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36,077 Views 15 Replies Last post: Aug 16, 2012 6:45 PM by ReAnimus_Press RSS
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Level 1 62 posts since
Mar 14, 2011
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Jun 27, 2012 6:19 AM

Cream vs White Paper

When would you use cream, and why?

Level 5 19,168 posts since
Sep 5, 2009
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1. Jun 27, 2012 6:52 AM in response to: woof
Re: Cream vs White Paper

Fiction tends to be printed on off-white/cream. Non-fiction is often printed on off-whtie/cream, although text books, manuals, handbooks, and the like are more often printed on white.

 

The vast majority of the books on my shelves fiction, history, music, philosphy, science, essays, poetry . . . are cream.   To my eye, white is less welcoming than off-white or cream.

 

There is no rule.

 

Walton

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Jun 26, 2012
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2. Jun 27, 2012 8:00 AM in response to: walton
Re: Cream vs White Paper

Thanks for the informatiom, I am new to this field and had chosen the black and white option.  When I read your comment, I realized that white may be a little too bright for a lot of people.  I will go back and choose the cream otion instead.  I appreciate your wisdom.

Level 5 19,168 posts since
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3. Jun 27, 2012 8:50 AM in response to: frannykats
Re: Cream vs White Paper

Actually, what little wisdom I have suggests that you do what is best for your book.

 

If you want to test things, print out a page on cream stock and a page on white.

 

Walton

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5. Jun 28, 2012 9:30 AM in response to: woof
Re: Cream vs White Paper

Funny you should ask:

 

 

These were scanned together.  They are relatively correct.  Of course, you monitor might display the colors correctly or not, depending on whether it has been calibrated recently.

 

To the eye, both the cream and the white paper stock varies in color over the last 10+ years (going back to BookSurge days); the white stock used in color books has not.

 

I picked a cream from the samples I have that falls in the middle and seems to be the most common.

 

My sample is small, so I could be wrong, too.


Walton

Level 5 15,505 posts since
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6. Jun 28, 2012 12:24 PM in response to: woof
Re: Cream vs White Paper

My poor eyesite prefers the stark contrast of black on white vs black on cream. And I agree with Michelle that the cream is more butter fat than cream in color.

 

Seal

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Level 5 5,703 posts since
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8. Jun 28, 2012 12:58 PM in response to: woof
Re: Cream vs White Paper

Yes it is and here is a recent scan with text.

 

 

 

My scan looks slightly lighter than Waltons so I am not sure if that is due to an actual difference in the paper or just the poor quality scanner.

 

 

 

 

R. C.

 

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Level 5 19,168 posts since
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10. Jun 28, 2012 1:47 PM in response to: woof
Re: Cream vs White Paper

As I said, a lot depends on your monitor.  I scanned two sheets of white and cream paper from CS books at the exact same time, immediately following callibrating my scanner. It's not a high end scanner, but on my monitor, the scans match the paper when I compare them.

 

Your monitor is different from mine, and whether it's have calibrated lately, I don't know. Even if I gave you the color values on my system for the cream . . .

RGB     R255 G249 B225

CMYK  C01 M01 Y12 K0

Lab       L98 a-1 b11

. . . that does that tell you if your monitor is off? In the CMYK, you can see that it has a lot of yellow, although yellow is a weak color.

 

I also mentioned that there is a fair amount of color variation in both the cream and the white . . . so if you want an exact color number, it may not represent exactly what you get.

 

Walton

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11. Jun 28, 2012 1:48 PM in response to: woof
Re: Cream vs White Paper

Likely neither unless your monitor is correctly calibrated to represent a print color profile. On my monitor, which is possibly out to lunch as I have not worked on calibrating it, my image is slightly lighter and has a bit more yellow than the actual book. Depending on how your monitor is setup what you see could be quite different than what I do.

 

R. C.

Level 5 15,505 posts since
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12. Jun 28, 2012 1:53 PM in response to: R.C.
Re: Cream vs White Paper

put together a fake test copy and order a cream pages book.

 

Seal

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13. Aug 16, 2012 11:41 AM in response to: woof
Re: Cream vs White Paper

Thanks for the info on the colors. Question I have is, how white is the white? Is it laser printer paper bright white? Or is it slightly off white at all?

 

I've received one proof so far, on cream, and it was a bit too yellow for my taste. Ideally I want a light cream. But if the "white" is really stark white, then cream would be the lesser of two evils for me.

 

Also, what is the texture of the white compared to the cream? Does the white feel like laser printer stock?

 

Thanks!

Level 5 5,703 posts since
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14. Aug 16, 2012 6:24 PM in response to: ReAnimus_Press
Re: Cream vs White Paper

I find the white paper to be a bright cool white, brighter than most standard copy stock similar to a photo stock but in a matte finish (color books do have a sheen but definitely not gloss).

 

The cream is darker than that in mass market books but comparable to cream stock trade paperbacks on my shelf. Both colors fluctuate slightly at times so it is difficult to really explain them. The best thing to do is print two samples one in each so you can see for yourself and decide what suits your book.

 

R. C.

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