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31,544 Views 12 Replies Last post: Nov 13, 2011 8:35 AM by Mommainternet RSS
Level 0 25 posts since
Sep 19, 2011
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Oct 26, 2011 9:05 PM

How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

I am loosing my mind very soon. Worked and worked on my first book. Children's book with illustrations.  Finaly ready and when I insert my 300 dpi images in to Word 2007 I have no idea if Word is not downsizing the dpi to lower resolution than the 300 dpi. No way to check! When I copy an illustration that I inserted into Word and then check it out in Photoshop for its resolution it had 72 dpi. I don't know if this is because of the effect of copying the inserted illustration from Word, or the illustration inserted into Word was downsized by Word itself, since I can't know the resolution from Word  in dpi. How does one know  that the inserted 300 dpi image stays in 300 dpi, when it is alreday in side of Word !?  Please help!

 

I really appreciate to understand this.

 

Thanks

Level 5 18,909 posts since
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1. Oct 27, 2011 6:18 AM in response to: Snowcat
Re: How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

I have spent hours looking for a program that would open a PDF and let you determine the image DPI.  Other than Acrobat and plug-ins for it, I have not found anything that will do what you want.  (But it makes sense there should be something like that.)

 

Word 2007 will downsize (Word calls it "compression") your images, as will Word 2010.  Under Options > Image size and quality select Do not compress images in this file. In Word 2010 this is found under File. Here is:

Image by image (from Magic-man):

o    Click on the image to select it

o    Click on <FORMAT> in the top menu bar

o    Click on <Compress Pictures> on the far left

o    A menu box will pop up.

o    Make sure "Apply to selected pictures only" is UNCHECKED

o    Click on <Options...>

o    UNCHECK "Automatically perform basic compression on save"

o    Click  <OK>

o    Click <OK> again

And here is a global method (from GTaylor):

o    Tools> Compress Pictures > Options

o    Untick "Automatically Perform Basic Compression

 

You must do this before you save the file, because Word is trying to be your friend and reduce unnecessary file size. I would, if I were working in 2007, do the global method.

 

I don't know if opening an image in Photoshop will necessarily tell you what it was in Word.  It should, I guess, but getting images in and out of Word can sometimes be a problem, especially if Word has converted them scrap (.shs) files (from memory, I'm not sure if this is exactly what they're called).

 

Check your PMs. (Edit: I couldn't get a PM to you, write me at my contact below)

 

Walton

Mechanics & Punctuation, free, 20 page guide to everything punctuation  Build Your Book, a free, 98 page guide to designing your book;  CS Digital understand CS digital possibilities; GIMP, free, tutorials, GIMP, GIMP Help, excerpts from GIMP Supremacy Supremacy;  Bleeds, free, 19 page, illustrated guide to bleeds and margins, do's and don't's for CreateSpace;  Contact for graphics, design, and typesetting help.  Disclaimer: all statements of apparent fact in this post are empirical inferences based on observational data. These are idiosyncratic in nature and have not necessarily been subject to verification


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3. Oct 27, 2011 11:04 AM in response to: Snowcat
Re: How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

The image must be inserted sized 100% (the size you intend for it to print in the book) at 300 dpi (more correctly ppi -- yes, they're the same thing in this particular context).  For example, if the image should measure 4"x6" on the physical printed page, then at 300 pixels per inch it must be 1200x1800 pixels.  You could have an image that's 300dpi, yet only measures 2"x3" (meaning it has 600x900 pixels) -- so if you inserted that image, and then you or Word "enlarged" it to fill a 4"x6" print/page layout area, it would only have 150ppi in the PDF.  In other words, 300dpi is only half the requirement.

 

Word does not do anything to the image when you insert it.  Only if you use one of the built-in picture formatting tools to manipulate it, or save the document in another format, does Word resample the image and apply its own compression.  If an image is sized 100% at 300dpi and inserted into the document with no further manipulation, and if the document is saved in the native doc format, the properties of the inserted image are unchanged.  The document can then be printed/distilled to PDF, and unless the tool/setting being used to convert the document to PDF is set to resample or compress images, the image properties will not change during that process either.

 

A "standard" PDF is not meant for commercial print (the standard for that downsamples images to 150dpi) -- so the tool used to create a print-ready PDF must have the settings/ability to handle images properly.  Even Microsoft says that Word's "save as PDF" function was not intended for that.

 

So it's essential to get 300 dpi/ppi with the image sized 100% to start with, maintain that by inserting the image and not manipulating it further, then saving the document in its native doc format and printing/distilling it to PDF with the proper settings.  Do all that and you won't "lose" the 300 dpi (or your mind!).

 

Hope it helps.  Best wishes.

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4. Oct 27, 2011 11:36 AM in response to: Lighthouse24
Re: How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

I have not read that yet, but how do i include images at 300 dpi into Word 2007 Word and how do i remove transparency?

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5. Oct 27, 2011 11:39 AM in response to: Lighthouse24
Re: How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

What is exactly 300 dpi, or ppi?

How do i make a exact 300 dpi image?

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6. Oct 27, 2011 11:41 AM in response to: Johannan
Re: How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

How do i remove transparency in PDF.

I'm requesting elaborate info about that please. It is just, there is almost nowhere to learn those answers.

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7. Oct 27, 2011 12:51 PM in response to: Johannan
Re: How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

Transparency is a feature that permits an image to have opacity less than 100%.  Think of a cartoon cell, or:

 

 

Here the checkerboard means transparency, and it's completely transparent except for the colored shapes. If this were flattened, so that all the layers become one, you would see what there is in the image window, but on white (some of the white triangle--no checkerboard--would disappear into the white background). JPG does not support transparency, it's would white. PNG, TIFF, and GIF files do support transparency.

 

When images are flattened there is often a very slight color shift. Normally this is not a problem, but CS will warn you because it could be or because someone might be very fussy.

 

You can work in GIMP, a free graphics editing program.

 

Walton

Mechanics & Punctuation, free, 20 page guide to everything punctuation  Build Your Book, a free, 98 page guide to designing your book;  CS Digital understand CS digital possibilities; GIMP, free, tutorials, GIMP, GIMP Help, excerpts from GIMP Supremacy Supremacy;  Bleeds, free, 19 page, illustrated guide to bleeds and margins, do's and don't's for CreateSpace;  Contact for graphics, design, and typesetting help. http://www.12on14.com/dpi/color-mystery-1001.pdf Disclaimer: all statements of apparent fact in this post are empirical inferences based on observational data. These are idiosyncratic in nature and have not necessarily been subject to verification


Level 5 12,665 posts since
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8. Oct 27, 2011 2:47 PM in response to: Johannan
Re: How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

You include a 300 dpi image in Word by starting with an image that has 300 pixels per inch of width and height that the image will be when printed in the book (see my example inthe post above).  You then insert the image where you want it on the page (do not copy/paste, and do not use the Format Picture tools to resize or manipulate it).

 

If you're using Word 2007, you can avoid most problematic transparency by not saving the file in the default .docx format (use the .doc Word 98-2003 format instead).  When you convert the .doc file to PDF, you'll want to use the recommended process/settings (which will result in any transparency being flattened).

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10. Oct 29, 2011 11:39 AM in response to: Snowcat
Re: How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

Hi Snowcat,

I feel for your frustration. There may be some good news, though. I always get that Createspace message about the dpi and the transparency and I order a proof anyway to see if the illustrations are acceptable or not. I've only had to switch out a couple of pictures total in 8 kids' books. So fear not, order a proof and maybe you'll be pleasantly surprised.

Debbie

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12. Nov 13, 2011 8:35 AM in response to: Lighthouse24
Re: How not to lose 300 dpi in Word

I'm using Word 2010 and I've used some of the textboxes and other features that weren't available in the 2003 version.  If I save my file as a 2003 I'll lose some of those.  Is there any alternative?  I have redone all my black and white photos in Irfanview to be the correct size and dpi and inserted them into the manuscript, but I'm worried if I save it all  the changes may revert back again.  Can I continue saving my document as a 2010 and then use one of the PDF converters like primopdf to convert it to a pdf to upload to createspace?

 

And by the way I'm very thankful for all those who take the time to post responses here. I don't think I would have been able to figure out what was happening to the quality of my photos without the information posted here.

 

Celeste

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