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1,800 Views 14 Replies Last post: Nov 21, 2017 9:10 AM by awin RSS
Level 1 53 posts since
Aug 16, 2015
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Nov 1, 2017 5:04 PM

problem: white pages too translucent!

I did a search and couldn't find a fix for my problem, so here it is...

 

My book is 8" x 10" black&white on white paper. It contains 60 figures, each is a line drawing (a geometric figure). The current interior design has one figure per page and two figures per leaf. The problem is that the white paper is sufficiently translucent that when viewing a page the figure on the backside of the leaf is faintly visible through the leaf. Since this is artwork, this is definitely distracting!

 

Here are the solutions I'm considering:

 

(1) use only one figure per leaf. This adds 30 pages to the book, which isn't a big deal. This isn't a perfect solution, because the figure on page n + 2 will still be faintly visible when viewing the figure on page n. However, this is only true when the leaf is flat against the next leaf. When the reader begins to turn the page, the problem disappears. So, this is a 90% solution that might be acceptable.

 

(2) use cream paper. I notice that the cream paper has a larger thickness, so perhaps (?) it is less translucent. On the negative side, I prefer the high contrast that comes with white paper. Also, I lose the option for Expanded Distribution if I go this route.

 

Does anyone have any other ideas or comments on what I'm proposing?

 

Thanks!

 

P.S. This problem completely disappears for the e-book, which is cheap compared to the print version. Maybe I should just send any aggravated customers to the e-book?

Level 3 917 posts since
May 25, 2010
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1. Nov 1, 2017 5:32 PM in response to: alpha_beta_50
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!

I've had books printed with both cream and white and I really really really dislike the cream paper. In my humble opinion, it just makes everything look washed out so I only print on white paper now.

 

If bleeding through the paper is that big of an issue I'd go with your first option and use one graphic per leaf.

OR

Make the images grey or less opaque so not as much ink gets laid down on the page.

 

Best of luck!

 

Magic_Man

===================================================

Yes, you CAN format your manuscript into a book format with MS Word.

http://briskiconsulting.teachable.com/

Click the link to reach a step-by-step video course.

 

I've made the lesson on inserting Page Numbers FREE so you can see my teaching style and detail.

Level 5 4,128 posts since
Oct 27, 2010
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3. Nov 2, 2017 6:40 AM in response to: alpha_beta_50
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!

The problem with using anything less than 100% black is that the figures will be screened - lines will be reduced to patterns of dots. I doubt you'll like the effect. Before dismissing cream paper you could do a couple of 24-page proofs - one of each paper type, and with different combinations of page layout and grey. Then you would know which option was the best, without trying to guess.

Level 5 12,993 posts since
Aug 22, 2008
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4. Nov 2, 2017 7:34 AM in response to: alpha_beta_50
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!

If you're committed to printing through CreateSpace, then printing on only one side of each leaf would be my suggestion. I don't believe cream paper will significantly reduce show-through, and I don't think you'd be happy the conversion of your line art to halftones for grayscale output.

 

Another solution would be to choose a different printer that offers thicker paper (at least 70#). This would cost more, but if the nature of the book is such that your prospective readers would have a legitimate reason to be aggravated by the degree of show-through that occurs with 55# offset, then they should be willing to pay a little more for higher quality. If they're not, then maybe this isn't that big a problem.

Level 3 443 posts since
Oct 16, 2014
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6. Nov 2, 2017 5:41 PM in response to: alpha_beta_50
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!

The type of book you describe sounds similar to the ones I do (in your first post I imagined you were making an art-type book).  While there is some show-through, I don't think it's at all objectionable, or even any worse than those other books in general.  I just compared a CS proof with three hardcover big-name tech books; two of them were worse than the CS proof, the third was a tie.

 

However, if you are using a heavy font (12-point Georgia would be an example of heavy) or graphics with large dark areas, any show-through will certainly be more noticeable.

Level 5 12,993 posts since
Aug 22, 2008
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7. Nov 3, 2017 8:55 AM in response to: reffort
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!

reffort wrote:

The type of book you describe sounds similar to the ones I do (in your first post I imagined you were making an art-type book).  While there is some show-through, I don't think it's at all objectionable, or even any worse than those other books in general.

I agree. I have a management series on my shelf from Harvard Business School Press and another series from John Wiley & Sons. The books in each of those are heavy with things like bar charts and block diagrams, and while their papers are higher quality, those papers are not any thicker (i.e., show-through in a CreateSpace printed book is no worse than it is in those).

Level 5 19,149 posts since
Sep 5, 2009
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8. Nov 3, 2017 9:21 AM in response to: alpha_beta_50
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!

It's called show-through, as Lighthouse said, and, still in agreement, it's a "problem" with most books.  Generally, we line of lines of text (recto/verso) and show through is minimized.

 

Breaking up the text with section breaks, formulas, illustrations, always has this problem . . . CS, Random House, or HarperCollins.  The solution is simple, use a more opaque paper.  Why doesn't everyone do this?  Expense.  And, in the case of CS, lack of paper options.

 

White vs Cream:

 

These are scans and you will notice that nothing is gained in terms of the show-through at the bottome of each image.

 

My observation is that "all" fiction is printed on off white, and most text books, instruction books, etc., are on whtie.

 

Most readers will understand, and not notice the show-through.  Write, edit, design and format your book well . . . that's the key to looking professional.

 

Walton

 

Bleeds,  free, 91 page   guide to bleeds, margins, covers, and annotated CreateSpace guidelines. Prepress Glossary: free, 79 page, fully illustrated prepress glossary with annotations for  CreateSpace users Type & Typography:   free, 112 page illustrated guide to designing books, typography, with glossary, and type specimen pages  Free: list of free PDF downloads; selfpublishingforum: spam free forum. Contact  for graphics, design, and typesetting help.

 

 

Level 3 434 posts since
Dec 13, 2011
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10. Nov 3, 2017 12:00 PM in response to: Lighthouse24
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!
and while their papers are higher quality, those papers are not any  thicker (i.e., show-through in a CreateSpace printed book is no worse  than it is in those).

 

FWIW, the opacity of paper is not directly proportional to the weight. It is possible for one paper of a given weight to be more opaque than another of the same nominal weight.

 

Some years ago I was involved with the production of a college catalogue where there was a concern about the physical weight, because it affected the postage cost. The designer recommended a paper, Coronado Opaque, that minimized the show-through even though it was fairly thin. It may have cost more, but the saving in postage would have been greater.

 

But choices about type, graphics, and layout all affect show-through. At one time, the Protestant and Catholic churches in Germany cooperated on a new edition of the Bible. Show-through is a serious problem in Bible printing because so many are printed on very thin paper. They commissioned a typeface, originally called Biblica, for the project. It set narrow, to reduce the number of pages, but it also had very little variation in stroke weight, to make the color of the page as uniform as possible. Thus, no part of any letter was conspicuously darker than any part of other letters. The typeface is available commercially as ITC Weidemann.

Level 3 434 posts since
Dec 13, 2011
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11. Nov 3, 2017 12:01 PM in response to: alpha_beta_50
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!
One figure in particular was "ruined" by show-through, but a simple  re-ordering of figures has most likely addressed the problem. I'm  satisfied that this is the correct solution to the problem.

 

I'm glad to learn that. I had been thinking that it might help to arrange the pages so that no two figures were back-to-back.

Level 0 3 posts since
Jun 16, 2013
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12. Nov 7, 2017 12:45 PM in response to: alpha_beta_50
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!

Is there any way to retake or scan in the pictures again, but first place a thicker white pice of paper behind it? That would cut down the double image coming thru.  Then re upload the file.  It might help. Worth a try either way.

Level 4 2,929 posts since
Feb 7, 2015
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13. Nov 7, 2017 1:41 PM in response to: Soultry
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!

I suspect you've been too busy spamming other threads to understand the problem.

Level 2 130 posts since
Sep 19, 2017
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14. Nov 21, 2017 9:10 AM in response to: alpha_beta_50
Re: problem: white pages too translucent!

Printing images on only the recto side seems the best solution.  What I would add to that is to not have the verso (left handed pages, or back of the illustration) blank but to have a light grey halftone, preferably full bleed.  You could try a printed proof with different percentages (20%, 30%) for example and see how a light gray will help cut down show-through.  This way you would not need to make the illustrations lighter.

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