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19,392 Views 17 Replies Last post: Mar 16, 2010 3:28 PM by PJ2009 RSS
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Level 0 77 posts since
Sep 29, 2009
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Oct 2, 2009 8:18 AM

Meaning of 300 DPI

I see in the Submission Requirements that images are supposed to be stored at 300 dpi, but as far as I can see this is not an attribute of JPG or GIF files. According to Irfanview, DPI is not an attribute of GIF files, and in the case of JPG files, it seems to have the format a x b, but Irfanview says it can be changed if desired.  I typically set up my diagrams as JPG files, then convert them to GIF files, so I get the transparency feature for my web pages.  I don't really want to have to store all diagrams in several formats :-)

 

If this is still a requirement, how do I set it - and on what ?  Thanks in advance.

Level 5 14,264 posts since
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1. Oct 2, 2009 8:54 AM in response to: jpaulm
Re: Meaning of 300 DPI

It has been a while since I used and uninstalled Irfanview, but . . .

 

DPI is misleading, commonly it means pixels per inch. But injkjet printers can talk about dots per inch and mean how many dots of ink per inch, or dpp as how many dots of ink per pixel.  There are more meanings, but you get the idea.  Assume, with caution, DPI means PPI, pixels per inch.

 

There should be a an image size menu.  And in most image editing software you should be able to resize your image.  Always work with a copy.  Look at the resolution, for example 200 dpi.  You can reset/resize the image to 300 dpi.  But be careful:

  • You probably want to preserve the proportions. Make sure if this is an option, that you have it ticked.
  • Resample--if you do not resample and you go from 200 to 300, your image size will get smaller (the file size will stay the same), so if your image was 4 x 5, it might now be 21/4 x 3 1/4 (I am making these number up).  If you permit resampling, the image wil remain its original size (4X5), but it will be scaled up to 300 dpi.  You will notice that the files size got bigger. When you resample you  might have yet another option: Nearest Neighbor, Bilinear, or Bicubic--most of the time for most people in graphics, select Bicubic, it gives the best image quality.

 

I should add that GIF indexes colors and, depending on your art work, you could get banding. Again, depending on what the subject matter is, PNG can be a nice alternative to GIF.

 

DId I say, work with a copy? Always work with a copy.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Walton

Level 5 13,389 posts since
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2. Oct 2, 2009 8:56 AM in response to: jpaulm
Re: Meaning of 300 DPI
ANY transparancy will have your file rejected. Seal
Level 5 13,389 posts since
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4. Oct 2, 2009 10:05 AM in response to: jpaulm
Re: Meaning of 300 DPI
The problems occur when they rip the PDF apart for printing. Check some of the other discussions regarding transparancies and dpi you will find this to be the case. Seal
Level 0 7 posts since
Sep 22, 2009
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6. Oct 2, 2009 10:30 AM in response to: jpaulm
Re: Meaning of 300 DPI
I found that when I submitted the pdf of my book's cover I kept receiving notification from Createspace that graphics were showing up as between 140 to 199 dpi even though I was sure I had saved in Photoshop at 300 dpi. However, when checking the graphics up close I could see pixellation and realised that the end result would be fuzzy. Therefore I saved the graphic at 300 dpi in cm which made a vast difference. Graphics were sharp and no more notifications from Createspace.  Change your saving from inches to cm at 300 dpi.
Level 5 14,264 posts since
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7. Oct 2, 2009 11:15 AM in response to: jpaulm
Re: Meaning of 300 DPI

If Seal says transparancy is not good here, I'd accept that.

 

However, if you convert an image to JGP all transparency is removed and what was transparent become white.  For inkjet printing that is transparancey--the paper.


In Irfanview>Image>Information you get this:

 

Irfanview image size.jpg

Hope this helps,

 

walton

Level 3 703 posts since
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9. Oct 2, 2009 12:08 PM in response to: jpaulm
Re: Meaning of 300 DPI

300 dpi is intended for continuous-tone images such as photographs.

 

If your diagrams are line art, you have an alternative, which is to include them as vector art. I did one book that had a few diagrams in it. They were made in Adobe Illustrator and then incorporated into an InDesign book.

Level 5 14,264 posts since
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10. Oct 2, 2009 12:31 PM in response to: jpaulm
Re: Meaning of 300 DPI

When you export your odt file to PDF, you will get a screen that allows you to select a variety of things, similar to what you would get going from InDesign to Acrobat:

  • image comression (keep image quality as high as possible . . . only if the total file size is too big, should you reduce quality)
  • chage image dpi (if your images are 300dpi or higher, why reduce the dpi?)
  • security
  • etc.

 

In the test I just ran, I could double click on the pdf file and it opened in Acrobat, BUT the icon was not a PDF icon, so I don't know if you would have troubles with this file and uploading it to CS.

 

How to check: if you have acrobat you can check in Advance>Preflight, but if you don't, then I would do this:

Keep all of your file for your project in one folder.

Keep & Name all of your manscript drafts in a folder so that you KNOW what is what

 

When you export your complete manuscript, Look at it carefully in Acrobate Reader or, better, Acrobat (but I'm  assuming you don't have it). If it look good, but you are unsure of the images, open a navigation window to the image folder.  In thumbnail view you can cursor over each image and the alt tag will show the px X px size; in detail view, you can see the file size.  Look for anomolies.  Ok, it's 2AM and you're nervious, open all the image in Irfanview and look at each one in Image>Information.

 

Perhaps there is a way to review the image specs in your PDF without Acrobat, I don't know, but I'm sure someone will tell you.

 

Walton

Level 3 703 posts since
Mar 29, 2008
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13. Oct 2, 2009 5:57 PM in response to: jpaulm
Re: Meaning of 300 DPI
I'm pretty sure it can include shapes with color (or gray) fills or gradient fills in them. But the diagrams I did were just simple lines and circles, so don't take my word for it!

If you don't have Illustrator, you might be able to generate vector art with OpenOffice Draw or with Inkscape, and incorporate the results into your book PDF as vectors rather than rasterized images. Let us know how you get along.
Level 0 6 posts since
Sep 15, 2009
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14. Dec 10, 2009 6:07 PM in response to: jpaulm
Re: Meaning of 300 DPI
It looks like transparency isn't allowed in the ISO 19005-1 PDF/A standard.Word 2007 allows you to choose this format when you save as PDF (under Options), which I think flattens any transparency.

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