only) is a beautiful, silky, black.  Any, repeat, anything other than 100% K-only will be screened.

 

Less than 100% of any color will be screened; and if in full color printing any of the colors is less than 100% they all get screened.

 

The paradox about black is that there is blacker than black: rich blacks, as RC mentions.  Photoshop black, C75 M68 Y67 K90, is a good example, others abound. CS can print up to 400% TIC (Total Ink Coverage) with no problem--400% would be registration black (C100 M100 Y100 K100.  However, all of these, except registration black, will be screened.

 

Now here's the catch--these are all 100% K-only:

 

No one has offered any explanation for why this is.  (The test book was made up of identical pages, set in Word, with one full color image and a few lines of large, 72 pt (maybe bigger, I don't remember), text.  Each page was converted to a PDF using the methods idicated, then the PDFs were combined and printed by CS.)  The a's that are screened would appear lighter than the solid a's, but about like comparing 98-99% black to 100% black . . .

 

Walton

Level 5 18,532 posts since
Sep 5, 2009
Currently Being Moderated
5. Oct 28, 2012 12:15 PM in response to: GracieLou
Re: Black ink - True Black?

I should have added this:

 

In this comparison, they look quite different, but if, for example, you used the Warm Black, third from bottom, as your black, it would read as black, not brown. At 100%, only the first (registration black) and the last (K-only), are not screened.  Converting any of these--except the first and last--to black and whtie printing would result in the black being screened.

 

Walton

Actions

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...