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5,293 Views 5 Replies Last post: Feb 20, 2015 5:43 AM by walton RSS
Level 0 2 posts since
Jul 6, 2013
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Feb 17, 2015 12:02 PM

My art work keeps getting rejected.

My art work keeps getting rejected because the text is in the red zone .  When I try resize, It still does not get accepted.  Could someone please help??!!

Level 5 19,209 posts since
Sep 5, 2009
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1. Feb 17, 2015 12:07 PM in response to: babylou
Re: My art work keeps getting rejected.

First take a look at Bleeds, free, 19 page, illustrated guide to bleeds and margins, do's and don't's for CreateSpace.

 

If text (cover?) goes into the out-of-live margin (red), simply resizing the art as a whole generally won't work. You have to resize/reposition the text on its own layer, above the other art.

 

What program(s) are you working with?  What format is the art in?  Do you have the art in a multi-layered format?

 

Walton

Level 5 19,209 posts since
Sep 5, 2009
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3. Feb 17, 2015 4:41 PM in response to: babylou
Re: My art work keeps getting rejected.

If you have the finished art, probably flattened into one layer, it can be edited, but it can take between 1/2 to 3 hours (just to pick range I've found) to fix the text.

 

The offending text has to be removed (magic wand), then the gaps have to be cloned/painted in.  Once the image looks correct without the text, a text layer can be added. 

 

What I was asking was what format is the file in: for example, myfilename.jpg, or myfilename.tif, myfilename.psd. . . .

 

Walton

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4. Feb 19, 2015 6:50 PM in response to: babylou
Re: My art work keeps getting rejected.

how do i place graphics on my pages? i m new at this.

Level 5 19,209 posts since
Sep 5, 2009
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5. Feb 20, 2015 5:43 AM in response to: mack12
Re: My art work keeps getting rejected.

If you want to place an image on a page, the step by step details depend on the program you're working in.

 

Most programs permit drag and drop, copy and paste, linking, insert etc. At one time the safest way was to either Insert > Picture or Place > Picture.  This might or might not be case with all programs, but it is probably good insurance.

 

Other than graphics programs (Photoshop, GIMP, PaintShop Pro, XnView, etc.) resizing an image inside the program alters the resolution. Since the ideal resolution is 300 dpi (more correctly ppi), you should size your images in a graphics program to the exact size you need at 300 dpi.  I like to have at least two folders for the images: one is for the original or raw images, the other is for the working file: where I keep the properly sized images.

 

Then use Insert or Place to put them into the book file.  One an image is on the page, you can move it around without altering the resolution, and some programs permit cropping, which should not alter the resolution. 

 

If you are working in Word there are a few admonitions: 

  • Word wants to "compress" your images . . . this is actually downsizing, as in 300 dpi > 96 pdi.  You will want to disable this.
    • Word 2010: File > Options > Advanced > Image size and quality > Do not compress images in this document
  • Do not use Word's Save as PDF, this will downsize your images. Use a PDF conversion program (Acrobat ($$$), or free: doPDF, primoPDF, cutePDF, PDF995, etc.)
    • Note: most of these programs default to 8.5 x 11 as the trim/output/paper size; so you need to make sure you set the trim/output/paper size to the trim size your book is set to.

 

While you want 300 dpi, stuff can happen, e.g. you might tweak the size of the image inside the program.  If your image is 350 dpi or 280 dpi, it shouldn't matter. In fact, I've printed test images at 300 dpi and 200 dpi (through CS), and lost nothing at the lower resolution.  But you still should use 300 dpi. The only exception to that is for 1-bit, black and white images (generally line art), these you'd want at no less than 600 dpi, and I would recommend 800dpi or higher.

 

Walton

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